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Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana, Punjab



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Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana, Punjab
Address:Brown Road
Ludhiana (District Ludhiana)
Punjab, India
Pin Code : 148008


Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is a recognised institute / college. Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is managed by Society: Christian Medical College Ludhiana Society.
Principal of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is Mrs Triza Jiwan, Dr. S.R. Bhatti 9646900336, 94636-64125, Prof Sheila Das, Dr Abraham Thomas, Dr SM Bhatti.

Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is situated in Ludhiana of Punjab state (Province) in India. This data has been provided by www.punjabcolleges.com. Ludhiana comes under Ludhiana Tehsil, Ludhiana District.

Fax # of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is +91-161-2610708, 2600856, 5010819, 2600856.

Contact Person(s) of the Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is (are): Acting Director Dr John Pramod (in July 2004).

Residence Phone No(s) of concerned peron(s) of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is (are) : +91-161-224673.

Mobile No(s) of concerned persons at Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab are 98153-33610, 9988245500, 80547-00104.

email ID(s) is Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC) Ludhiana Punjab

Website of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is www.cmcludhiana.org, http://www.cmcludhiana.in.

Chairman : Dr Harinder Singh Bedi.

Contact Details of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab are : Telephone: +91-161-2226007,5010809, 2610708, 645171-81, 665956-57-59-60, 669924, 5020921-25,
Institute of Allied Health 0161-5045051
Principal Ph: 0161-5025791, 2664673
Blood Bank Telephone: +91-161-310817,
Nursing College Telephone: +91-161-2607364
other email id: care@cmcludhiana.in, ludhiana_cmcl@hotmail.com, jayarajpandian@yahoo.co.in,
Mr Valentine, Additional Account Officer

Dr Harinder Singh Bedi, Organising Chairman, drhsbedicmc@gmail.com
International Masterclass and Workshop on Venous Disease
Head, Dept of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, CMC
Tel 0161-2660022, Mobile 99882-45500

College affiliated With :
Punjab Nurses Registration Council, Chandigarh
Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS), Faridkot

Staff members:
Dr Jeyaraj Durai Pandian, MD DM FRACP, Professor and Head, Dept of Neurology


Courses

BDS, B.Sc.(Nursing)
Diploma in Anesthesia
Diploma in Child Health
Diploma in Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Diploma in Radio-Diagnosis
M.Ch - Neuro Surgery
M.Ch - Plastic Surgery
MBBS
MD - Anaesthesiology
MD - Anatomy
MD - Bio-Chemistry
MD - General Medicine
MD - Pharmacology
MD - Physiology
MD - Radio Diagnosis
MD - Radiothrapy
MS - Anaesthesia
MS - Anatomy
MS - General Surgery
MS - Ophthalmology
MS - Orthopaedics
M.Sc Nursing
Latestly:Three years degree in Allied Science


Number of seats in Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab is 50 seats.
Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab runs course(s) in Medical, Nursing stream(s).

Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC) is affiliated with Punjab Nurses Registration Council PNRC, Chandigarh (Punjab)


Profile of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC)

The Christian Medical College, Ludhiana Society (Regd.) is a Christian Educational and Research Institution established, maintained and administered by Christian Churches and Christian agencies in India. In 1953 the college started the MBBS program affiliated with Panjab University, Chandigarh admitting men and women students. Since July 1999 the college has been affiliated with Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Faridkot. The Post-graduate program started in the Sixties. The college offers Post-graduate Diploma, Degree, Super specialty and Doctoral courses. PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES OF THE INSTITUTION Christian Medical College Ludhiana Society, on behalf of the Church, seeks to contribute to the health needs of India by training primarily Christian Medical, Dental, Nursing and other health professional students and by providing holistic health services to the community and the nation, with people of the Christian faith serving in Christ’s name alongside with those of other faiths, who identify with these aims and goals. In fulfilment of this objective the Society has established the Institution (Christian Medical College, Christian Dental College, College of Nursing, College of Physiotherapy, Hospitals and other units) as a Christian Institution in name, content and character. In furtherance of the above affirmations, the Christian Medical College, Christian Dental College, College of Nursing, Hospitals and other units are administered as an educational and research Institution of an all India character, run, managed and administered by Christian men and women as health professionals, to the highest standards and in the spirit of Jesus Christ, for the healing ministry of the Church in India. Staff of all faiths shall live and serve together in the Institution in an atmosphere of mutual respect, trust and love. In this atmosphere of mutual trust and understanding, all the staff shall together strive to create a climate of excellence that is marked by a sense of God’s presence and action in their corporate ministry in the Institution.

Stuff



Images / newspaper cuttings related to Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC)

CMCH doctor mows down cyclist (Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC))
News: 20th September, 2014
CMCH doctor mows down cyclist
Stroke unit has treated 104 patients with clot bursting drug, CMCH (Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC))
News: 19th September, 2014
Stroke unit has treated 104 patients with clot bursting drug, CMCH

Church thanks members for backing stir against corruption \ (News)
CMCH staff shows faith in Director (News)
Amid controversy, CMCH chief resigns (News)
Church accuses CMCH Chairman (News)
Asstt Professor and Senior Residents (Job Vacancy)
Construction of Hostel block (Tender)
Senior Resident (Job Vacancy)
MSc in Nursing (Admission Notice)
CMCH opens dialysis care centre (News)
Students attend MBBS counselling (News)
Workshop on Haemophilia (News)
Superspeciality courses (Admission Notice)
Blood donation camp held (News)
CMCH docs save brain stroke patients life (News)
Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Admission Notice)
Asstt Professor for Cardiac Anaesthesia (Job Vacancy)
Medical Professionals get degrees (News)
Asstt Professor and Senior Resident (Job Vacancy)
CMC employee arrested (News)
CMC employee held in admission scam (News)
CMC immersed in Christmas fevour (News)
MD MS and PG Diploma (Admission Notice)
BDS and MDS Course (Admission Notice)
Asso Professor and Secretarial (Job Vacancy)
CMC get affiliation of Degree in Allied Sciences (News)
Scientific symposium held at CMCH (News)
CMCH celebrates Childrens day (News)
Two held for making hoax bomb call to PCR (News)
CMC to host medical biochemist conference (News)
CMC me bomb ki afwah se hadkamp (News)
CMCH appeals for help of poor patient (News)
Spectral imaging workshop held (News)
City hospital management committee meets (News)
Dharna of Youth Congress on CMC Hospital (News)
Junior Research Fellow (Job Vacancy)
Social Worker (Job Vacancy)
Alzheimer Day celebrated (News)
Front desk receptionists (Job Vacancy)
CMCH staff protest, demand pay hike (News)
MC demolishes ramps encroaching on roads (News)
Senior Residents (Job Vacancy)
Dr Thomas got recognition (News)
MSc Nursing (Admission Notice)
1000 units blood barbaad (News)
Hazaro unit blood kar diya bekar (News)
Superspeciality Courses (Admission Notice)
Heart surgery ke sath kiya Valve repair (News)
CMC me vishesh State se hua mariz ka upchar (News)
Natal khel me jutai charity (News)
MBBS, BDS and BPT Courses etc (Admission Notice)
Music show kar karayenge garibo ka ilaaz (News)
BDS, MBBS and BPT Courses (Admission Notice)
Alumni meet in CMC (News)
Mr Pardeep Kumar on leave (Public Notice)
Dr Bedi International conference se laute (News)
Sports meet in CMC Nursing College (News)
Professor, Asstt Professor and Associate Professor (Job Vacancy)
MD, MS and PG Diploma courses (Admission Notice)
CMC me new City Scan machine ka kiya udhghatan (News)
Ragging mamla lokhit patition wich tabdeel (News)
Dr Bharti Uppal Awarded (News)
Dr Barel Hovi ke nidhan par shok vayakt (News)
CMC me Painting Mela ayojit (News)
CMC ko troma care me National Award (News)
CMC da mahol vigadan valea nu sakhat chetavni ditti (News)
CMC employes union ka gathan (News)
Professor James ke nilamban par Highcourt ne manga jawab (News)
Parbhandan ko notice jari kar manga javab (News)
Mahiro ko diye dantesiv care par tips (News)
Prof, Asstt Professor and Associate Professor for various departments (Job Vacancy)
Professor and Associate Professor for Neurology and Urology Departments etc (Job Vacancy)
BDS Course (Admission Notice)
Professor, Asstt Professor and Associate Professor etc (Job Vacancy)
MSc Nursing 2012 (Admission Notice)
Prof, Asstt Prof and Associate Professor etc (Job Vacancy)
24 Hrs Emergency and Trauma Centre (Advertisement)
Super speciality courses (Admission Notice)
Operation theatre technician etc (Job Vacancy)
CMCH public authority,rules information panel (News)
MBBS, BSc Nursing and BPT Courses etc (Admission Notice)
MBBS,BDS,BSc Nursing and Bachelor of Physiotherapy Courses (Admission Notice)
MBBS,BDS and BSc Nursing Course etc (Admission Notice)
Hatho me Degrees le khushi se jhume Students (News)
CMC me Athletic meet ka shubharambh (News)
Assistant Finance Engineer and Electrical Engineer etc (Job Vacancy)
Senior Resident,Professor,Asstt Professor and Associate Professor (Job Vacancy)
MD,MS and PG Diploma courses (Admission Notice)
Senior Research Fellow and Coordinator etc (Job Vacancy)
Heart to Heart with a Distinguished Faculty (Advertisement)
High Court dismisses CMC appeal on admission norms (News)
Rajput Sanstha ne Student Sukhbir ka kiya samman (News)
Christian Medical College layi lajmi sponsership letter di sharat radd (News)
Haematology Oncology Unit (Job Vacancy)
Two Doctors for Haematology Oncology Unit (Job Vacancy)
Lady Receptionlist (Job Vacancy)
Proffessors Associate Proffessors and Assistant Proffessors etc (Job Vacancy)
MS in General Surgery (Job Vacancy)
Professors Assistant Professors and Associate Professors Senior Resident (Job Vacancy)
Diploma Course in the CMC Institute of Allied Health Science (Admission Notice)
Professor,Asstt Professor and Associate Professor etc (Job Vacancy)
Professors Assistant Professors and Associate Professors (Job Vacancy)
B Sc in Medical Technology (Job Vacancy)
Venous Association of India (Advertisement)
The Treatment of Cancer Patients (News)
Professor Assistant Professor and Associate Professor etc (Job Vacancy)
Medical camp wich 600 mariza di jaanch (News)
Wanted House Officers And Senior Resident (Job Vacancy)
Nursing Assistant Xray Technician and Physiotherapy etc (Job Vacancy)
Superspeciality Course DM and M ch (Admission Notice)
Assistant Profeesor (Job Vacancy)
Principal And Lecturers (Job Vacancy)
Urgently Required (Job Vacancy)
Application are Invited from candidateb who have passed the NBA CET SS Examination for an interview ()
Requires Professor And Assistant Professor (Job Vacancy)
Principal (Job Vacancy)
PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS (Job Vacancy)
Laboratory Technician (Admission Notice)
SC upholds CMCs minority status (News)
CMC threatened with disaffiliation (News)
Junior Consultants (Job Vacancy)
MD DA and Trained Technician DMLT etc (Job Vacancy)
MBBS and BDS Courses (Admission Notice)
Mr Pradeep Kumar Radiographer (Public Notice)
Abnormalities in CMC admission test (News)

Media coverage of Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC), Ludhiana Punjab, Punjab

Doctors at CMCH claim rare brain surgery

Ludhiana Doctors at the Christian Medical College and Hospital in Ludhiana claimed to have performed a complex brain aneurysm surgery on a 40-year-old patient, Tarlochan.
Aneurysm leads to brain hemorrhage, which most of the time lead to death. Most of the patients die because of delay in diagnosis and treatment.

Tarlochan was diagnosed with Aneurysm at the department of neurosurgery at CMCH. He was investigated with a 64 slice (non-invasive) CT angiogram and found to have two aneurysms. He had a ruptured left DACA (Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery) aneurysm and an un-ruptured right MCA (Middle Cerebral Artery) bifurcation aneurysm. Normally, he would have required two operations. First, emergency clipping of ruptured left DACA aneurysm followed by clipping of un-ruptured right MCA bifurcation aneurysm.

However, in a rare feat, a team of neurosurgeons comprising Dr Sarvpreet Singh Grewal (department head) and Dr Sukhdeep Singh Jhawar (assistant professor of neurosurgery) performed the surgery in a single operation. The patient was discharged after 10 days.


Munish Kumar Seth versus Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC) Ludhiana

STATE INFORMATION COMMISSION, PUNJAB
SCO No. 84-85, 2nd Floor, Sector 17-C, CHANDIGARH.

Shri Munish Kumar Seth, S/o Sh. Sudesh Kumar Seth,
c/o Janta Book Depot, Near Main Post Office,
Dhuri (Sangrur).
-----------Complainant
Vs

The Public Information Officer,
o/o the Director Christian Medical College & Hospital (CMC & H),
Distt.-Ludhiana. ----------Respondent

CC No. 454 of 2011

Present:- Shri Munish Kumar Seth complainant in person.
None on behalf the respondent.

ORDER

The complainant had applied to the PIO/Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana who sent a written reply on 28.8.2010 that it is a private institution registered under the Societies Registration Act and that it is not getting any grant/aid or financial assistance from Government and therefore, it is not covered by the provisions of the Right to Information Act, 2005. Another reply was also sent on 27.10.2010 to the information-seeker, again conveying that the respondent is not covered under the provisions of the Act ibid.

2. I have heard the complainant. The respondent is a registered society and there is no prima facie evidence to prove that it is receiving financial assistance from the State.

3. The complainant also submits that it has approached Baba Farid University of Health Sciences as Christian Medical College and Hospital is affiliated with that University. PIO/Baba Farid University of Health Sciences is directed that the request received from the present complainant under the Right to Information Act, 2005 may be examined in the light of Section 2(h) and Section 2(f) of the Act. In case Baba Farid University is statutorily empowered to receive this information from Christian Medical College and Hospital within the ambit of Section 2(f), it shall take appropriate action on the request of the information-seeker.

4. With this direction, the complaint case is closed.

(R.I. Singh)
March 31, 2011. Chief Information Commissioner
Punjab

M-S REMAX REALTORS PVT LTD VsCHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE LUDHIANA SOCIETY AND OT

IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB AND HARYANA AT CHANDIGARH.

CIVIL WRIT PETITION NO. 14172 OF 2009

DATE OF DECISION : September 10, 2009.

Parties Name M/S Remax Realtors Pvt. Ltd. ...PETITIONER
VERSUS
Christian Medical College, Ludhiana Society, and others ...RESPONDENTS

CORAM:
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE JASBIR SINGH

PRESENT:
Mr.P.L. Singla, Advocate, for the petitioner.

JASBIR SINGH, J. (oral)
ORDER:

After arguing for some time, counsel for the petitioner states that this writ petition be dismissed as withdrawn with liberty to seek relief from the Debt Recovery Tribunal. Ordered accordingly.

( Jasbir Singh )
Judge

Miss Anju Sharma versus Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC) Ludhiana

STATE INFORMATION COMMISSION, PUNJAB
SCO No. 84-85, Sector-17C, Chandigarh.

Miss Anju Sharma,
Advocate,
D/o Sh Dharam Pal,
R/o H. No. 861/1,
Lucha Luxmi Narayan,
Near Meena Bazar,
Ludhiana. …… Applicant
Vs

Public Information Officer,
O/o Christian Medical College & Hospital,
Ludhiana. …… Respondent
MR ' 122 of 2008
ORDER

Present:
None on behalf of the Applicant.

1. On the last date of hearing, on 19.2.2009, an additional opportunity had been given to the applicant to progress her case.

2. The applicant is, once again, not present for the second consecutive hearing. The appeal of the applicant is dismissed for non-prosecution.

3. Copy be sent to the applicant.

Chandigarh ( P.K.Grover )
Dated: 10.03.2009. Lt. Gen. (Retd.)
State Information Commissioner

Miss Anju Sharma versus Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMC) Ludhiana

STATE INFORMATION COMMISSION, PUNJAB
SCO No. 84-85, Sector-17C, Chandigarh.
Visit us at: www.infocommpunjab.com
Miss. Anju Sharma,
Adovate,
D/o Sh. Dharam Pal,
R/o H.No. 861/1,
Kucha Luxmi Narayan,
Near Meena Bazar,
Ludhiana. ……..Applicant

Vs

Public Information Officer,
O/o Christian Medical College & Hospital,
Ludhiana. …… Respondent

MR-122/2008
ORDER

Present:
None on behalf of the Applicant.

1. The case relates to seeking patient summary of Sh. Dharam Pal admitted to CMC on 31.08.2008. Initial request was made on 23.09.2008 and on not being conveyed that the relevant documents can be given only to the legal heirs of the deceased, the Applicant filed a complaint with the Commission on 20.11.2008. The Applicant is not present. As such, one more opportunity is given to the Applicant to progress the case.
2. To come up on 10.03.2009 at 2.00 PM.
3. Copy be sent to the applicant.


Chandigarh ( P.K.Grover )
Dated: 19.02.2009 Lt. Gen. (Retd.)
State Information Commissioner

AMISHA KURL Vs CRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLGE AND HOSPITAL AND ORS CWP 5478 of 2008

IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB and HARYANA, CHANDIGARH

Date of Decision: May 8,2008

Dr. Amisha Kurl ................. .................................Petitioner
Versus
Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana and others .....................................Respondents

Coram:
Honble Mr.Justice Ashutosh Mohunta
Honble Mr. Justice Kanwaljit Singh Ahluwalia

Present:
Mr. Sanjiv Bansal, Advocate for the petitioner.
Mr. D.S.Patwalia, Advocate for respondent Nos. 1 and 2.
Mr. G.B.S.Dhillon, Advocate for respondent No.3.

ASHUTOSH MOHUNTA, J.
The petitioner has prayed for quashing the selection of respondent No.3 to the Course of DGO (Post Graduate Diploma in Obstetric and Gynecology) in the Christian Medical College and Hospital (hereinafter
referred to as `CMC), Ludhiana, and offer the seat to her, as she was higher in merit.

Briefly the facts of the case are that the petitioner passed her MBBS Course from CMC, Ludhiana, in December 2005 and also completed her internship from the aforementioned Medical College. The CMC issued
Prospectus for Post Graduate Programmes 2008 for admission in various Post Graduate Diplomas and Degrees on 20.1.2008. The petitioner appeared in the written test and on passing the same also appeared in interview conducted by respondent Nos. 1 and 2.

Thereafter a merit-list was prepared in which the name of the petitioner appeared at Sr. No.78. On 8.2.2008 the first counselling was held. However, the petitioner was not offered any seat in the same. The second counselling was scheduled to be held on 28.3.2008. The petitioner went to attend the counselling and was called by the Registrar who checked all the original documents of the petitioner.

The Registrar told the petitioner that her documents were not complete and that she should also deposit the fee by way of a Demand Draft. It is the case of
the petitioner that she sought 30 minutes time to furnish the draft but no time was given to her and the admission has been given to respondent No.3 who was the next candidate in line and was lower in merit than the petitioner.

Counsel for the petitioner has contended that the admission given to respondent No.3 who was lower in merit than the petitioner is wholly illegal as the petitioner had sought only 5 or 10 minutes time to
bring the cash amount which was lying in her car. It is submitted by the learned counsel that the petitioner requested the Registrar a number of times
to give her some time to bring cash/draft but her request fell on deaf ears and in fact the Registrar became so infuriated and irritated that he called the
Security Staff to remove the petitioner from his office. Thereafter, admission was given to respondent No.3 who was below in merit than the petitioner. It has also been averred in the writ petition that the petitioner got prepared a Bank Draft in favour of CMC for an amount of Rs.1,75,000/- and handed over the same to the Registrar on the same day but the same was not accepted.

Written statement has been filed on behalf of respondent Nos. 1 and 2 wherein it has been averred that at the time of counselling the petitioner did not have the Certificate from the Principal regarding service in CMC, Ludhiana, and also the Demand Draft for payment of fee.

When the petitioner was asked to produce the Certificate as well as the amount of fee, the petitioner is stated to have replied that she would produce the Certificate within a period of two days and as far the fee is concerned she would pay the same within a period of one week. This fact was duly
recorded, `for want of Certificate in the check-list of the petitioner which was written by the Registrar himself. The petitioner was told that she has to deposit the fee immediately. It has further been averred that when the petitioner was asked to bring the fee, at that time the family members of the petitioner came barging in the office of the Registrar and stated that a sum of Rs.70,000/- was lying in the room and the same shall be got immediately by them and the balance amount of Rs.1 lac shall be given to the respondents at a later stage after procuring the same from their relatives.

The petitioner was apprised that the Demand Draft has to be for the full amount. At this stage, the husband of the petitioner is alleged to have taken out a Debit Card and the petitioner also took out her jewellery and put it on the table of the Registrar.

It was at this juncture that the Registrar walked out of his office and called the Security Staff and asked them to remove the petitioner and her family members.

It has further been averred that when the petitioner did not pay the amount of fee after waiting for half to one hour, as per the condition in the Prospectus, respondent No.3 was called in for counselling and as her documents were complete in all respects and she
had also brought a Demand Draft which was far in excess of the fee demanded, therefore, admission was given to respondent No.3. Counsel for the respondents submits that at page 15 of the Prospectus the procedure for allotment of the seats has been laid down. A perusal of Clause 5 of the procedure would show that candidates appearing for allotment of the seats by personal appearance had to bring the documents as mentioned in the Prospectus in original.

It was also clearly mentioned at internal page 17 of the Prospectus that the full fee was to be submitted along with scrutiny of relevant original documents and the fee had to be submitted only in the form of Demand Draft in favour of Christian Medical College Ludhiana Society. It was also specifically laid down in the Prospectus that if the seat was not claimed by full payment of college fee, the offer would be made to the next applicant on the list on the basis of merit. The Prospectus also clearly stipulated on page 21 that an application received without fee would be rejected and disqualified. On the basis of the aforementioned arguments, Mr. D.S.Patwalia, counsel for respondent Nos. 1 and 2, has submitted that as the application form of the
petitioner was incomplete because she did not produce all the required Certificates and also the fact that the petitioner did not submit the requisite fee, hence admission was rightly given to respondent No.3 who was next in merit.

We have heard the counsel for the parties at length.

A perusal of the conditions laid down in the Prospectus Annexure R1/1 shows that a candidate was required to show all the documents as mentioned in the Prospectus at the time of counselling. A candidate was also required to submit the fee by way of Demand Draft at the time to counselling.

From the pleadings of the parties it is clear that not only were the Certificates of the petitioner incomplete inasmuch as the petitioner did not have a Certificate from the Medical Superintendent/Principal regarding the service in CMC, Ludhiana, the petitioner also did not have the fee ready with her as it is admitted by the petitioner herself that she sought half an hours time to bring the same. When the College authorities demanded the fee, the husband of the petitioner came inside the office of the Registrar and stated that a sum of Rs.70,000/- was lying in the room and the balance amount would be given in a day or two. The petitioner is also alleged to have taken out her jewellery and put it on the table of the Registrar. It is because of this unruly behaviour on part of the petitioner and her family
members that the Security Staff was called by the Registrar and the petitioner as well as her family members were removed from his office. It was only thereafter that respondent No.3 was called in for counselling and as her papers were complete in all respects and she had brought a Demand Draft amounting to Rs.2,60,000/- instead of Rs.1,75,000/-, hence, admission was given to her.

The conditions laid down in the Prospectus have the binding force of law and since the petitioner did not produce all the original documents at the time of counselling nor deposited the entire fee by way of
a Demand Draft, therefore, respondents were fully justified in offering the seat to respondent No.3 who was next in the merit-list. It is not in dispute
that although the petitioner was more meritorious than respondent No.3 having been placed higher in merit but the fact remains that neither her Certificates were complete nor she had deposited the fee and, therefore, no illegality can be found in the action of the respondents in offering the seat to the candidate who was next in merit i.e. respondent No.3. No malafides have been attributed against any authority nor have the authorities gained anything by giving admission to a non-deserving candidate. If a candidate who is higher in merit does not deposit the fee at the time of counselling and needs a couple of days to deposit the same then the seat would have to be offered to the candidate who is next in the merit list because otherwise the admission process would never be complete as the candidate next in merit would have to wait till the fee is deposited by the candidate who is higher in merit. Therefore, it has rightly been laid down in the Prospectus that fee should be deposited immediately at the time of admission.

In view of the aforementioned facts, we do not find any merit in the present writ petition and the same is dismissed.

( ASHUTOSH MOHUNTA )
JUDGE

( KANWALJIT SINGH AHLUWALIA )
JUDGE

CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE LUDH SOC and ANR Vs STATE OF PUNJAB and ANR CWP 7232 of 2006

IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB AND HARYANA AT CHANDIGARH

DATE OF DECISION: May 8, 2008

CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE LUDHIANA ...PETITIONERS
SOCIETY AND ANOTHER
VERSUS
STATE OF PUNJAB and ANOTHER ...RESPONDENTS

CORAM:
HONBLE MR. JUSTICE ASHUTOSH MOHUNTA.
HONBLE MR. JUSTICE KANWALJIT SINGH AHLUWALIA.

PRESENT:
MR. D.S. PATWALIA, ADVOCATE FOR THE PETITIONERS.
MR. YATINDER SHARMA, DAG, PUNJAB.

ASHUTOSH MOHUNTA, J.(ORAL)
Learned counsel for the petitioners prays that he be allowed to withdraw the writ petition at this stage as Christian Medical College, Ludhiana has been exempted from the purview of the impugned notification.

Dismissed as withdrawn.

(ASHUTOSH MOHUNTA)
JUDGE

(KANWALJIT SINGH AHLUWALIA)
JUDGE

Pastoral committee protests against setting up of cancer centre in CMCH

Pastoral committee protests against setting up of cancer centre in CMCH
Ludhiana, February 18 Members of the pastoral committee of Kalvari Church CNI held a protest on Monday evening against the setting up of a Regional Cancer Centre on the premises of the Christian Medical College and Hospital.

The protesters said leasing of land to an outside agency was an attack on the identity of the hospital and a major setback for the Christian community. The centre is to be set up in collaboration with a US-based agency.

Around 200 members of the committee tore banners of the cancer centre and demolished the foundation stone plaque.
The plaque was to be unveiled on February 20 by Punjab Finance Minister Manpreet Singh Badal.

The CMCH management later issued a letter stating that it respected the sentiments of the Christian community.
It announced that any construction activity will be carried out only after due consultation with the committee.
On Monday morning, CMCH Director Dr John Pramod, had announced that the hospital will set up a Regional Cancer Centre on the hospital premises in collaboration with USA-based agency, Modern Oncology Private Limited.

We cannot allow CMCH land to be sold in instalments to any outside agency. We are strongly opposed to it and cannot tolerate this setback to the Christian community and the attack on the identity of the Christian institution, said Amril Gill, secretary of the pastoral committee.

Another member said the management was trying to sell the land to its partner Modern Oncology and that it will leave the community at the mercy of the outside agency.


NAVENDU GOYAL AND ORS Versus CHRISTIAN MEDICAL COLLEGE AND ORS CWP 4168 of 2007

Friday, 23rd March, 2007
IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB AND HARYANA AT
CHANDIGARH


Date of Decision: 23.3.2007

Navendu Goyal and another Petitioners
versus
Christian Medical Officer and others Respondents

CORAM:-
HON'BLE MR. JUSTICE JASBIR SINGH
HON'BLE MRS. JUSTICE NIRMAL YADAV

Present:
Shri Vijay Sharma, Advocate for the petitioners
Shri D.S.Patwalia, Advocate for respondent Nos.1 and 2<........more

PRABHJIT SINGH GILL Vs STATE OF PB AND ORS Civil Writ Petition 14886 of 2006

C.W.P. No.14886 of 2006

IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB and HARYANA AT CHANDIGARH


Date of decision: September 26,2006

Parabhjit Singh Gill V. State of Punjab and others

CORAM:
HON&#039;BLE MR.JUSTICE VINEY MITTAL
HON&#039;BLE MR. JUSTICE H.S.BHALLA

Present:
Shri Arun Jain,Advocate with Mr. H.S.Sethi,Advocate for the petitioner.
Shri Sukhdip Singh Brar, Additional Advocate General,Punjab, for respondent No.1.
Shri Atul Nehra, Advocate for respondent No.2.
Shri D.S.Patwalia, Advocate for respondent No.3.
Shri Pawan Mutneja,Advocate for respondent No.4.

Viney Mittal,J.
Petitioner, Parabhjit Singh Gill has challenged the admission granted to Abinav Mutneja, respondent No.4 in MBBS Course for the Session 2006 in Christian Medical College and Hospital,Ludhiana, respondent No.3. The aforesaid challenge has been made by the petitioner on the ground that respondent No.4 was lower in merit than the petitioner in NRI category.

The petitioner passed his 10+2 examination from Central Board of Secondary Education in the year 2006. He secured 85.33% marks in the said examination. Consequently he was eligible for admission in MBBS Course. The petitioner applied for seeking admission to MBBS Course 2006 in NRI Category in Christian Medical College and Hospital, respondent No.3. The candidates seeking admission in NRI or NRI sponsored Category were not required to appear in the entrance test but the admission to them was to be granted on the basis of the marks secured by them in the qualifying examination. The last date for the submission of the application form was June 20,2006, which was extended till June 30, 2006. As per the admission schedule, the candidates were required to be present for counselling on July 17,2006. Applicants seeking admission to MBBS Course in NRI Category were bifurcated into two categories. Applicants who were Non-Resident Indians themselves were placed in Category &#039;A&#039; whereas applicants who were sponsored by an NRI were placed in category &#039;B&#039;. A total of seven seats were meant for NRI category. As per the merit list, published on the wedsite of the respondent -College, the petitioner was placed at serial No.2 in category &#039;B&#039; of NRI sponsored category.

In the aforesaid category one Tejaswini Sidhuwas listed at serial No.1, having secured 90% marks whereas petitioner having secured
85.33% marks was listed at serial No.2. Similarly Abinav Mutneja
having secured 82.33% marks was listed at serial No.3.

The counselling for aforesaid NRI seats was scheduled for July 17,2006. Since all the seven seats were filled up from candidates available in category &#039;A&#039;, no seat was available for applicants in category &#039;B&#039;. However, as per the schedule indicated by the College, the next counselling for the NRI Categorywas fixed for August 11,2006.

The petitioner claims that on August 11,2006 also, he went to the College for attending counselling but was informed that no seat was available in NRI category. Again, as per the information published on the wedsite of the College, further counselling was schedule to be held on August 31,2006 for the saidCategory.

According to the petitioner, he went to the respondent- College on August 31,2006, when he was informed that one seat had become available. The petitioner claims that he was called for counselling being second in the merit list and was required by the Counselling Committee to fill up the form with regard to the documents which he had brought along with him i.e. his original certificates and testimonials. According to the petitioner, he produced the original of the matriculation certificate, detailed marks sheet of the qualifying examination (+2), undertaking attested by the Notary, his photographs and NRI sponsorship letter. The petitioner claims that the checking official ticked the requisite proforma in token of the availability of aforesaid original documents. The petitioner has appended a copy of the aforesaid proforma ticked by the checking official as annexure P/3 with the present petition.

However, when the counselling of the petitioner was still in progress,
the counselling Committee realized that the NRI sponsorship letter
produced by the petitioner was not the original letter but was merely a photocopy. Although the petitioner maintains that he tried to convince the said Committee that the said letter was original, but the Counselling Committee members did not accept the request of the
petitioner. Since the original NRI sponsorship letter in favour of the
petitioner was not produced by him at the time of counselling, the
application of the petitioner was rejected. Admission was granted to the next available candidate, as per the merit list. In these
circumstances, Abinav Mutneja respondent No.4 was granted
admission.

The petitioner claims that he submitted a representation dated September 1,2006 ( Annexure P/4) to the Director, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana bringing to the aforesaid fact to his notice. The matter was even reported to the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences.

However, through a communication dated September 5,2006, annexure P/5, the College informed the Vice Chancellor of respondent-university that the matter could not be reopened inasmuch as the admission had already been granted in the meantime to the next available candidate.

The claim of the petitioner has been contested by the respondent-College. In the written statement filed on behalf of the College, it has been maintained that at the time of counselling, held on August 31,2006, the petitioner was required to submit his documents along with all original testimonials but the petitioner had merely produced a faxed/photocopy of the sponsorship letter. The respondents have also maintained that at the time when the documents were produced before the checking official by the petitioner, tick marks was put on the check list but it was only at the time of counselling that it transpired that the sponsorship document of the petitioner was not the original document. According to the respondents, in view of the specific stipulation contained in the Prospectus that all the original certificates/testimonials were required to be produced at the time of counselling and failure thereof would result in cancellation of the candidature, the candidature of the petitioner was not taken into consideration and the admission was granted to the person next in the merit list. The respondents have also appended, copy of the minutes of the Undergraduate Selection Committee held on August 31,2006, annexure R-3/2 with the written statement. In the said minutes, the details of the happenings at the time of counselling have been given and it has been recorded that father of the petitioner, namely, Dr.J.S.Gill, had produced a photocopy of the faxed letter which was already available on the file of the College. He was told that he should be giving all documents in original only.

However, father of the petitioner stated that he had misplaced the original and searched his documents folder but was unable to find the same. It was in these circumstances that the next candidate Abinav Mutneja was called and all his documents being found in order, was granted admission. It is also recorded in the minutes that later on father of the petitioner appeared at 4.00 p.m., when an emergency meeting of the selection committee was called.

At that point of time, the father of the petitioner produced some
other documents which had not been produced by him in the
morning at the time of counselling.

The petitioner has filed replication to the written statement filed by the respondents.

We have heard learned counsel for the parties and have also gone through the record of the case with their assistance.

During the course of arguments, Shri D.S.Patwalia,learned counsel appearing for the respondent-College has also produced before us the original application form and the documents submitted by the applicant, at the time of counselling. We have perused the aforesaid documents and find that the stand taken by the respondent-College in the written statement is absolutely justified. The sponsorship letter in favour of the petitioner dated June 20,2006 has been issued by Dr. Brijinder Singh Kochhar who is a resident of USA who has expressed his willingness to sponsor the petitioner, Prabhjit Singh Gill, for pursuing his studies in the field of medicine.

However, the said sponsorship letter is only a faxed copy of the original. Similar is the certificate issued by the Manager of the WesBanco with regard to the financial status of Dr. Kochhar. Even the aforesaid certificate is merely a faxed copy.

Shri Arun Jain, learned counsel appearing for the petitioner has vehemently argued that the petitioner was in possession of the sponsorship letter dated June 20,2006, and it was on account of the aforesaid fact that he had applied for admission to MBBS course in NRI Category &#039;B&#039;. Shri Jain has maintained that there was absolutely no justification for the petitioner to have not produced the original certificate of sponsorship at the time of counselling held on August 31,2006. In support of the aforesaid contentions, learned counsel has also relied upon the proforma tick marked by the checking official which has been appended as Annexure P/3 with the petition. The original of Annexure P/3 has also been produced before us during the course of arguments. On that basis the learned counsel maintains that once the checking staff had found that all the certificates mentioned in the proforma were in order and originals were produced, then later on the Counselling Committee could not have rejected the claim of the petitioner on account of the allegation that the said certificate of sponsorship was merely a photocopy.

On the other hand, Shri D.S.Patwalia, learned counsel appearing for the respondent-College has specifically relied upon the minutes of the Undergraduate Selection Committee meeting held on August 31,2006 at 4.00 p.m. All the facts with regard to the counselling of the petitioner have been noticed in the aforesaid minutes. It has also been noticed that at 4.00 p.m.

when an emergency meeting of the Selection Committee was convened, the father of the petitioner had produced some other documents( original certificates) which had not been produced by the petitioner at the time of counselling in the morning. Learned counsel has maintained that since the specific stipulation contained in the prospectus was that a candidate seeking admission was required to produce the original certificates/testimonials, the failure thereof would obviously result in rejection of candidature of such a candidate.

We have duly considered the rival contentions of the learned counsel for the parties. In our considered view, there is no merit in the present petition.

It is not in dispute that the petitioner is more meritorious than respondent No.4, having secured more marks in the qualifying examination.

However, the fact remains that at the time of counselling held on August 31,2006, the petitioner had failed to produce the original documents. It was specifically stipulated in the prospectus that a candidate seeking admission was required to produce the original documents/testimonials at the time of counselling. Since the original sponsorship letter could not be produced by the petitioner at the time of counselling, the respondent-College was absolutely justified in offering the seat to the next available candidate on the merit list.

There is absolutely no justification to believe the allegations of the petitioner that in spite of the fact that he had produced the original sponsorship letter at the time of counselling, admission was denied to him and person lower in merit i.e. respondent No.4 was admitted. The College had nothing to gain by the aforesaid process. No mala fides whatsoever have been alleged in the petition, neither any allegations of favourtism have been pleaded, In these circumstances, it is the pleas raised by the petitioner, as against the pleas raised by the College, which have to be weighed. We have absolutely no doubt that the stand taken by the respondent-College is justified and is as per the factual position.

We have no material to doubt the correctness of the pleas raised by
College.

At this stage, Shri Arun Jain learned counsel appearing for the petitioner has also brought to our notice, an order dated September 11,2006 issued by the Principal Secretary to Government of Punjab , Department of Medical Education and Research (Annexure P/6) with the petition. As per the aforesaid order,according to the learned counsel for the petitioner, the number of NRI seats in Christian Medical College,Ludhiana has been raised to 8 during the session 2006-07. On the basis of the aforesaid order passed by the State government, the petitioner claims that since one more seat has become available to the College, the claim of the petitioner be considered for the said seat.

Shri D.S.Patwalia, learned counsel appearing for the respondent-College has,however, shown his ignorance of the said fact as to whether number of NRI seats in the college has bee raised from 7 to 8.

However, from the perusal of the order Annexure P/6, we find that some directions have been issued by the State Government. Since the learned counsel or the respondent-College is not in a position to comment upon the aforesaid fact,, therefore, we direct that if an additional seat has become available to the respondent-College for being filled from NRI category, the same be filled up in accordance with law and as per the schedule of counselling announced by the respondent-College, through a notice put on the Notice Board and also published on the Website.

However, if the aforesaid factual position claimed by the petitioner is
incorrect, then no further action is required to be taken by the College in this regard.

As a result of the aforesaid discussion, we do not find any merit in the present petition. The same is dismissed.

(Viney Mittal )
Judge

( H.S.Bhalla )
Judge

TEJASWINI SIDHU Vs STATE OF PB AND ORS CWP 14491 of 2006


IN THE HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB and HARYANA AT CHANDIGARH
Date of decision: September 26,2006


Tejaswini Sidhu V. State of Punjab

CORAM:
HON&#039;BLE MR.JUSTICE VINEY MITTAL
HON&#039;BLE MR. JUSTICE H.S.BHALLA

Present:
Shri B.B.S.Sobti, Advocate for the petitioner.
Shri Sukhdip Singh Brar, Additional Advocate General,Punjab, for respondents No.1 and 2.
Shri D.S.Patwalia, Advocate for respondents No.3,4 and
5.
Shri Atul Nehra, Advocate for respondents No.6 and 7.
Shri M.S.Guglani, Advocate for respondent No.8.
Shri Pawan Mutneja, Advocate for respondent
No.9,Abinav Mutneja (also arrayed as respondent
No.10.)

Viney Mittal,J.
Petitioner, Tejaswini Sidhu, has approached this court challenging the selection/admission granted to Abinav Mutneja (arrayed as respondent No.9 and 10 in the present petition) in M.B.B.S. Course in NRI Category &#039;B&#039; ( NRI sponsored candidate category) in Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. A further prayer has been made for issuance of direction to the aforesaid college for selecting and admitting the petitioner in the said Course in the said NRI Category &#039;B&#039;. The aforesaid challenge has been made by the petitioner with the averments that she has better merit than respondent, Abinav Mutneja. A direction has also been sought against Baba Farid University of Health Sciences not to recognise the admission of Abinav Mutneja and not to register the aforesaid admission but on grant of admission recognise the admission of the petitioner in the said Course.

It has been averred by the petitioner that she passed her Senior Secondary examination securing 91.06% marks as per the detailed mark sheet dated May 23,2006 from Central Board of Secondary Education. The petitioner thereafter sought admission in Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana,respondent No.3, in NRI sponsored category. It has been claimed by her that for the aforesaid purpose she obtained the requisite eligibility certificate from Baba Farid University of Health Science, respondent No.6. The petitioner claims to have submitted her application form on the prescribed proforma, as available in the prospectus 2006, for admission to M.B.B.S. 2006 Course against NRI Category.

Since the petitioner was seeking admission in NRI Category, therefore, she was not required to take any entrance test. As per prospectus, admission against NRI Category to MBBS Course in the College was to be made on the basis of the merit obtained by an applicant in 10+2 or equivalent examination. The only eligibility required for applicant seeking admission to MBBS course was that he or she must have obtained not less than 50% marks in English and 50% marks in Physics, Chemistry and Biology together. The petitioner
claims that she was duly eligible as per the aforesaid eligibility conditions.

According to the petitioner, the applicants in NRI category seeking admission to the Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana were bifurcated into two categories i.e. &#039;A&#039; and &#039;B&#039;. The candidates in category &#039;A&#039; were such applicants who are actually NRIs, whereas candidates who were sponsored by NRIs were to be placed in category &#039;B&#039;. The college had prepared the merit list on the basis of the marks of the candidates obtained in 10+2 or equivalent examination. According to the petitioner in category &#039;A&#039;, 19 candidates were listed. The first candidate in the merit list was having 94.41% marks whereas the last candidate in category &#039;A&#039; was having 57.66% marks. 12 candidates were indicated in category &#039;B&#039;. The petitioner was placed at serial No.1 in category &#039;B&#039; and was shown to have obtained 90% marks whereas the last candidate listed in the said category was shown to be having 58% marks. The total seats available in NRI category (&#039;A&#039; and &#039;B&#039;) were only 7. It was stipulated that in case 7 eligible candidates from category &#039;A&#039; were not available, then the candidates from category &#039;B&#039; were to be considered.

The petitioner maintains that as per the schedule of admission process, the date of first counselling of NRI category was fixed as July 17,2006. All the candidates/applicants were required to report on the said date from 9.00 a.m. to 1 .00 p.m. whereas the candidates in the waiting list were required to report at 2.00 p.m. on the same day.

The petitioner claims that she was present at the time of counselling on July 17,2006 and insisted upon the College authorities to mark her presence but she was informed that since 7 candidates from category &#039;A” were already available ,therefore, there was no necessity of marking her presence. According to the petitioner, she was informed that all the seats in the said course against NRI category had been filled up.

The petitioner claims that she was very keen and interested in getting admission in Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana and, therefore, she kept on making enquiries for any further counselling.

She came to know that a further counseling was scheduled for August 11,2006. Consequently, the petitioner claims to have reached the respondent-Medical College on August 11,2006. At that point of time, she claims to have been informed that all the seven seats in the NRI category had already been filled up from category &#039;A&#039; and there being no vacant seat, no counselling for any NRI candidate would be held on the aforesaid date.

Consequently, the petitioner claims to have come back. The petitioner has also alleged that the practice and procedure being adopted by the respondent-Medical College was doubted by the petitioner and, as such, she had already written a communication to the Principal of the respondent-College on July 27,2006, wherein she had specifically requested that in case there was likelihood of any vacant seat against NRI category, then in that situation the petitioner was willing to be admitted against the said vacancy. The petitioner also requested the Principal of the College to notify her, if any seat fell vacant. For the aforesaid purpose, the petitioner even gave her residential address. A copy of the aforesaid communication has been appended as Annexure P/6 with the present petition.

The petitioner claims that she did not receive any response from the College in this regard but later on learnt that Abinav Mutneja ( arrayed as respondent No.9 and 10) had been admitted against NRI category &#039;B&#039;. According to the petitioner, the aforesaid candidate Abinav Mutneja was shown at rank No.3 in category &#039;B&#039;, having obtained 82.33% marks, whereas the petitioner was shown at rank No.1 in NRI category &#039;B&#039; with 90% marks. On that basis, the petitioner has maintained that selection/admission of Abinav Mutneja, who was concededly lower in merit than the petitioner, in preference to the claim of the petitioner is absolutely illegal,unjustified and liable to be set aside. In these circumstances, the petitioner has approached this court through the present petition.

The claim of the petitioner has been contested by the respondents.

Two separate written statements have been filed. One written statement has been filed by the respondent-College on behalf of respondents No.3 to 5. A separate written statement has been filed by Abinav Mutneja the selected candidate.

In the written statement filed by the College,respondent No.3, the ranking of the petitioner vis-a-vis Abinav Mutneja, has not been disputed. It has not been disputed that Abinav Mutneja was having lessor marks than the petitioner. However,the claim of the petitioner has been contested by the College on the plea that the first counselling for admission to M.B.B.S. Course in NRI Category was
held on July17,2006. Thereafter on July 18,2006, a notice for further
counselling for MBBS/BDS/BSC Nursing admission for NRI category was put up on the website of the College, as well as Notice Board of the College. A copy of the aforesaid notice has been appended as annexure R3/1 with the written statement. As per the aforesaid notice, it was stipulated by the College that if there were any vacancies in MBBS Course in the NRI category, the counseling would take place on August 11,2006 and thereafter the third counselling would be held on August 31,2006 and the consequential vacancies, if any, would be filled up by September 14,2006 and September 30,2006. The respondent-College has maintained that the aforesaid notice was well within the knowledge of the petitioner, inasmuch as, in pursuance of the aforesaid admission , counseling schedule, as indicated in the notice, the petitioner had duly appeared for counselling on August 11,2006. However, at that point of time , no vacancy was available for grant of any further admission.

However, one Rahul Bhandari who was indicated at serial No.1 in
the merit list and had been admitted on July 17,2006, was declared
as ineligible by the respondent-University. A communication in this
regard was received by the College on August 30,2006. In these
circumstances, one seat had become vacant in MBBS course in the
NRI category on the aforesaid date i.e. August 30,2006. As per
schedule already indicated, third counselling was held on August
31,2006. On the aforesaid date, no candidate in category &#039;A&#039; came
present. The petitioner was not present on the aforesaid date, although,as per the respondents, she was very well aware of the date of the third counselling scheduled for August 31,2006, therefore, the candidature of student at serial No.2 in category &#039;B&#039; namely, Prabjit Singh Gill, was considered but since his certificates/testimonials were not found to be in order, therefore, he was not granted admission . It was only thereafter that the next candidate being Abinav Mutneja was granted admission in the said category. On the basis of the aforesaid fact, respondent-College has maintained that the petitioner having absented herself from counselling on August 31,2006, was not entitled to be considered on the aforesaid date and as such, cannot be heard to make any grievance against the grant of admission to Abinav Mutneja.

In addition, respondents have maintained that as per their information the petitioner had already taken admission in Adesh Institute at Bhatinda which is also a medical College affiliated with Baba Farid University and Health Sciences, and having commenced her studies at the said college, was no more interested in appearing for counselling for August 31,2006. According to the respondents, the challenge made by the petitioner to the admission granted to Abinav Mutneja has been made merely as an afterthought.

To the similar effect are the pleas raised by Abinav Mutneja in the separate written statement.

We have heard the learned counsel for the parties at some length and with their assistance have also gone through the record of the case.

The facts with regard to the comparative merit of the petitioner vis-a-vis Abinav Mutneja respondent are not in dispute.

The only controversy which arises for determination is as to whether the petitioner having not been present at the time of counselling on August 31,2006, could still be heard to challenge the admission granted to Abinav Mutneja, who had been so admitted on the aforesaid date.

The respondent-College has appended a copy of the Prospectus-cum- Application Form for 2006 Admission as Annexure R3/2. The aforesaid prospectus specifically stipulates that provisional merit list for NRI admissions would be prepared on the basis of the marks obtained by the applicants in the qualifying examination and will be displayed on the Notice Board of Registrar&#039;s office and would also be published on the website of the College. It has specifically been provided that failed,absent candidates or those found ineligible would not be informed separately. The prospectus also stipulates that if the seat allowed to a candidate is not claimed by payment of full college fees for the year 2006-07 by the stipulated date and time by the selected applicants or their representatives, the offer will be withdrawn and the seat would be offered to the next applicant in order of merit. Failed candidates, absent candidates or those found ineligible would not be informed separately.

Shri BBS Sobti, learned counsel appearing for the petitioner has vehemently argued that the petitioner had duly appeared for conselling on July 17,2006, when on account of the fact that all the seats in NRI Category were filled from NRI Category &#039;A&#039;, the petitioner was not admitted. According to the petitioner, she had on some information made available to her, had appeared for counselling on August 11,2006 as well. Even at that point of time, no vacancy was available for being filled up from category &#039;B&#039;.

Consequently, the petitioner could not be admitted on the aforesaid
date also. However, the petitioner maintains that she had no further
information with regard to any counselling for August 31,2006 and as
such could not be denied admission when a seat had become
available.

However, the respondents along with the written statement, have appended a copy of the notice as Annexure R3/1, wherein the entire schedule of counselling was indicated. The second counselling was scheduled to be held on August 11,2006 whereas the third counselling was to be held on August 31,2006.

Consequential vacancies ( if any) arising from 31st August to 30th
September were required to be filled by way of counselling on
September 15,2006 and September 30,2006. In these
circumstances, when the petitioner on her own showing appeared in 2nd counselling held on August 11,2006, then it is not comprehensible as to how she can claim ignorance of third counselling scheduled for August 31,2006. A specific case set up by the respondent is that the entire schedule for counselling had been notified through the aforesaid notice Annexure R3/1, wherein the second counselling was scheduled for August 11,2006 and the third counselling was scheduled for August 31,2006. In these circumstances, when the petitioner had appeared for second counselling on August 11,2006, it has to be inferred that she knew of third counselling scheduled for August 31,2006 also, but had chosen not to appear at the time of counselling, for the reasons best known to her. May be because of the fact that she had already been admitted to Adesh Institute at Bhatinda, she had lost interest.

However, that would be a matter which would be within the exclusive
knowledge of the petitioner and we would not like to offer any
comments thereupon.

We have already taken note of the plea raised by the respondents that on July 17,2006 all seats in NRI category stood filled from category &#039;A&#039; only. In these circumstances, the petitioner could not be considered for admission on the aforesaid date. Even at the time of second counselling on August 11,2006, no vacancy was available in the said category. The petitioner, though appeared on the aforesaid date, could not be admitted. However, a vacancy had become available to the respondent-College on August 30,2006, when admission granted to one Rahul Bhandari on July 17,2006 was cancelled. In these circumstances, the aforesaid seat was required to be filled up in the counselling scheduled for August 31,2006. The candidature of one Parabjit Singh Gill, who was placed at serial No.2 in category &#039;B&#039;, was considered at the first instance.

However, his testimonial/certificates were not found in order.

Consequently,he was denied admission. Abinav Mutneja being next
in merit was granted admission. We do not find any fault with the
procedure adopted by the respondent-College.

To be fair to the learned counsel for the petitioner, two judgments relied upon by him in support of the claim made must be noticed.

Learned counsel has relied upon a Division Bench judgment of this court in Randhir Singh V. Chandigarh Administration and others 1993(1) Recent Services Judgments 695 and a single bench judgment of this court in N ishu Bala V. Punjabi U niversity 2000(2)
R.S.J. 140.

We have duly considered the aforesaid judgments also but find the same are not applicable to the facts and circumstances of the case.

In Randhir Singh&#039;s case, in the peculiar facts and circumstances of that case, it was observed by the Divi;ion Bench of this court that since the petitioner in the aforesaid case was always available in the office of the Principal ,therefore, the grant of admission, to a person lower in merit was not justified.

Similarly in Nishu Bala&#039;s case (supra) also, it was noticed by this court, again on facts and circumstances of that case, that plea raised by the respondent-College that a notice was put on the Notice Board was doubtful. It was in these circumstances that it was observed that it would not be fair and just to deprive candidates of their right of admissions by recourse to such indefinite method of admission.

However, as noticed in the above portion of the judgment, in the present case the prospectus specifically provided that the merit list of NRI candidates for admission was to be prepared on the basis of the marks obtained by the applicants in the qualifying examination and was to be displayed on the notice board of the office of the Registrar and was also to be published on the website of the College. It was specifically stipulated that no information would be supplied separately to failed, absent candidates or those found ineligible. Once the said procedure for admission had been followed by the College by putting up notice on the notice board as well as on the website to which all the applicants had free access, it cannot be accepted that the petitioner had no knowledge of the date of counselling scheduled for August 31,2006.

It is apparent that the aforesaid plea has been raised by the petitioner merely with a view to support her claim.

In view of the facts and circumstances, as noticed above, when the petitioner was not present at the time of counselling on August 31,2006, and her claim was not considered and on account of her absence, and the admission was granted to the next available candidate in accordance with law, we find no fault with the same.


Consequently, the present petition is devoid of any merit. The same is dismissed.

(Viney Mittal )
Judge

( H.S.Bhalla )
Judge

CMC students hail decision on registration

The coordination committee of postgraduate students of the CMC has welcomed the decision of the BFUHS to issue roll numbers to students of B.Sc/M.Sc Nursing and the registration of students of BDS admitted to Christian Dental College in 2005.

Hailing the initiative taken by Vice-Chancellor Ravinder Sidhu, Registrar P. L. Garg of the BFUHS and the administration of the CMC, the committee members said the step was taken to create an atmosphere of mutual trust by solving the pending issues amicably.


Woman killed in accident

Kamal Bedi, a resident of Ludhiana, was killed and her husband injured seriously when their car rammed into a truck near the octroi post here this morning. The car rammed into the truck when Mr Nobel Justin Bedi, who was driving the car, lost control. The couple was on way to Faridabad from Ludhiana. While Kamal Bedi died on the spot, Nobel sustained injuries. He was admitted to Christian Medical College, Ludhiana.



Ludhiana doctor heads gastro endo surgeons body

Prof of Surgery of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Dr Kuldip Singh, has been elected as president of the Indian Association of Gastro Endo Surgeons for a term of two years (2006-2008). He was installed as President during the National Congress of Endoscopic surgery held in Bangalore. He was also nominated as a member of the Governing Council of the International Federation of Endoscopic Surgical Societies.

Dr Kuldip Singh also represents India as a member of the Governing Board of Endoscopic Laparoscopic Surgeons of Asia Association. He began his surgical career in 1980 after his post graduation from Government Medical College, Patiala. Thereafter he worked as Registrar and consultant surgeon in Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, PGI, Chandigarh and Dayanand Medical College.

He has been in the field of laparoscopic surgery since its inception in 1990. He got his training as certified surgeon in Laparoscopic surgery from Middlesex Hospital, London. His innovation of tackling difficult gall bladder surgery through lapaproscopic system has been acknowledged worldwide.




Parents of nursing students resent fee hike

The parents of students of the College of Nursing in Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMCH) today staged a protest and submitted a memorandum to the college authorities against a hefty increase in the annual fee and other charges for the second and third year students. The protesting parents maintained that the increase in the fee from around Rs 42,000 to Rs 81,400 was arbitrary and uncalled for.

The CMCH management, however, justified the fee hike, which it claimed, had been done as per the decision taken by the Christian Medical College Ludhiana Society in its meetings held on April 19 and June 29.

According to Dr John Pramod, Acting Director of the CMCH, the government has yet to notify the fee structure of the CMC for its medical, dental and nursing colleges, and it has not provided any financial assistance to the institution.

In the memorandum submitted by the parents, it was pointed out that the fee hike had not been approved by the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, with which the college was affiliated. Moreover, when the Justice G.R. Majithia Committee, set up on the directions of the Supreme Court, had recommended an annual fee of Rs 30,000 for nursing colleges, the CMCH management ought to fix the tuition fee and other charges within that range.

The parents also questioned the justification for charging library fee when there was no well-stocked library for the students and an annual establishment fee of Rs 10,000 from the nursing students.

Mr Narinder Singh, parent of a nursing student from Amritsar, told Ludhiana Tribune that the majority of the parents of nursing students belonged to economically weaker sections and they had sent their wards for nursing studies with the hope that after graduation the children would be in a position to support their families. “Many of us (parents of nursing students) are not in a position to bear the additional burden of massive fee hike and even the prevailing annual fee seems to be a little too much to us.”


Majithia panel cuts fee of medical, dental colleges

The Fee Fixation Committee of the Department of Medical Education has recommended drastic changes in the fee structure of medical, dental and homoeopathic colleges in Punjab. The committee has also recommended an interim fee for nursing courses.

The recommendations are mandatory and applicable to all privately run medical institutions in the state.

The committee headed by Justice G.R. Majithia submitted its report to the state government today. Other members of the committee are Dr K.K. Talwar, Director, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGI), Prof R.P. Bambah, a former Vice-Chancellor of Panjab University, and Mr Amarjit Chopra, a senior chartered accountant from Delhi. The Secretary, Medical Education and Research, is its member-secretary.

The committee has recommended that Sri Guru Ram Dass Medical College (Amritsar) and Dayanand Medical College (Ludhiana) should charge an annual fee of Rs 1 lakh each for the MBBS course. It could not fix the fee for Christian Medical College (Ludhiana) as adequate data on the college was not available.

Privately managed medical colleges had been charging between Rs 2 lakh and Rs 3 lakh per annum from each of student. They refused to implement the interim recommendations, holding that Supreme Court directions had said the final recommendations were binding.

In its interim recommendation, the committee had fixed Rs 75,000, Rs 55,000 and Rs 35,000 as the annual fee for the MBBS, BDS and ayurvedic courses, respectively.

The fee committee could not make any recommendation on ayurvedic colleges. Since some of the nursing institutes were facing vigilance inquiries, the committee recommended an interim fee. For BSc and MSc (nursing courses), the annual fee would be Rs 30,000. For the GNM course, it would be Rs 25,000 while ANM students would pay a maximum of Rs 20,000 per annum.

Talking to The Tribune, Justice Majithia said that for various dental colleges, different fee structures had been recommended because of variations in the infrastructure, staff and facilities available at the institutions concerned.

Dasmesh Dental College, Faridkot, is in the upper bracket which can charge an annual fee of Rs 92,500 from each BDS student. For Guru Nanak Dev Dental Institute, Sunam, the committee recommended an annual fee of Rs 82,000. The annual fee recommended for other dental colleges is: Sri Guru Ram Dass Dental Institute (Amritsar) — Rs 78,000; Laxmibai Dental Institute (Patiala) — Rs 78,000; National Dental College (Dera Bassi) — Rs 68,500; and Desh Bhagat Dental College (Muktsar) — Rs 40,000.

Earlier, the Sunam college was charging Rs 1.32 lakh per annum from each student.

Justice Majithia said that in the case of the BHMS course, the committee had recommended for Guru Nanak Homoeopathy College (Ludhiana), an annual fee of Rs 12,000; for DM College (Ludhiana) Rs 31,500; for Lord Mahavira College (Ludhiana) Rs 17,500; for Homoeopathy College (Abohar) Rs 14,500; and for Kalyan Homoeopathy Institute (Tarn Taran) Rs 11,500.

Justice Majithia said that except in the case of Nursing courses, the fee recommendations were for the academic sessions 2003-2004, 2004-2005 and 2005-2006. Students could seek adjustment of the fee already paid by them during the first two years against the fee of the new academic year.

He said the committee was keen on submitting its recommendations before the counselling for the new academic session started tomorrow. The committee at its meeting held today directed the Department of Medical Education and Research to implement these recommendations immediately.

Further, the committee authorised the chairman to oversee the implementation of the report. The committee, Justice Majithia said, also had the right to review its recommendations if any of the medical institutions improved the infrastructure, the quality of staff and other facilities made available to students on the campus.




Girl awaits good Samaritans

Ms Gurdeep Kaur, an 18 year old girl from Khanna town in this district, was initially examined in the Christian Medical College and Hospital (CMCH) here in July 2004. She was suffering from severe chronic renal failure and was put on hemo-dialysis twice a week.

A suitable donor for kidney transplant was sought and her mother volunteered to donate one of her kidneys.

The financial condition of her family, with the father a truck driver and her mother unemployed, rendered the life saving but expensive transplant surgery, beyond their reach.

In response to a newspaper story about her condition, several people donated generously from India and abroad and Gurdeep was able to have a renal transplant in February this year.

According to Dr Basant Pawar, Professor and Head, Department of Nephrology at the CMCH, Gurdeep had one instance of acute rejection after renal transplant, which responded to treatment. Unfortunately, she had to be placed on stronger medicines to prevent any further rejection which entailed a monthly expense ranging between Rs 15000 and Rs 20,000.

As Gurdeep and her family cannot afford the cost of treatment, the CMCH management has made an appeal to kind hearted and generous people to come to the rescue of this young girl.

All those who wish to help this family and the young recipient of kidney, can send their cheques or demand drafts, made in favour of ‘CMC, Ludhiana Society’ for the treatment of Gurdeep Kaur, to Dr Basant Pawar, Head, Department of Nephrology, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana-141008. All financial assistance will be duly acknowledged.


CMC, SGPC institutes lock horns with govt

The minority medical educational institutions in Punjab are once again on a collision course with the state government. The Christian Medical College and Christian Dental College, Ludhiana, and the SGPC-run Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Dental Sciences, Amritsar, have been asked to fill their 50 per cent quota seats through the PMET being conducted by the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Faridkot, for admission to the MBBS, BDS, BAMS and homoeopathic colleges in the state.

The Christian Medical College and Christian Dental College management have been admitting students to the two institutes by conducting their own entrance test every year. Last year, too, the state government had directed them to fill the seats through the PMET conducted by the Baba Farid University of Health Sciences.

But the management went to the Supreme Court and got interim relief and they conducted their own entrance test and admitted students to the two institutes. The CMC admits 50 students in the MBBS and Christian Dental College has 50 seats.

Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences admits 50 students to the MBBS course and 60 students are admitted to Sri Guru Ramdas Institute of Dental Sciences. These two institutes have been admitting 50 per cent students on the basis of the PMET conducted by Baba Farid University under the government quota and the remaining 50 per cent through their own entrance test. But this year, the state government has asked them to fill all seats through the PMET. Fifty per cent seats are meant for Sikh students only and these two institutes were conducting their own entrance test for the same.

The notification issued by the Department of Medical Education and Research on April 25 says, “The seats of the state quota in government institutes and that of the government quota in private institutes shall be filled out of the candidates as per their merit in the PMET-2005.” The notification further states, “The government has not been approached by the association of all private institutes for the conduct of the entrance test on their own for filling of the seats in management/minority quota. No institution except the Christian Medical College and Dental College, Ludhiana, has been established for more than 25 years and are conducting their own entrance test subject to the permission by the admission supervision committee.”

The Baba Farid University of Health Sciences shall organise the PMET for 2005 on June 5.

Dr Mohan Verghese, Principal, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, said here today, “We have not accepted the plea of the state government and will conduct our own entrance test on May 22 for admission to the MBBS and BDS courses. We will admit all students on the basis of our own test as we have been doing in the past.”

Dr Verghese further said that they would be meeting the Justice G.R. Majithia Committee against the decision of the state government. Moreover, he said, their plea is pending with the Supreme Court and final arguments have already been held. “We are waiting for the judgement,” he added.

The CMC management had gone to the Supreme Court last year against the decision of the Majithia Committee and got interim relief and the case was later referred to the larger bench.

Dr Ujjagar Singh Dhaliwal, Principal, Sri Guru Ramdas Institute of Medical Sciences, Amritsar, said they were approaching the state government and the Majithia Committee to seek permission for the holding of entrance test for 50 per cent seats of Sikh students under the minority status. A delegation of the SGPC has already met Capt Amarinder Singh and sought his intervention in the matter.

Last year, the two institutes had conducted their own entrance for the admission of Sikh students under the minority status.

Meanwhile, the Union Government issued a notification on January 18, declaring Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists and Parsis as minority communities. This notification has been issued in the wake of the establishment of the National Commission for Minority Educational Institutions Act 2004.

Prof Prithipal Singh Kapoor, former Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Guru Nanak Dev University and a member of the standing monitoring committee for educational institutions run by the minorities in India, says,’ The notification will help the Sikh institutions run by the SGPC and Christian institutions like the CMC, Ludhiana, in retaining their status as national minorities.

Dr Dhaliwal regretted that the Justice Majithia Committee had not fixed the tuition fee for the MBBS and BDS courses so far. Only provisional fee was fixed last year and this year again at the rate of Rs 75,000 for MBBS per annum and Rs 50,000 for the BDS course. How could they run the institutes with such meagres fee he asked. The management of Sri Guru Ramdas Institutes has sought Rs 2 lakh for the MBBS and Rs 1 lakh for the BDS course, respectively.

The Punjab and Haryana High Court last year had asked the state government to finalise the fee structure by October 11, 2004, but the same had not been done so far, he said. The fee for the NRI students has been fixed at $ 75,000 for the MBBS course. Fifteen per cent seats are reserved for the NRI quota.

The DMC management charges Rs 70,000 per annum as fee for the MBBS course and Dr Verghese claimed, “We have the lowest fee and we do not admit any NRI students nor charge capitation fee.”

The Justice Majithia Committee is likely to submit its report on fee structure very shortly. The committee has heard the parents of the students, managements and the government representatives.

The DMCH Ludhiana admits 75 students on the basis of the PMET. Out of this, 15 per cent seats are for the NRI students.



Ludhiana CMC goal is it charity or commerce

Christian Medical College (CMC) and Hospital and Dayanand Medical College (DMC) and Hospital are situated at the opposite ends in Ludhiana, which has two other hospitals and about 100 major private clinics as well. Though CMC was born in March 1957, its origin dates back to January 1895. It was Dr Dame Edith Mary Brown, who set up a medical school in a rented building, as the place already had an American Presbyterian Mission Centre. As head of the women missionaries, she found a willing helping hand in Miss Greenfield, a Scottish woman, who later loaned a 30-bed hospital for the medical centre in memory of her sister, Bessie. And she also assisted Dr Brown in administration and care of the students. Initially, there were four students, two dispensers and 15 nurses.

Dr Brown would pay four annas to attract midwives, untrained dais, in the age group of 20 to 80, where they learned, for the first time, the need for cleanliness and also to call a doctor. She managed to drive plough-share through the tangled roots of poverty, illiteracy, ignorance and superstition.

Having worked through the vicissitudes of time and events, like the great plague epidemic of 1901-02, the Kangra and Quetta earthquakes, which added strength to the determination of Dr Brown and her mission, her work earned her the Government of Indias award first the silver and later the gold Kaiser-i-Hind. Even the British Crown named her a Dame Commander of the British Empire. She retired to Kashmir in 1948 and died there in 1956. But Dr Brown still lives as much in the memory of people as in the labyrinth lanes of the city and the red-brick-structures of the old and the modern CMC, spread over 50 acres. Even today some fondly call the present CMC Brown Hospital.

Interestingly, Brown Hospital cared and treated only women and children for 50 years. Then on Independence, communal passions that resulted in a great loss of life and tragedies, changed it all. For the first time the hospital opened its doors to men. There was no looking back.

Besides the three colleges Medical, Dental and Nursing CMC has a 785-bed hospital with multi-speciality facilities, a 110-bed critical care unit and a state-of-the-art medicare technology that goes with any tertiary care hospital. Earlier this year, CMC celebrated the Golden Jubilee of its MBBS course. It has now plans to increase intake of these three colleges that attract students from all over the country. CMC conducts its own admission examinations. Its MBBS tuition fee is around Rs 70,000 plus some essential charges and there is no capitation fee. CMC needs more hostels, particularly for dental college students, apart from a staff residential colony.

The Medical Superintendent, Dr John Abraham, says, If we were the pioneers to initiate renal transplant, dialysis, open heart surgery, micro-vascular surgery, chest/lung surgery, paediatrics surgery, cancer chemotherapy, cardiac cath lab, CT scan (spiral), radiotherapy and emergency and trauma centre, we also have today a string of 27 specialities and super-specialities. A visit to the emergency and trauma centre revealed that it has 25 beds with provision for further expansion and two fully equipped resuscitation rooms and 12 beds fitted with cardiac monitors.

CMC is once again striving to refurbish its old image of a charitable institution, restore peoples confidence, consolidate and expand its sphere of medicare. It has managed to salvage its credibility and credentials after having passed through a rough, bad patch that lasted between mid-80s and 1996-97.

The Medical Superintendent says, That sloppy period was due to combination of several factors, internal as well as external and, of course, connivance of circumstances. As a consequence, some top faculty had left the institution, intake of patients had dipped and liabilities had mounted. Then there was a change of guard at the management level. The things are now looking up. The Director, Dr Silas J Charles, is introducing medicare and management changes and importing to CMC the latest in medical science.

This change was fairly evident from the role that CMC played during the past and recent mishaps the Khanna train accident, the Jalandhar MIG-21 crash, the Khud-Mohalla fire, the Frontier Mail tragedy and even the Gujarat earthquake.

But the Brown Memorial Hospital Employees Union General Secretary, Mr V M Frederick, disputes that things are looking up. He is sore over the absence of the Director, who is stay put for most of the year in the USA. He also talks of a major shift in the hospitals mission statement from charity to commerce or shedding its secular image or denial of service benefits to the employees. He refers to the coterie that runs the day-to-day affairs of the institution. All these factors have contributed to the woes of the employees, who are denied their dues and have often been forced to take course to legal remedies.

Mr Frederick is also unhappy with the dispute settlement mechanism as it denies the employees an access to the governing body. While, senior doctors and management representatives claimed that there were neither any major outstanding demands nor any unrest, Mr Frederick countered saying that the union was not satisfied with the mechanism for the redress of the grievances and several employees had been denied their financial dues, just as some patients in the low cost ward were not cared.

Dr Abraham, however, proudly talks of poor patient care under which Rs 2 to 3 crore worth free medicare is given to the poor sick. At least 5 per cent of the total budget or 20 per cent of the hospital fees goes into the care of the poor, who cannot afford, and are admitted to the low cost or Brown ward. But the union leader remains skeptical of this claim!

CMCs Smile Train Cleft Clinic is as unique as its department of Plastic Surgery or Adolescent Clinic. Dr Vijay Obed has performed over 300 surgeries to correct cleft lip and palate, since January 2001. This deformity affects one baby in every 700 born. Each year some 35,000 children are born with cleft deformity and only 10,000 receive medical treatment and the remaining go about their life without ever being able to smile, he added.

A Senior Consultant and Head, Nephrology, Dr Basant Pawar, says there is a Cadaver Transplant Act and also broad regulations. He wants the government to make these applicable. On cadaver transplant, he says no religious concerns are involved.

CMC, he says, is now focusing on diabetes, which will affect at least 20 million people in the next five years of which about 20 per cent will develop kidney complications, including renal failure. Then there is a group of diseases that attack the immune system. We are not in the business of profit-making. We are now laying stress on cancer, haematology, heart diseases, endocrine medicine, radiation oncology, urology, gastroenterology etc.

CMC is preparing to apply for a certification by the National Accreditation for Blood Banks and Laboratories, which audits technology and techniques of testing blood and other samples. CMC is also forging foreign tie-ups for teaching and research and is out to computerise its medical management systems and introduce tele-medical services through networking of its hospitals and clinics in a radius of 50 km. Plans for medical education and informatics and quick service for lab tests are on the anvil, including a programme for film-less x-rays, MRIs, CT-scans etc.

CMC finances are shrouded in mystery. Officials say that the finances flow from various fees and donations received at home and abroad. There is a Friends of Ludhiana group as also a US board. The annual budget is close to Rs 55 crore. There are CMC alumni in several countries. The figures of out patient (52,000 in 2002-03) and inpatient (20,000 in 2002-03) and casualties treated (16,000 in 2002-03) or 400-odd bed occupancy per day at CMC makes an impressive reading. These figures are cited as an example of how CMC is looking up now.

Others say that a former Executive Director of the CMC Board, Dr Charles Reynolds, had collected over US $ 30 million during his 30 months stay. The crux of the matter is that as a minority institution, CMC is not starved of funds and the goodwill Brown Hospital or CMC has built over the last one century has enabled it to keep its financial quotient flowing. It also enjoys duty-free import facility and name any equipment, CMC, probably, has it.

The faculty is not permitted private practice and 170-odd faculty seems contented and nursing care is appreciable, leaving aside aberrations here or there.

The Deputy Medical Superintendent, Dr Rajeev Kapoor, says that CMC is reaching out to villages. Our retrieval service is expected to take-off shortly as the paramedics who are to run a 15-man squad are under six-week training from experts in the UK.

One unique feature of CMCs emergency and trauma services and wards is the provision for wheel-in patient trolleys in case of disasters. It provides oxygen, suction and ventilation to several patients, simultaneously. Similarly, the mobike paramedic or commandos are well equipped with life-saving essentials, as in the UK where from the idea is being replicated here. This 15-man squad on mobikes will reach an accident site much earlier than can an ambulance. A special ambulance, an operation theatre on wheels, is also being equipped, as back-up support to the mobike squad. For this CMC has been allotted 104 as the emergency telephone call number.

Perhaps, the most outstanding features of CMC will be its proposed Rs 200-crore Medicity project at Rania and Rs 14 crore 7-storeyed hospital complex for housing the super-specialities on the main hospital campus. This building will have a helipad at the roof. The building plans for the two projects are ready. However, work on the 7-storeyed building is stuck up in the Ludhiana Municipal Corporation, which has been embroiled in the usual red-tape syndrome with CMC over petty issues for the past six months.

For the Medicity, 20 acres were donated by Mr Ghansham Singh Lotey to set up a complex in memory of his father. The Medicity will deal with deadly diseases, like AIDS, thalassemia and cancer, besides having five units for facilities in medical, surgical and diagnostic clinics. A rehabilitation centre for the physically challenged children and a hospice unit will ensure gentle care for the terminally ill patients.

CMC, striving to get the status of deemed university, is undertaking several social research projects and is keen on cancer registry for Punjab with help from the government, NGOs, individuals and institutions for networking to make the region disease-free. All this, despite the inherent infirmities and the discordant notes within CMC.

Ludhiana boy tops AIIMS test

Brijesh Takkar never imagined that he would top in almost every medical entrance examination he would appear in. This Ludhiana lad has done the city proud by topping in the medical entrance examination to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, CBSE PMT, etc. In short, he breezed through every test that he took.

“I always knew that I would do well, but I am still pinching myself to check if this is a dream or a reality”, Brijesh told The Tribune here today. Though, he was aware of other results earlier, the AIIMS result was declared in New Delhi late last evening. Both his parents and his two sisters are medical graduates.

Though Brijesh was confident of getting through the test, but he had never thought he would do it with such a bang. ‘‘Last night at around 10.30, I received a call from our family friends, who congratulated me on getting the first rank. I thought they were talking about the results of the entrance test conducted by the Christian Medical College (CMC), Ludhiana, the results of which were also declared last evening.

“‘It was only later during the course of conversation, I realised that they were congratulating me for the AIIMS result, of which I was not even aware of. I was pleasantly shocked and could not believe it till I called up someone else in New Delhi and asked him to confirm,’’ said the much elated boy.

However, success is not new to Brijesh. This year he has also been the topper in the entrance tests to the CMC and Banaras Hindu University (BHU). He has also attained the third rank in the Mahatama Gandhi Medical Sciences and Research Institute, Vadodara, the results of which were also declared today. He attained the first position in Punjab and the 41st in India in the Pre-Medical Test conducted by the Central Board of Secondary Education. He had also received a call from Washington University for further studies this year on the recommendation of his school principal. But, unfortunately, he could not go as the dates clashed with the Plus-Two CBSE exams in March this year, in which he had topped in Punjab with 94.6 per cent marks.

Brijesh is also drawing a scholarship which he got for clearing the National Talent Search Examination (NTSE) two years back. He even cleared the Olympiad written test in biology this year and was invited to Mumbai, but he could not go their last month as he was busy preparing for the various entrance tests.

Even though Brijesh wants to become a neurologist, he says that he would take a final decision only after he completes the MBBS. He owes his success to his parents, both running a nursing home in Ludhiana, and his two sisters, both pursuing their medical degrees here. “Without their guidance, I would have not been able to make it. My school teachers too had been very helpful. They helped me solve my problems whenever I approached them,” he said.

But Brijesh strongly believes that it is sheer hard work that pays in the long run. “What is even more important is to channelise the way you work. And I believe that it is not just self-study but the right coaching that puts you on the track that leads to success. Most importantly, one has to set his targets and be firm on achieving them,” he said while offering his mantra to other students who want to follow his footsteps.




CMC Dy Director refutes claim

The Deputy Director of Christian Medical College Ludhiana, Dr T.M. Jaison, has claimed that only a few professors have left the institution, from among its huge faculty, further denying that there was any exodus from the institute. He was reacting to a news report ‘Exodus of doctors from CMC’ published in Ludhiana Tribune yesterday.

Dr Jaison said that Dr Sharad Ramdas and his wife Dr Anita Ramdas continued to be on the rolls of CMC till date, contrary to the published report. He said that the CMC would always remain committed to provide the best medical care to the patients and that irrespective of the minor reshuffling, the CMC still had an expert faculty.



Symposium on prostate diseases

The Dr L.H. Lobo Memorial Trust has been organising the Lobo memorial oration and a scientific symposium at the Christian Medical College and Hospital. The CMC has organised a scientific symposium as part of the annual day function every year for the past 18 years for the advancement of medical education in memory of the late Dr L.H. Lobo, an eminent and renowned orthopaedic surgeon and former principal of the Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, said Dr S.K. Chopra, honorary secretary, Dr L.H. Lobo Memorial trust.

This year the 19th annual function will be held on November 3, at the CMC Hospital Auditorium, according to Dr Kim Mammen, organising secretary and Head of the Urology Department, CMCH.

Dr Lionel Henry Lobo was principal of Christian Medical College, Ludhiana, from 1971 to 1982. Besides being a renowned orthopaedic surgeon and professor, he is remembered by his students, patients, colleagues, friends, followers and the citizens of Ludhiana for the exemplary ways he guided Christian Medical College towards academic excellence and achievements, for administrative wisdom, ideal fellowship and overall for his quest for furtherance of medical education, Dr Chopra reiterated.

Padma Shri Prof Mahendra Rhandari, eminent urologist and director of the Sanjay Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), Lucknow, will be the orator and chief guest. The title of the oration will be “medical education for tomorrow”. A symposium on prostate cancer, “New insights for an old disease” will also be held the same day after the oration. Eminent experts in this field will participate in this symposium. Dr S.K. Sharma, Director, PGI, Chandigarh, Dr A.S. Bawa, Prof and Head of Surgery, GMCH, Chandigarh, Dr S.K. Singh, Associate Professor, Department of Urology, PGI, Chandigarh, Dr A.K. Homal, Prof of Urology, AIIMS, New Delhi, Dr M.K. Mahajan, Prof and Head, Department of Radiology, CMC, Ludhiana, and Dr Kim Mammen will participate in this symposium.

Dr Kim Mammen pointed out that with an increasing ageing population the early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer has become very important and critical symptoms usually manifest when the prostate cancer reaches the late stage. These patients can present symptoms of urinary obstruction, backache or spinal problems due to malignant spread of the disease. Various tests and investigations are now available to detect early prostate cancer which is not symptomatic, and cure can be achieved with prompt treatment.


Profile


The Christian Medical College, Ludhiana Society (Regd.) is a Christian Educational and Research Institution established, maintained and administered by Christian Churches and Christian agencies in India.

In 1953 the college started the MBBS program affiliated with Panjab University, Chandigarh admitting men and women students. Since July 1999 the college has been affiliated with Baba Farid University of Health Sciences, Faridkot. The Post-graduate program started in the Sixties. The college offers Post-graduate Diploma, Degree, Super specialty and Doctoral courses.



PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES


Christian Medical College Ludhiana Society, on behalf of the Church, seeks to contribute to the health needs of India by training primarily Christian Medical, Dental, Nursing and other health professional students and by providing holistic health services to the community and the nation, with people of the Christian faith serving in Christ’s name alongside with those of other faiths, who identify with these aims and goals.

In fulfilment of this objective the Society has established the Institution (Christian Medical College, Christian Dental College, College of Nursing, College of Physiotherapy, Hospitals and other units) as a Christian Institution in name, content and character.

In furtherance of the above affirmations, the Christian Medical College, Christian Dental College, College of Nursing, Hospitals and other units are administered as an educational and research Institution of an all India character, run, managed and administered by Christian men and women as health professionals, to the highest standards and in the spirit of Jesus Christ, for the healing ministry of the Church in India.

Staff of all faiths shall live and serve together in the Institution in an atmosphere of mutual respect, trust and love.

In this atmosphere of mutual trust and understanding, all the staff shall together strive to create a climate of excellence that is marked by a sense of God’s presence and action in their corporate ministry in the Institution.





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