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Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, Delhi


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Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, Delhi
Address: Plot / Street / Area
New Mehrauli Road
New Delhi (District New Delhi)
Delhi, India
Pin Code : 110067


Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Delhi is a University recognised by UGC. Status: Central University.
Jawaharlal Nehru University is situated in New Delhi of Delhi state (Province) in India. This data has been provided by www.punjabcolleges.com. New Delhi comes under New Delhi Tehsil, New Delhi District.

Fax # of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Delhi is 26742580, 26717601.

email ID(s) is Jawaharlal Nehru University New Delhi Delhi

Website of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Delhi is www.jnu.ac.in.


Contact Details of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Delhi are : Telephone: +91-11-26742676, 26742575, 26741557

Introduction
Young at thirty years, as universities go, what has lent strength and energy to Jawaharlal Nehru University is the vision that ideas are a field for adventure, experimentation and unceasing quest and diversity of opinions its chief premise. In the early 1970s, when JNU opened its doors to teachers and students, frontier disciplines and new perspectives on old disciplines were brought to the Indian university system. The excellent teacher-student ratio at 1:10, a mode of instruction which encouraged students to explore their own creativity instead of reproducing received knowledge, and an exclusively internal evaluation were a new experiment on the Indian academic landscape; these have stood the test of time. The very Nehruvian objectives embedded in the founding of the University, national integration, social justice, secularism, the democratic way of life, international understanding and scientific approach to the problems of society had built into it constant and energetic endeavour to renew knowledge through self-questioning.

The once rugged terrain of the Aravali hill range, where the 1000 -acre campus is housed is now lush green. Parts of it host dense forests, sustaining a birdwatcher's paradise and some forms of wild life.

The JNU campus is a microcosm of the Indian nation, drawing students from every nook and corner of the country and from every group and stratum of society. To make sure that this is so, annual admission tests are simultaneously held at 37 centres spread across the length and breadth of the country, and special care is taken to draw students from the underprivileged castes and ethic groups by reserving 22.5 per cent of seats for them. Overseas students form some 10 percent of the annual intake. Students' hostels and blocks of faculty residences are interspersed with one another, underlining the vision of a large Indian family.

Even as class room teaching and, work in the library and the laboratories have their share in the mode of instruction, personal interaction between students and teachers and among students themselves form an extremely important and lively medium of generation and transmission of knowledge. Sometimes high decibel disputes about the validity of theoretical premises or cultural substructures of a particular scientific or economic thesis do spill over from the class and hostel rooms onto the middle of the campus roads, at times causing traffic bottlenecks. Happily, these have never caused a road accident! The annual Students Union elections are conducted entirely by students. Fierce poster and cartoon wars, verbal duels and competitive yet peaceful group meetings are a viewers' delight during the elections. Violence is the only alien on the campus.

Several Centres in these Schools have been declared by the UGC to be Centres of 'Excellence'. These are Centre for Historical Studies, Centre for the Study of Social Systems, Centre for Political Studies, Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, Centre for the Study of Regional Development, all in the School of Social Sciences. In addition three Science Schools--School of Physical Sciences, School of Life Sciences and School of Environmental Sciences have also received the UGC recognition as Centers for Excellence.

Vission
The first nearly thirty years of JNU's existence were marked by the institution of new disciplines and the conceptualisation of old disciplines in new perspectives. The focus in these years has been on interdisciplinary research and teaching. Thus JNU envisaged Centres in place of Departments and Schools in place of Faculties. This has stood JNU in good stead and its concepts and perspectives have had a degree of percolating effect in several other universities.

However, thirty years on, when ever new forms of knowledge and newer forms of creating and diffusing knowledge have evolved and newer problematiques have come into focus, it is important to renew our knowledge systems by taking cognisance of the rapid changes occurring. We have already taken steps for establishment of new Centres/Schools focused on what are now frontline disciplines. These are:

* Special Centre for Molecular Medicine
* School of Information Technology
* Centre for the Study of Law and Governance

Centre for Molecular Medicine will be the nucleus around which a School of Medicine would evolve over the next ten years. This is not envisaged as a replica of MBBS degree awarding Medical Colleges but as primarily a centre of highly specialised basic research with the study of molecules being its chief concern. It is through this study that society will obtain help to combat dreaded genetic diseases like cancer, heart ailments, rheumatic diseases etc.

The School of Information Technology would bring us to the forefront of the most modern way of dissemination of knowledge. IT facilities are already available at three locales on the Campus. These will constitute the nucleus of a very large programme which will create, impart training, and use IT networks to establish interlinkages first within JNU, then within the city's institutions, and finally worlwide. The plan is to turn JNU into a virtual university thus providing and opening access to the academic resources world wide.

The Centre for the Study of Law and Governance is a new concept. By its nature a multi-disciplinary centre, it involves the disciplines of history, sociology, political science, economics and philosophy at the very outset. Its foci are spread out: from the management of institutions - public and private, political, social and economic - to the management of the social order. It would also involve the study of the problems of work culture, and human rights. Its relevance is both immediate and long term; and inherent in it are both academic and social concerns. We also intend to experiment with making joint appointments between this Centre and other concerned centres. If a faculty member from existing centres wishes to participate in the creation and development of this Centre, we should welcome the initiative; we could also make appointments of faculty jointly in this as well as some other centres. If the experiment succeeds, we plan to extend it to other centres and schools as well.

Besides, we have the intention of establishing a world class JNU Institute of Advanced Study. This would be open to scholars around the world, irrespective of nationality, gender, or any other distinguishing marker, and to all disciplines. Excellence of the research project and of the scholar's c.v. would be the sole criteria. This would be a place where a scholar, needing a break from his/her routine and planning some uninterrupted research for a few months to a year or two would be welcome. We plan to provide such scholars an Indian Professor's salary, residential accommodation and world class infrastructural facilities.

But recognition of frontline disciplines would not bind us to the significance of the more classical areas of study. JNU has taken steps for establishment of a Centre for Sanskrit Studies and a Centre of Philosophy. We expect these two centres to have a wide ranging interaction with the School of Language, Literature and Civlization Studies and the School of Social Sciences.

Some thinking has also been initiated to establish a School of Indological Studies around the Centre of Indian Languages and the Centre for Sanskrit Studies by introducing courses in classical and modern Indian languages and literatures. These courses will link very usefully with the study of classical Greek a Chair for which has already been endowed and Hebrew, endowment for which is under consideration for installation from July 2000. This should be the only School of its kind in India and will attract scholars from within India and internationally.

Proposed New Disciplines:
The Study of Globalization

By its nature a multi-disciplinary and a brand new emerging area, it would involve interaction among the disciplines of economics, history, sociology, gender studies, political science and philosophy among the social sciences. It would pay attention to the study of human rights. It would also include the study of global ecology as part of environmental sciences and literature and arts of diaspora as part of humanities.

Mathematical Modelling
This should engage both in preparing the methodology of modelling and actual modelling of various problematiques, be it economy, ecology, biology, population, or crime. It should also engage itself in chaos and complexity studies.

National Security
There already is a very small programme in operation at JNU dealing with some issues of national security other than defence. The issues of security that would be of concern to us at JNU comprise food, energy, environment and security against natural disasters. It would also involve studying problems of interdependence and conflict in a fast changing world.

Comparative Culture Studies
The chief emphasis in the system of higher education in India over the past century has been on the location of any problematique in a single discipline or a single frame of reference, even as episodic endeavours in comparative studies have yielded very positive results.

It is therefore important to put this endeavour on an institutional footing encompassing a wide range of themes and disciplines. 'Culture' would be inclusive of social sciences, literatures, humanities and international relations.

JNU also plan to establish a JNU Institute of Advanced Study offering Fellowships of up to a year's duration to scholars around the world irrespective of nationality and in all disciplines. Some fellowships may be earmarked for a collective project, either proposed by a group or by the IAS itself, for up to two years. The IAS would offer an Indian Professor's salary, a small self-contained flat and world class infrastructural support.

Programmes:
The most rapidly evolving research scenario today is in the area of life sciences, bioinformatics and biotechnology. A high level concerted effort is required for keeping pace with these developments. JNU has in existence a highly regarded faculty at the School of Life Sciences and the Centre for Bio-Technology, and is hoping to appoint new faculty in the recently established Centre for Molecular Medicine.

The new areas that need special attention in these sciences are: Functional Genomics and Proteomics, Structural Biology, Gene Therapy and Vaccinology, Transgenic Plants and Animals, Environmental Biotechnology, Tissue Engineering and Downstream Processing

Study of Nanotechnology
Polymeric materials: gels, networks, glasses, clusters of polymers and biopolymers and complexes. Nano-particles (polymer and semiconductor)

Water Sciences
It has sometimes been predicted that international wars in the 21st century will be centred on control over water. Even if this seems too harsh a prophecy, the question of water is going to be one of the major areas of social need and tension. This implies both quantity and quality of water. It also implies the study of water in all its resources, mountains, sky, land and oceans.

JNU would like to make it a specialised discipline where interaction among faculty in the School of Environmental Sciences, Centre for Studies in Regional Development, Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, both in the School of Social Sciences would form the base of activity. Work would start with the Ganga system for studying the quantity and quality of water, melt water behaviour, soil moisture measurements, ecohydrology, environment impact analysis etc. and extend to other water systems as it develops

Comparative Area Studies
in the context of International Relations. It would provide institutional support for collaborative research for area specialists working on similar themes in different geographical-cultural contexts

India Heritage Series comprising three inter-related units:
1. 100 Masterpieces of Indian Civilisation in multi-lingual and multi-media translations into Indian, Asian and European languages

2. The Linguistic Heritage of India, with focus on rescuing and preserving endangered languages belonging to the Austro-Asiatic, Tibeto-Burman and Tibeto-Himalayan language families spoken by linguistic minorities across the country, particularly in states like Meghalaya, Bihar, Jharkhand, M.P., U.P., Uttaranchal, H.P. and J&K.

3. India: Reception Studies. The programme willcompile and index material on India in all five official languages of the U.N. and Arabic, Portuguese and Italian.

Holistic Medicine-Epidemiology Programme.This programme would undertake the study of the concepts and methodological issues of a range of alternative medical traditions operative in India and would seek to develop a holistic paradigm within epidemiology. JNU already has a functioning Centre for the Study of Social Medicine and Community Health as well as a Centre for Studies in Science Policy. There is besides the School of Life Sciences. The programme could draw upon the resources of all of these.

History of Science, Technology and Medicine.Here too some expertise exists in four of our Centres and the School of Life Sciences: the two mentioned above, and the Centre for Historical Studies and Zakir Husain Centre for Educational Studies. A separate programme in which all these could collaborate and develop it further would add enormously to the value of this academic discipline.

Global Presence
These are some of the areas in which the participating universities' interest and expertise could be ascertained for collaboration and sharing of knowledge. This could possibly be used as a starting point for identifying broad areas for establishing a presence on the internet. In this context, the following possibilities could be considered

* Sharing of courses on broad themes of general interest.
* Lectures on selected areas.
* Sharing research resources.
* Identification of globally meaningful themes and placement of necessary data for it.

The technological revolution witnessed during the recent past has made the knowledge produced at global level easily accessible. A transition from accessibility to activate interaction and cross fertilization is perhaps the desirable change which now needs collective consideration and realization. Accessibility when confined to sharing information serves only a limited purpose; sharing does not necessarily lead to furthering knowledge which to a great extent is contingent upon creative dialogue. The global network envisaged by the Rector Group is likely to contribute to this transition by creating a forum for "bumping divergent insights against one another".

A sensitivity to the epistemological and cultural context in which knowledge is produced is a necessary pre-requisite for a meaningful dialogue. The historical experience and contemporary compulsions are so powerful and variegated that a universalized view is likely to miss out important nuances. This is a factor knowledge sharing is likely to miss out and creative dialogue would underline.

In the light of these two important dimensions, the preliminary task of the proposed network appears to be the creation of an academic infra-structure not only to bring together the existing knowledge in the participating universities but also to provide a forum for active critical dialogue on problems of global significance. The differing perspectives on these problems based on national experiences and epistemological assumptions would be the ground for advancement.

The initial step in this direction would be the documentation of the existing resources of the participating universities. The web masters of the universities could meet together to review and discuss these resources and to identify significant thematic areas. On the basis of this identification, working groups may be constituted to prepare specific proposals.

In the absence of the academic profile of the participating universities, it is premature at this stage to think about areas or perhaps even about the specific nature of programs. Yet, suggestions in the memorandum appear to be useful starting point on which the meeting could build a more detailed structure.

The graduate level seminars and Rector Group lectures are interesting ideas. Needless to say, success and acceptability would largely depend upon the care with which the topics are selected. It is useful in this context to raise the question about criteria for selecting the topics. They should be chosen not only to stimulate debate but also to incorporate ongoing and future research in the participating universities. JNU is a member of International Association of Universities. The web site of the association is http://www.unesco.org/
the activities of them can be found on the internet site . JNU is also member of the association of Universities in developing Commonwealth countries and the site is http://www.acu.ac.uk/ . From the point of view of JNU, some of the specific areas of interest in social science are: Sustainable development, Environmental protection, Modernization, Culture: Domination and resistance, Human rights and Terrorism. The areas of interest in applied sciences would be Bio-engineering, computer tutoring Systems for teaching and machine-aided Translated Systems. The identification of these and other areas in future would depend upon corresponding interest in participating universities.

Click to see the list of Foreign Universities/Institutions with which MOU for academic collaboration have been signed

Recognised Institutes
JNU has granted recognition and accreditation to the following prestigious institutions across the country. This has added to the true national character of the University. Representatives of these Institutions serve on various academic and statutory bodies of the JNU. Similarly, JNU faculty also participate in the academic bodies of these Institutions.

Defence Institutions
* Army Cadet College, Dehradun
* College of Military Engineering, Pune
* Military College of Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Secunderabad
* Military College of Telecommunication Engineering, Mhow
* National Defence Academy, Pune
* Naval College of Engineering, Lonavala

Research and Development Institutions
* Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad
* Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram
* Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow
* Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow
* Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh
* International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi
* National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi
* Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi
* Raman Research Institute, Bangalore
* National Institute of Plant Genome Research, New Delhi

Disclaimer
This is the official website of Jawaharlal Nehru University. This disclaimer governs your use of the JNU website; by using the website you accept this disclaimer in full.

The material in this website is provided free of charge, and you acknowledge that it would not be reasonable to hold JNU liable in respect of this website and the information on this website.

All the information in the website has been produced and processed from sources believed to be reliable. No warranty, express or implied, is made regarding accuracy, adequacy, completeness, legality, reliability or usefulness or any information.

While we endeavor to ensure that the information on this website is correct, JNU does not warrant its completeness, its accuracy, nor does it commit to ensuring that the website remains available or that material on this website is kept updated. All the information has been produced and processed from sources believed to be reliable. This disclaimer applies to both isolated and aggregate uses of information available on the websites.

In no event shall the University Web, programs, employees, be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, loss of use, data) however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict, vicarious liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way out of the use of this system, even if advised of the possibility of such damage. This disclaimer of liability applies to any damage, including but not limited to those caused by any failure of performance, error, omission, interruption, deletion, computer virus, communication line failure, unauthorized access to, alteration of, or use of record, tortuous behavior, negligence or under any other cause of action. However, nothing in this disclaimer shall exclude or limit any liability which cannot be excluded or limited under Indian Laws.

The information available on the JNU website is subject to change without any prior notice. Users to the site are advised to contact the concerned office of Jawaharlal Nehru University for update. Data can also quickly become out of date. It is recommended that careful attention is paid to the contents of any data associated with a file, and that the originator of the data or information be contacted with any questions regarding appropriate use. Any information provided does not constitute advice and should not be relied upon in making (or refraining from making) any decision. Jawaharlal Nehru University neither promises nor guarantees its accuracy or correctness or reliability.

The University Web has links to other Web sites. The Jawaharlal Nehru University web site may contain information that is created and maintained by a variety of sources both internal and external to the University. These sites are unmoderated forums containing the personal opinions and other expressions of the persons who post entries. The Jawaharlal Nehru University does not control, monitor or guarantee the information contained in these sites or information contained in links to other external web sites, and does not endorse any views. In no event shall the Jawaharlal Nehru University be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any such content available on or through any such site or resource.

Unless otherwise stated, we or our licensor own the intellectual property rights in the website and material on the website. Due to the dynamic nature of the Internet, the user expressly agrees that use of the University Web is at the user's sole risk. Jawaharlal Nehru University does not warrant that the service will be uninterrupted or error free. The documents and related graphics published on this Web or server could contain technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Jawaharlal Nehru University and /or its respective units and programs may make improvements and/ or changes in the information and/ or programs described herein at any time. Any errors or discrepancy may be informed to Jawaharlal Nehru University at webmaster@mail.jnu.ac.in

JNU may revise this disclaimer from time to time. Please check this page regularly to ensure you are familiar with the current version.

This notice will be governed in accordance with Indian Law and any dispute relating to this notice shall be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of Indian Courts.

Registrar
Prof. V. K. Jain
Registrar & Dean of Students
Jawaharlal Nehru University
New Delhi-110 067, India

: Off. (Registrar): + 91-11-26704005, 26704111
Email: registrar@mail.jnu.ac.in

: Off. (Dean of Students): + 91-11-26704554, 26741523

E-mail : vkj0400@mail.jnu.ac.in , vkj0400@hotmail.com

Website: http://www.jnu.ac.in/Faculty/vkjain/

Alumni
Reaching out to University Alumni: JNU is proud to have as its alumni a collective of more than 80,000 social scientists, scientists civil servants, literary critics, media experts, foreign language experts, journalists, political leaders, social activists, technologists, managers and entrepreneurs over the last 35 years and more. This number will continue to grow. The University has established a Standing committee for Alumni Relations and International Linkages (SCRAIL) under the chairmanship of the Vice-Chancellor since 2003. Currently, Prof. Anand Kumar is the Chief Advisor, Alumni & Placements.

SCARIL aims to foster stronger relations between its alumni and others connected with the University. JNU recognizes its alumni as important stakeholders in its continuing quest to provide excellent education. It realises the enormous benefits that can come from the engagement and support of its alumni who have considerable expertise in many areas and can help identify strategic directions for JNU in the 21st century.

The alumni can provide opportunities for community service, act as goodwill ambassadors for JNU, serve as effective interlocutors, provide advice and support to the university, suggest frontline research areas, offer career advice and also provide financial assistance. There can also be academic and technical collaboration in research and projects.

Through this office we have established links with JNU alumni and several JNU alumni associations in different parts of India and abroad. We have already produced a directory of nearly 5000 alumni which is available online. But we have to expedite the process to cover the remaining alumnus as soon as possible. Any alumna can get included in this directory by sending us details at alumnus@mail.jnu.ac.in

The A&P office of the JNU is also committed to help establish links between various prospective employers and JNU students through their respective schools and centres. Various placement agencies and universities have already contacted us for this purpose.

Near Future: JNU�s Vision
JNU is a leading national centre of excellence in higher education which is trying to rank among the top universities of the world. We, at JNU, believe in excellence with social responsibility and commitment, and wish to become a bench mark for Indian universities.

JNU has evolved mainly as a research oriented university with emphasis on post graduate teaching. Out of a total of 5506 on our rolls, 4631 are post graduate students. With hostels and residences of teachers built close together, the university's instructional and research programmes go beyond the classroom and normal office hours. JNU is now well recognized among world class institutions, the only Indian university to find a place in the global ranking of Institutes of Higher Education. A recent survey by Pergmann Press has placed JNU publications in the Sciences as the 4th most cited papers in the country. The University Grants Commission has also identified JNU amongst the few 'University with Potential for Excellence'. JNU has always been the leading Indian university, and perhaps among the best worldwide, in Social Sciences, International Relations, and Languages. The Admission policy and practice of JNU: for equity, access and quality has been rated as the 'Best Practices' by National Institute of Educational Planning and Administration which has published it under its series of publication of Best Practices in Higher Education.

Marching ahead on this solid foundation, the University is concentrating upon some major, carefully identified teaching and research programmes which are also of relevance to national progress and development; programmes that will take JNU to new heights of excellence in the years to come. Recognising the emerging trends in social and economic systems (often simply referred to as globalisation and knowledge society) and the strengthening of interdisciplinary approach to knowledge creation and dissemination, new Research areas and activities are being launched.

� The emerging deeper and stronger interdisciplinary character of research and teaching in forms the new programmes in sciences, These include :

- Launching of Nano-Science and Technology as a new major research and teaching programme integrating several aspects now being pursued separately by groups in School of Physical Sciences, Centre for Biotechnology, School of Environmental Sciences and School of Life Science. Another such integrating programme is the application of common computational approaches and tools to study a range of diverse systems encountered in real life situations ranging from traffic flows, stock market fluctuations to analysis of gene protein regulatory networks. This programme on Study of Complex Systems will bring in inputs from social sciences as well. A new frame work of biological research with confluence of various disciplines of biology and physical sciences and mathematics, faculty members from the School of Life Sciences (SLS), School of Environmental Sciences (SES), School of Physical Sciences (SPS), and Special Centre for Molecular Medicine (SCMM) have come together to form an interdisciplinary group of researchers/educationists to pursue biological problems from the perspective of basic principles of physical sciences, especially of chemistry

Emergence of Knowledge Society and widening connectivity between diverse nations and social and economic systems informs the following new initiatives:

- Research and Studies on emerging issues of Higher Education in Knowledge Society will find an important place in JNU; issues such as access and inclusion, diversity and excellence, gender, institutional and organizational transformation, financing and privatization, migration of knowledge workers will be taken up. Simultaneously the issue of changing structures and content of School Education and its linkages with higher education require will receive attention.

- The changing role and nature of international economic institutions in the management of world economy in the dimensions of trade, environment, technology, knowledge and investments within the framework institutional economics, evolutionary economics along with conventional trade and development theories constitutes a key thrust area of research and teaching. The hitherto neglected dimension of social sector is now acquiring an increasing recognition in International Economics (reflected for example in WTO and UN deliberations). New programmes will receive special attention to equip students to undertake holistic research in international economics incorporating this key social sector perspective. With increasing marketization of many services (and goods) traditionally provided by the state, it has become imperative to develop regulatory structures so that social objectives are still met and therefore economic regulation is being taken up as a key area of research and teaching in the context of a more liberalized international economic framework

- Another new initiative to develop a programme on Holistic Epidemiology for Public Health at the university that could feed into the existing curricula in medical colleges and public health institutions in the country apart from contributing to the policy process and the quality of governance.

- The increasing diffusion of Electronic Media resulting in wide spread connectivity has lead to a research programme focussing on the study of issues of the relationship between media on one hand and social behaviour, political functioning, mobilization of public opinion etc. on the other. It would study the media as a source of critical examination of the Government policies and Society in all related aspects.

Necessity of Indian studies in humanities in a wider diverse national and international perspective has been recognised. This informs the following programmes

- In addition to contemporary Indian History, new initiatives would pay particular attention to situating the Indian experience in a comparative perspective other developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America as also of various advanced countries at a comparable stage of their development and by establishing new posts for non-Indian history (Contemporary, Global histories and East European, Asian, Modern Chinese, Latin American and African histories.

- The study and research programmes in textual tradition will be expanded to develop expertise on Pali and Prakrit textual sources and other classical language & literary traditions such as in Tamil, Kannada and Telugu. The approach would be not to construct merely the historical meta-narrative but to also look at the historical record in terms of regional and local processes. The degree programmes in Hindi and Urdu and diploma in Mass Media will be expanded to cover other major Indian languages. International coverage would be by creation of a Group of Foreign Languages like Greek, Swahili, Hebrew Polish, Czech, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Ukrainian, Kazak, and Uzbek etc for a programme in culture studies as an interdisciplinary research at M.Phil/Ph.D level. Collaborative studies in Museum Studies and Comparative aesthetics is another new initiative.

- Special mention should be made of an important Programme for the Study of Discrimination and Exclusion.

As invaluable inputs to research and education, the University proposes to set up archaeological and history museum, and other specialised resource units such as for Science & Technology Archival Record System, for Health Systems/Services Resource and Research.

The University is enhancing and modernising e its educational and research facilities. The Science Instrumentation Centre is being strengthened and state-of-art audio visual and other teaching aids are being introduced. Wide spread adoption of e-governance and internet connectivity has become a must for JNU. A seminar hall with main auditorium with a capacity to seat 1200 people, with associated guest house of international standards will enable JNU to host many more seminars, conferences and workshops.

A full-fledged International Relations office is envisaged to take full advantage of Memorandum of Understanding and Academic Collaboration agreements signed with 90 universities.

Our building plans include annexes to most of our major Schools, as well as a hundred rooms residence for visiting faculty.

Library
The University Library is a Knowledge Centre which has rich resources mainly in Social Sciences, Humanities and Sciences. It is a nine-storey tower building and has a carpet area of about one lakh sq. ft. It is situated in the midst of the academic complex of the University and is the hub of all the academic activities of the University. Established in 1969, it incorporates the library of the prestigious Indian School of International Studies which was later merged with Jawaharlal Nehru University. The JNU Library is a depository of all Govt. publications and publications of some important International Organisations like WHO, European Union, United Nations and its allied agencies etc. The Library has recently established a CyberLibrary at the Ground Floor with 200 Computers for the students and research scholars to access the available online resources.

To meet the special needs of the visually challenged students of the University, a separate Unit named Helen Keller Unit has been established in the newly renovated Reading Hall at the Ground Floor. Twenty computers and scanners have been installed with screen reading and speech software to facilitate visually challenged scholars in their studies in this special Unit. The Library has subscribed twenty two international online databases covering about 10,000 full text journals. Besides that, access to 4,500 full text scholarly electronic journals from 25 publishers across the globe is available, under the UGC-INFONET E-journals Consortium. Computerized Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) can be accessed from all the Schools/Centres under University Wide Area Network.

Timings
The Library remains open from 9.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. throughout the year and during the examination days, the working hours are extended upto 12 midnight for 45 days each semester. However, the Reading Room, Textbook Section also remains open upto 12 midnight. The General Reading Hall is being kept open round the clock throughout the year. The Library remains closed on three National Holidays and Holi festival each year.

Membership
All students, faculty members and employees of the University are eligible for membership of the Library. The registered members are issued Borrower's Ticket corresponding to their entitlement. JNU Library issue bar-coded library identity cards for students. The entitlement, in terms of the number of books that can be borrowed by the members, are as follows:

Category of Members No. of Borrower Tickets issued

M.Phil/Ph.D Students 6

Master's/Undergraduate 4+2

Part-time Students 2

Faculty members/Officers 12

Staff Members 2

Special Members 2

Collection
The Library has a total collection of 5.45 lakhs, which includes books, serials, non-book materials etc. The faculty publications have been placed at the Ground Floor. The Library subscribes to 965 journals and also receives another 148 journals by way of gift and exchange. The collection is housed subject-wise on different floors under three major streams i.e. Social Sciences, Humanities and Sciences. List of Subscribed Print / Online journals is available at library web page at www.jnu.ac.in.

Library Layout
Basement: Social Sciences Books Collection; Bound Periodicals Collection; Periodicals Unit and Bindery.

Ground Floor: Membership Section; Circulation Counter; Periodicals Display and Reading Hall (Social Sciences & Humanities); Reference books; Readers Services; CyberLibrary; Helen Keller Unit (Visually Challenged Researcher/Scholars); Information Browsing Unit for Faculty Members; Research Scholars Reading Hall; Lockers for M. Phil/Ph. D Students and Catalogue Cabinets.

Mezzanine Floor: Librarian's Chamber; Librarian's Office; Documentation Unit; Social Science Processing and Book Acquisition Unit; Training Room; Library Administration; Text Books and Book Bank Collection; Committee Room; Retro conversion Unit and Automation Unit.

1st Floor: Govt. Documents; Census Publications; UN Documents; Documents of other International Agencies etc. ; Microfilms & Microfiches; Reading room for JNU Professors Emeritus.

2nd & 3rd Floor: Science collection is housed on these floors. 2nd floor : display of new Periodicals titles; Theses & Dissertations ; Reference books and bound volumes of Periodicals (from 1985 onwards). 3rd floor houses books and bound volumes of Periodicals (1969-1984).

4th & 5th Floor: Humanities Collection is housed on these floors. European languages and Literature on 4th floor and Afro-Asian Language and Literature on 5th floor.

6th Floor: Archives on Contemporary History; Back volumes of Language journals.

7th Floor: Press Clippings; Bound volumes of Newspapers; Theses & Dissertations and the Arts & Rare Books Collection.

8th Floor: Russian language collection.

9th Floor: Census Data Centre (Proposed).

Hostels
The University hostel system includes 10 Hostels for Boys and Girls and one complex accommodating married students and one complex is coming up shortly for post Doctoral Fellows. These are spacious, well furnished hostels. Apart from hygienic foods, hostels provides recreational facilities includes TVs, indoor games, health Club, and PCOs etc. Each hostel has its live-in wardens, a member of faculty who administers the hostels.

In view of the limited Hostel Accommodation, the candidates should note that the grant of admission to a programme of study in the University would not ensure allotment of Hostel Accommodation and that the Accommodation will be offered to the eligible applicants subject to availability.

1. All selected students who need hostel accommodation will be required to apply in the prescribed application form obtainable from the Dy. Registrar (Inter Hall Administration) Office of the Dean of Students from 15th July 2004 onwards. The application forms received after the last date (16th August 2004) will be considered by the Dean of Students as he deems fit. Admission in the hostel is in accordance with the merit secured in the Entrance Examination held by the University in the respective programmes of study.

2. Upto 22.5% (15% for SC and 7.5% for ST, (interchangeable, if necessary) and 3% of the seats in the hostels are reserved for the SC/ST and Physically Handicapped candidates respectively. All SC (Boys and Girls) except residents of Delhi will be provided hostel. The SC/ST/PH students are exempted from payment of hostel fee (room rent). This is applicable only to those SC/ST/PH students who are not in receipt of fellowships/ scholarships and whose parents/guardians income is under Rs. 75,000/- per annum.

3. The criteria for allotment of hostel accommodation by the University is as under :

First Priority
(a) Students admitted to a full-time Programme of study and who have passed their qualifying examination from places outside Delhi and are not resident of Delhi excepting those who are admitted to a level at which the student already has a degree or has pursued studies in JNU (at the same level) with hostel accommodation.

(b) Students who have passed their qualifying examinations from Delhi but have stayed in recognized University/College hostels and are not resident of Delhi, subject to their furnishing documentary evidence alongwith hostel application from the Head of the College/Institution to the effect that he/she had been a resident student.

(c) Students who have passed their qualifying examinations from Delhi institutions by making their private arrangements for accommodation but at the same time do not have their family residence in Delhi subject to their furnishing a documentary evidence to the satisfaction of the University authorities.

List of Documents to be furnished :
1. Photocopy of Ration Card duly attested, (Bring original Ration Card for verification)

2. Residence Certificate/Domicile Certificate issued by BDO/SDM/ Tehsildar or any other competent authority. (where Ration Card System is not existing)

3. Posting Certificate (in case of service officers wards).

4. Document in support of private arrangement for accommodation in Delhi.

(d) Local students whose parents/guardians are transferred outside Delhi, subject to their furnishing satisfactory documentary evidence to this effect from the employer. Provided that in case an applicant fails to furnish the relevant documentary evidence, as mentioned at (b), (c) & (d) above, at the time of submitting an application for hostel as per the information furnished in the application and that certificates submitted subsequent to the start of hostel allotments in support of his/her claim will be considered by the Dean of Students as he deems fit.

Second Priority
Outstation students who are admitted to a programme at the level at which the student already has a degree or has pursued studies in JNU (at the same level) with hostel accommodation.

Third Priority
Fifth semester of two-year M.A. and M. Phil. 9th semester Ph. D. and local students in that order. Admission to the local students when provided will be only for the duration of the current academic session strictly and such students would be required to surrender the hostel accommodation latest by 31st May of the Academic Session.

Profile of University
Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), situated in New Delhi is one of the most prestigious universities across the country. JNU is basically a research oriented university, offering MPhil., PhD in several streams.

Instead of colleges, JNU offers undergraduate, postgraduate, MPhil. and research courses through various schools and centres of the university, that makes JNU different from other universities in the country.

The JNU came into existence in 1969 under the Jawaharlal Nehru University Act 1966. The university has identified and is concentrating upon some major academic programmes, which are of relevance to national progress and development.

JNU has a distinct picturesque view inside the campus that makes a scenic view. Several locations such as Parthsarthi Rock (PSR), caves are home of various birds and animals that makes the campus an urban sanctuary.

JNU is the only university in the country that provides free coaching facility to the aspirants willing to get admission in the university.

Students' Union (JNUSU) organizes free coaching classes for JNU aspirants planning to take their entrance exams this year.

The coaching classes are conducted to prepare students for what they are going to face in the entrance test. These classes are especially designed for students coming from deprived backgrounds.

It is a good experience for students belonging to different backgrounds to interact with the other students present in the class.

History Vice-Chancellors
Vice-Chancellors
* G. Parthasarathy, 1969-1974
* B. D. Nag Chaudhuri, 1974-1979
* K. R. Narayanan, 1979-1980
* Y. Nayudamma, 1981-1982
* P. N. Srivastava, 1983-1987
* M. S. Agwani, 1987-1992
* Yoginder K Alagh, 1992-1996
* A. Datta, 1996-2002
* G. K. Chadha, 2002-2005
* B. B. Bhattacharya, 2005-Present

JNU was established in 1969, by an act of parliament. It was named after Jawaharlal Nehru, India's First-Prime Minister of India), and was founded by his daughter, Prime Minister Mrs. Indira Gandhi. G. Parthasarathy was appointed as the First-Vice-Chancellor of the university.

The objective of the founders of this university was to make it a premier institution of higher learning for students of the erstwhile Third World countries. The university from the very beginning was meant to be a centre for Third World studies. A third objective of the university has been to promote research and teaching leading to the increasing engagement of its students and teachers in higher level academic work and national and international policy making.

Prof. B.B Bhattacharya
Vice Chancellor
(O) 91-11-26741500
Fax: 91-11-26742580

Dr. Andrew Lynn,
Asstt. Professor
(O): 01 26704082
(M) 9968474785.
andrew@mail.jnu.ac.in

Dr. Chinmay Basu
(O): 011-26704006
chinmay@mail.jnu.ac.in



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Media coverage of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Delhi, Delhi

JNU MMS scandal: Accused student arrested from Bihar

New Delhi: Over two months after the police complaint was filed in the sensational Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) MMS case, where an obscene clip was circulated in the institution, an accused has been arrested from Bihar, police said on Saturday.

A senior police official told reporters, We had sent a team to Bihar to arrest 23-year-old Janardhan Kumar, one of the accused in the case, who was also involved in making an obscene clip of a girl and circulating it in the university.

We were in touch with our counterparts there (Bihar) and on Saturday he was arrested, the official added.
During interrogation, Kumar said he came to Delhi in 2008 and got admission in BA in Korean language in JNU.Another senior police officer said: He was earlier known to the girl. In 2009, she also got admission in JNU and got the same hostel. They developed an intimate relationship, and also had physical relations which were videographed by Kumar. This was done in the room of a student named Rahul. The videography was converted into a video file with the help of a friend Balbir Chand and the same was taken on CD and circulated.

After an enquiry by JNU authorities, Kumar was expelled from the campus.Thereafter, he went to Nawada in Bihar and opened a coaching centre, said the officer.

According to police, security guards of the university informed the authorities on January 31 that a video recording showing two students in a compromising position in a hostel room was doing the rounds.
The university conducted an inquiry into the matter and handed over the report to police in the third week of February.

Following this, police lodged a complaint against Kumar and Balbir and recorded the statement of 12 witnesses.

Gul Panag to participate in July 31 Slut Walk in Delhi

New Delhi: To protest against eve teasing and sexual harassment, Slut Walk will be held in the Free Church area of Delhi. In addition to hundreds of female students and working girls, actor Gul Panag and actor, social activist Nafisa Ali and some models will also participate in the walk.

The Slut Walk will be called besharmi morcha. The coordinator of beharmi morcha said that the slut walk would be held after a performance by Delhi Drum Circle.

The Slut Walk will start at 11 am from Free Church and will cover Parliament, Patel Chowk and will come back to Free Church, where it will end.

At the end of the Slut Walk, Asmita, the theatre group of the students of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), will stage a play.Over 500 students, working women and NGO workers are expected to participate in the Slut Walk.

The walk will start at 11 am and end at 1 pm. The Slut Walk is being held to aware people that sexual harassment of women and eve teasing needs to stop.

JNU MMS fallout: Administration keeps vigil on love birds in campus

New Delhi: Following the shocking MMS scandal, which severely dented its image, the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) administration is keeping a close vigil on love birds inside the campus. The university had banned the entry of female students inside the hostel after the sex scandal.

However, it was forced to take back its decision following a stiff opposition from the students union. The universitys security department is keeping a close watch on the movement of students inside the campus and is keeping a close watch on the love couples.

Officials associated with security department said that though they do not have the right to force any of the students to follow the set hostel rules. It is for the hostel warden to see to it, they said.

The officials, however, also made it clear that the administration does not want any repetition of such kind of incidents.We are keeping a close watch on girl students who tend to stay put at boys hostel for a longer period of time, they added.According to the officials, a comprehensive log is being maintained in the Proctors office about those visiting the different hostels in the campus.

The move will help the institutes administration to nail students in the event of a similar eventuality in future, they said.

Gul Panag to participate in July 31 Slut Walk in Delhi

New Delhi: To protest against eve teasing and sexual harassment, Slut Walk will be held in the Free Church area of Delhi. In addition to hundreds of female students and working girls, actor Gul Panag and actor, social activist Nafisa Ali and some models will also participate in the walk.

The Slut Walk will be called besharmi morcha. The coordinator of beharmi morcha said that the slut walk would be held after a performance by Delhi Drum Circle.
The Slut Walk will start at 11 am from Free Church and will cover Parliament, Patel Chowk and will come back to Free Church, where it will end.

At the end of the Slut Walk, Asmita, the theatre group of the students of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), will stage a play.

Over 500 students, working women and NGO workers are expected to participate in the Slut Walk.

The walk will start at 11 am and end at 1 pm. The Slut Walk is being held to aware people that sexual harassment of women and eve teasing needs to stop.

International food festival at JNU on R-Day

New Delhi: Jawaharlal Nehru University here is a melting pot of cultures of over 50 countries and what a better way for students to know each other than to explore each others cuisine at the International Food Festival to be held in the campus on the Republic Day.

Foreign Students Association (FSA) in JNU, a platform of foreign students representing over fifty countries of the world, is organizing the Food Festival, an annual event in the Universitys calendar, when students from the respective countries showcase and serve their traditional dishes to the larger university community.

The festival also gives foreign students the opportunity to represent their native lands by offering hospitality and sharing music and picturesque locales.

President of Foreign Students Association of JNU Tawheed Reza Noor said, this is an event that gives room to bridge friendships with people from different parts of the world.


JNU MMS scandal: Accused student arrested from Bihar

New Delhi: Over two months after the police complaint was filed in the sensational Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) MMS case, where an obscene clip was circulated in the institution, an accused has been arrested from Bihar, police said on Saturday.

A senior police official told reporters, We had sent a team to Bihar to arrest 23-year-old Janardhan Kumar, one of the accused in the case, who was also involved in making an obscene clip of a girl and circulating it in the university.We were in touch with our counterparts there (Bihar) and on Saturday he was arrested, the official added.

During interrogation, Kumar said he came to Delhi in 2008 and got admission in BA in Korean language in JNU.Another senior police officer said: He was earlier known to the girl. In 2009, she also got admission in JNU and got the same hostel. They developed an intimate relationship, and also had physical relations which were videographed by Kumar. This was done in the room of a student named Rahul. The videography was converted into a video file with the help of a friend Balbir Chand and the same was taken on CD and circulated. After an enquiry by JNU authorities, Kumar was expelled from the campus.

Thereafter, he went to Nawada in Bihar and opened a coaching centre, said the officerAccording to police, security guards of the university informed the authorities on January 31 that a video recording showing two students in a compromising position in a hostel room was doing the rounds.The university conducted an inquiry into the matter and handed over the report to police in the third week of February.

Following this, police lodged a complaint against Kumar and Balbir and recorded the statement of 12 witnesses.

A night under the stars with Anna Hazare

New Delhi: Ravindra Roy, 24, is up all night helping frail protestors, fasting here with social reformer Anna Hazare, use lavatories or quench their thirst by getting them a glass of water. He says he owes this to his country.This is my duty as an Indian to help those who are fighting for my tomorrow, said the student from Jawaharlal Nehru University who has come to central Delhis Jantar Mantar with friends to support those demanding a strong anti-corruption Lokpal Bill with the involvement of civil society.

As the clock strikes 12 midnight on Friday, marking the fourth day of the fast, a sense of calm prevails. Unlike during the day, there is no shouting of slogans, singing of bhajans or dancing to drumbeats that mark what Hazare has termed the second satyagraha.Tables used as a platform by many protestors to stand or sit on and raise slogans of vande mataram and inquilab zindabad double up as beds with mattresses and bedsheets, providing some much needed rest to the agitators as well as some mediapersons spending the night there.
According to the activists, at night Hazare rests behind a wide white curtain on the left corner of the protest dais and three table fans are on to keep him cool.
Arrangements for freshening up are in place for Anna in that corner. He usually goes to bed by around 8 pm and gets up at around 7 am, said an activist who did not wish to be named.

Hundreds of other protestors from all over the country who are also undertaking the fast like their leader sleep on mattresses placed on green carpets under a white marquee.There were around 160 people on hunger strike on the first day, but now the number has increased to more than 300, said another activist.A couple of activists also stand guard to keep away stray dogs that attempt to go near the resting protestors in search of food.Some protestors also huddle around tables and softly debate corruption and the countrys future late into the night.They are fighters and are not sleeping but recharging their batteries for another battle tomorrow, said Salman Shafi, a businessman from Delhis Daryaganj area who had been at the site since afternoon.Playing a pivotal role in the movement are numerous posters, paintings and tricolours which hang all around the marquee even as gentle gusts of the midnight breeze make the flags flutter. They are a silent reminder of a revolution in the making.At around 3 am, the majority of protestors have fallen asleep.I am off to bed as I have to wake up early, as it is going to be a big day with the early morning meeting. I hope we get the bill passed, said Sohanpal Singh, a 46-year-old farmer from Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, sipping water from a water dispenser kept on a nearby table.Curling up next to a wall which has signed posters of people pledging their support to the movement, Singh said he may be uneducated but knows how corruption had ruined the country for years.

Two hours after Singh dozed off, others in the group start to wake up. Some do yoga while others offer their morning prayers after freshening up at a nearby public convenience run by the New Delhi Municipal Council.
Some of them have even brought along briefcase-sized shrines, which have everything from Ganga jal to incense sticks to vermillion, to offer their morning prayers.A lone kiosk selling tea and snacks opens up at around 5.30 a.m. and several activists and policemen who could not get a cuppa the whole night make a rush for it.By the time the clock strikes six, the site is once again buzzing with activity as protestors and mediapersons - other than those who have been there the whole night - start to arrive.Around 50 activists carry out a rally around Jantar Mantar, Janpath and Connaught Place with banners and tricolours and raised slogans like Netao ki manmani nahi chalegi (politicians cant do as they will) and Lokpal Bill pass karo (pass the Lokpal Bill).

This place gets packed by 8am and the number of people are increasing everyday – it has forced us to increase the quantity of food we serve here, said the owner of a south Indian restaurant.

SC allows JNU to hold students union poll

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Thursday allowed Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) to hold its students union elections, which had been stayed by the apex court in 2008 for non-compliance of some of its guidelines.

While allowing the polls, a bench headed by Justice AK Ganguly also relaxed some of the eligibility criteria recommended by the Lyngdoh committee for students to contest polls.The bench increased the age limit to contest the students union polls from 28 to 30 years and also waived the mandatory 75 per cent attendance pre-requisite for them to contest the polls.The JNU polls had been stayed by the apex court in 2008 for non-compliance of some of its guidelines.The apex court, however, said Lyngdoh committees recommendations for not using more than 5,000 pamphlets will continue for the JNU students union elections.The apex court had in October 2008 stayed the elections and had issued contempt notices to JNU Vice Chancellor and Registrar for their failure to comply with the Lyngdoh Committees recommendations which was accepted by the Supreme Court.The Supreme Court had appointed the panel, headed by former Chief Election Commissioner JM Lyngdoh, to suggest ways and means to reform students union election across the country and rid them of the influence of money and muscle power.

The panel in September 2006 had given its various guidelines and suggestions for smooth and orderly conduct of students union election across the country.

JNU MMS scandal: Probe launched after six months

New Delhi: The pornographic MMS of JNU students, shot in April last year had been doing the rounds of campus since last six months, but authorities did not take a note of it. It was just last Thursday that it came to the notice of security office in the campus.

JNU administration has launched a probe into the scandal. Sources say that a complaint was filed last year as well, but no action was taken against it, in absence of any complaints. With the university being defamed over a past few days, the administration had to finally take a call.Sources also informed that the MMS had been uploaded on the computer of University library as well.

The chief proctors office said the boy and the girl in the video were both students of the School of Languages. The film was shot with a mutual consent with a motive of earning money. The girl has since quit campus without completing her studies.

A computer science student is also under scanner for his alleged involvement in the making of the 1GB video which seems to have been professionally shot.A committee has been created under the leadership of Chief Proctor H B Mahindra in order to probe the incidence. The committee will submit the report to the university administration in the next 2-3 days.

The matter has not been officially reported to the police but the cops have launched their own probe. We are aware of the MMS allegations and have decided to ask the Vasant Kunj police to investigate. The ACP will seek a report from the JNU authorities and give it to us. Depending on the report, we will pursue the case further, said DCP (south) H G S Dhaliwal.
Police yet to register a complaint

According to DCP (South) H.G.S. Dhaliwal, police are awaiting confirmation from the university which has launched an internal probe in the matter.The girl and her friend were intimately involved. Another boy allegedly shot the video. JNU is yet to verify this, Dhaliwal told reporters here.

The JNU administration came to know about the video clip last week when the security department of the university submitted it to the proctors office.

JNU MMS scandal: FIR lodged against unknown person

New Delhi: Over two weeks after the prestigious Jawaharlal Nehru University was rocked by the emergence of a video clip showing two of its students in a compromising position, the Delhi Police on Thursday lodged a first information report (FIR) in the case.

An FIR has been lodged against unknown people and we have started investigations, Joint Commissioner of Police Amulya Patnaik said.The varsity expelled two male students and rusticated another for their involvement in the case February 13 after an internal inquiry.The universitys probe report and a complaint was forwarded to the Delhi Police, on which the FIR was registered today against unknown people, Deputy Commissioner of Police HGS Dhaliwal said.

The expulsion and rustication were part of the recommendations of the inquiry conducted by Chief Proctor HB Bohidar into the making and distribution of the clip which was shot last year in April in Tapti hostel.
One of the expelled boys figured in the tape, while the other has been held responsible for duplication of its contents, the report said.The third boy has been rusticated for providing the room to the girl and the boy. However, he was reportedly unaware of the filming of the video, added the report.The girl was unaware of being filmed, the report said.JNU authorities were also not satisfied by the response given by two boys to the show-cause notices served to them, while the boy who featured in the clip did not reply to the notice.

The featured couple were students of the School of Languages, while the boy who allegedly shot the video is a student of computer applications, the official said.

The girl left the university last year, the official said.The pornographic MMS of JNU students, shot in April last year had been doing rounds of campus since last six months, but authorities did not take a note of it.
Sources say that a complaint was filed last year as well, but no action was taken, in absence of any complaints.Sources also informed that the MMS had been uploaded on the computer of University library as well.

The chief proctors office said the boy and the girl in the video were both students of the School of Languages. The film was shot with mutual consent with a motive of earning money. The girl has since quit campus without completing her studies. A computer science student is also under scanner for his alleged involvement in the making of the 1GB video which seems to have been professionally shot.

Cuppa of cheer: Delhi warms up to World Cup fever

New Delhi: There are no carpet bombings or the distant drone of gunfire. But it is a war, nevertheless - a battle of another kind on a pitch spelling excitement, rivalry, goodwill, big money and sheer joy all at once.

The buzz is growing off the pitch on the eve of the 2011 Cricket World Cup semifinal clash between India and Pakistan at Mohali in Punjab on Wednesday.The day should be declared a national holiday, cricket enthusiast Sheeba Naaz, an M.Phil student at the Jamia Millia Islamia, said.Sheeba, who has followed the series passionately, intends to stay glued to her television on the match day.Hectic opinion polling is under way at the campuses here on the probable winner of the match.Net savvy students of Delhi University, Jawaharlal Nehru University, IGNOU and Jamia Millia Islamia are using social networking sites to post their verdicts and copy links to websites across the world.

Cricket has unified us - sort of jumped across bars of colours, race, religions and creed, said Anwesha Mohapatra, a final year humanities student at Gargi College.She has marked her opinion poll mandate to her cousins in the US, who are more used to watching baseball and soccer.The campaign, titled ICC Cricket World Cup 2011, has its odds stacked in favour of India.

Betting has been brisk on campuses. Several self-styled bookies are making a fast buck. The stakes vary between Rs 100 and Rs 1,000, a student in Delhi University said.However, Rohit Sahani, a young media trainee, has his ear to the ground in order to assess the impact of the hype generated by the media on both sides of the border.It will be a very exciting game but the hype is being built up by the media is unnecessary. Everyone will be relaxed as it will be an entertaining tie unlike the fireworks predicted by pundits, Sahni said.Cricket, if nothing else, promotes a diplomatic dialogue between India and Pakistan each time the two nations spar on the pitch.I am convinced that cricket will again provide the catalyst to bring about harmony, tolerance and good neighbourly relations, former Pakistan foreign secretary Shahryar Khan said in the book Shadows Across the Playing Field: 60 Years of India-Pakistan Cricket, co-written with writer-politician Shashi Tharoor, who used cricket as a barometric tool to measure the brownie points scored by the two nations post independence.Agreed leading art promoter and old Congress guard Narendra Bhikhu Ram Jain: India and Pakistan are the flag bearers of this series.The ongoing series is one of the most activity oriented commercial exercise, Jain said.The business around cricket in the capital has been booming.Entertainment company MoneyGram has released a Cricket for Peace anthem to cash in on the fever.The Second Sin eatery at the MGF Metropolitan Mall in Saket is wooing cricket enthusiasts with big screen telecast of the match, endless round of drinks and an array of vegetarian and non-vegetarian snacks.If India lifts the cup, the drinks will be complimentary - on the house, a spokesperson for the restro-pub said.Zazen, a snazzy restaurant in the HUDA restaurant complex in Panchkula, recommends a World Cup Chinaman Samplers Platter for Rs 599.The not-so-privileged in the capital too are not immune to the excitement.I am sure India will win. It has won several of the matches, Shiv Chowdhury, a domestic help in an upscale Delhi neighbourhood, said.

He was echoed by at least a dozen of fellow migrant domestic helps and cooks who watch the matches in a spirit of kinship at a shack after work.
The tele-viewing sessions are followed by a feast of rice, dal, curried vegetables and a dish of spicy mutton -- but only when India wins.

NU MMS scandal: Probe launched after six months

New Delhi: The pornographic MMS of JNU students, shot in April last year had been doing the rounds of campus since last six months, but authorities did not take a note of it. It was just last Thursday that it came to the notice of security office in the campus.

JNU administration has launched a probe into the scandal. Sources say that a complaint was filed last year as well, but no action was taken against it, in absence of any complaints. With the university being defamed over a past few days, the administration had to finally take a call.Sources also informed that the MMS had been uploaded on the computer of University library as well.
The chief proctors office said the boy and the girl in the video were both students of the School of Languages. The film was shot with a mutual consent with a motive of earning money. The girl has since quit campus without completing her studies. A computer science student is also under scanner for his alleged involvement in the making of the 1GB video which seems to have been professionally shot.A committee has been created under the leadership of Chief Proctor H B Mahindra in order to probe the incidence. The committee will submit the report to the university administration in the next 2-3 days.The matter has not been officially reported to the police but the cops have launched their own probe. We are aware of the MMS allegations and have decided to ask the Vasant Kunj police to investigate. The ACP will seek a report from the JNU authorities and give it to us. Depending on the report, we will pursue the case further, said DCP (south) H G S Dhaliwal.

Police yet to register a complaint
According to DCP (South) H.G.S. Dhaliwal, police are awaiting confirmation from the university which has launched an internal probe in the matter.
The girl and her friend were intimately involved. Another boy allegedly shot the video. JNU is yet to verify this, Dhaliwal told reporters here.

The JNU administration came to know about the video clip last week when the security department of the university submitted it to the proctors office.

Deepak Awasthi is NDA topper

Khadakwasla-Pune: Academy Cadet Captain (ACC) Deepak Awasthi stood first overall in the order of merit in the 121st course of the National Defence Academy (NDA), the convocation ceremony of which was held at the Habibullah hall of the academy on Monday morning. ACC Awasthi, a BSc in computer science graduate, secured 8.1 points and was followed closely by squadron cadet captain (SCC) Deependra Singh Kheechee, a bachelor of arts (BA) student who secured 8.08 points and battalion cadet adjutant (BCA) Amit Kumar Kandwal, a bachelor of science (BSc) graduate who secured 7.5 points. All three cadets topped their respective subject streams.

A total of 291 cadets including four from the Maldives and two from Afghanistan were awarded graduation degrees from the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) at the function which was graced by Jaspal Singh, vice chancellor of the Punjabi University, Patiala as chief guest. Ninety one cadets were awarded the BA degree, 95 the BSc in computer science and 105 cadets, the BSc degrees.

The three toppers were very focused about their future careers in the armed forces. ACC Deepak said that he was very keen to become a fighter pilot. I have wanted to fly planes ever since I was a small boy. I am confident of achieving my dreams, he told media persons who interviewed him after the convocation ceremony. Deepaks father, Rajesh Kumar Awasthi, a retired subedar in the Corps of Signals was all smiles as he looked at his sons medals. I never forced my son to join the armed forces. It is a decision he took while he was in the UP Sainik school in Lucknow, Rajesh Kumar said.
SCC Deependra Singh Kheechee, who admitted that he had competed with Deepak for the top academic spot said that it was his grandfather Narpat Singh, a veteran of the 1965 and 1971 wars with Pakistan who inspired him to join the armed forces. My grandfather was my biggest inspiration. He was a Rajputana Rifles soldier and I would like to emulate him by becoming an infantry officer, Deependra said.

According to Deependra, the NDA had made him a better person, instilled a positive attitude in him and given him a definite aim in life. Deependras father, Gaje Singh, a Rajasthan forest official, his mother Prem Kanwar and sister Kirti attended the convocation ceremony.

Likewise, battalion cadet adjutant (BCA) Amit Kumar Kandwal is keen to join the Indian Navys navigation cadre. Amit said that he was inspired by both his late grandfather, Suresh Kumar Kandwal, a Garhwal Rifles soldier and his father, Ansuya Prasad, a retired havaldar in the army. Amit, who opted out of an engineering college to join the NDA said, The academy has taught me to never give up and keep working very hard. I am going to remember this lesson all my life. It was touching to see Amit being watched by his octogenarian grandmother, Sateshwari Devi, his mother Anita Devi, father Ansuya Prasad, sister Deepti and grand uncle Surendra Prasad at the convocation ceremony.

Earlier, Jaspal Singh in his address advised the cadets to be creative, proactive and develop out-of-the-box thinking. Always think big in whatever you undertake. Drive looking at the windshield in front and not the rear view mirror, Singh told the young cadets.

The ceremony was attended by the NDA Commandant, Lt Gen Jatinder Singh, NDA Deputy Commandant, Air Vice Marshal Ajit Bhonsle, the academic and military training staff of the academy and parents of the cadets.

Cadet from Pune tops NDA merit list

Pune: Pune lad Cadet adjutant Nikhil Prabhune stood first in the order of merit in academics in the 120th passing-out batch of the National Defence Academy (NDA).The son of a retired Indian Air Force sergeant from Lohegaon, Nikhil was awarded the Chief of Naval Staff trophy by the general officer commanding-in-chief of Southern Command, Lieutenant General AK Singh, at the convocation ceremony held at NDAs Habibullah Hall on Monday morning.

Nikhil also won the Admirals trophy for standing first in the computer science stream.
Divisional cadet captain Kishor Kunal bagged the Chief of Army Staff trophy for standing first in the science stream and cadet Amrit Raj won the Chief of Air Staff trophy for standing first in the arts stream.

A total of 335 cadets from the 120th batch of the NDA were awarded graduation degrees from the Jawaharlal Nehru University on Monday. Of these, 107 cadets were awarded degrees in arts, 123 in computer science and 105 in science. The graduates include three from the Maldives and one from Bhutan.

Nikhil had stood 17th in the all-India merit list for the NDA entrance examination three years ago. He will join the Indian Naval Academy at Ezhimala next month and aims at becoming a naval aviator. Speaking to media persons after the convocation ceremony, Nikhil said consistent hard work helped him bag the top academic prize at the NDA. He said he considered the NDA to be special because it provides all-round development.

I learnt the Russian language and also became a good sailor at the academy, Nikhil said.

On the other hand Kunal, who hails from Champaran in Bihar, is the son of a school teacher. Kunal, who heads for the Indian Military Academy (IMA) in July is keen to become an infantry officer in the Gorkha Rifles. He was all praise for the training modules at the NDA. When I joined the academy, I did not know how to swim. But by the end of my term, I managed to swim a 3-km stretch in the Khadakwasla lake.

Similar were the views of Amrit Raj, a resident of Patna in Bihar and the son of an accountant. Amrit said he could not swim nor run when he joined the academy, but has become proficient in both fields. Today I am able to run 16 km with ease. We are just raw material. The academy moulds us, Amrit said. He also wants to become an infantry officer.In his convocation address, Singh displayed sensitivity when he addressed the audience in both Hindi and English, considering that many parents and guardians are not familiar with English. Singh urged the cadets to become dynamic leaders, who could inspire jawans, sailors and the air warriors in battle.

Trust and leadership are two important attributes that you need to imbibe. Service should always be before self, Singh said.

Assam Valley Literary Award presented

GUWAHATI, March 26 – Noted Hindi poet Dr Kedar Nath Singh today laid stress on translation of Indian regional language literature into other Indian languages so as to strengthen the multi-coloured diversity of Indian languages, literature and culture for the sake of uniting the nation.

He was presenting the 21st Assam Valley Literary Award to noted litterateur Harekrishna Deka at the Mackhowa ITA Centre for Performing Arts here.

Dr Singh, a former head of the Department of Hindi of the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, said that the power of the people lies in their own languages. He also maintained that there is a great need to bring in a change in the attitude of the elite section of the people towards the regional languages and literature of the country. They must deviate from their present stand of laying stress on translating English literary works into their own languages.

He also underlined the need of compiling the history of Indian poetry. But, he cautioned until the translation of regional language poems into the other languages of the country is completed, this goal cannot be achieved. He also read out two poems of Harekrishna Deka that he had translated into Hindi.

In his acceptance speech, Deka said that language cannot be dissociated from the social reality. Language is a socially-conditioned act. Laying stress on writing in ones own tongue, he said that the objective of wring in ones own tongue is to serve the cause of the people, whose heritage forms the source of a writers creativity. The highest standards in writing can be achieved through sheer professionalism but if regional writers were to peruse mere individual agendas, the community and the language would suffer.

Assuming that such a situation is at hand some day, I hope our writers wont forget the fact that one of their basic goals is to preserve the unique character of the tongue in which they write, which it is their duty to enrich and enhance, he said. He suggested that the Magor Education Trust should release an annual fund for a project to translate selected Assamese texts into English.

The award consists of a scroll of honour, a trophy and a cash amount of Rs four lakh.

The function was also addressed by RS Jhawar and Dulal Sarma of the Williamson Magor Education Trust.

No place for Dalits in JNU body...

Skin-deep Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), Delhis student Leftist bastion, has just elected an American. But it has had only one Dalit president ever since students union elections began here in 1971-72. For the record, JNU is above caste-based politics but in reality, politics in the university has always been controlled by upper castes. The only Dalit JNU students union president was Batti Lal Bairwa in 1996. Only one Dalit candidate, Mati Anand, could win the post of general secretary, in 2001 on the banner of the CPI-backed All India Students Federation (AISF).

As for the extreme left All India Students Association (AISA), the student wing of the CPI(ML)-Liberation, it fielded only two backward candidates during the last five years. Ironically, in the just-concluded elections, though the Left parties said they were pro-reservation, they refrained from fielding any candidate from the backward community. The fielding of candidates from the OBCs by the Left bodies could have been of significance, since they were fighting the anti-reservation unit Youth for Equality.

If this is the state of affairs in Indias hub of varsity intellectuals, then one can imagine the plight of other educational institutions. A majority of the universities of northern India have no representation of SC-ST students. Says Dr. Anand Pradhan, Associate Professor of the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, who once was the President of Benaras Hindu University, I cant recall any SC-ST candidate winning elections in BHU. Only some OBCs could make it to less important posts. For Dalits, even this was not possible. Recalls former general secretary of Lucknow University, Ram Chandra Pradhan, I was the first backward to win elections in this university. After me only Rajpal Kashayp could make it to presidential post. No other backward could reach the central panel.

Since 1977, when the students elections started in Punjab University, Chandigarh, there have been 17 presidents, but none from the SC-STs. In Delhi University during the last 10 years the only backward to make it to the central panel was Tarun Kumar of the NSUI. NSUI National President Nadeem Javed admitted that political parties do hesitate to field backward candidates. Pradhan pointed out, It is difficult for a backward to survive in the student politics for several socio-economic reasons. SFI member Harish Vankhere (a Dalit) argues in favour of the Left units. How many Dalit students take part actively in politics? If they come forward and work, they do get a chance.

But the backwards in progressive JNU are perhaps feeling the isolation. This time, Dalit students fought under the banner of the Bahujan Student Forum and managed to bag over 100 votes without the support of any mainstream political outfit. Had Dalit students been given representation by the big parties, what was the need to fight separately, asks Bharat Kumar, a research scholar in JNU. He is right. In JNU, there are no dearth of backward students eager to play their parts in active politics. But then from right to left the parties perhaps are not progressive enough to embrace them. Though they find Americans more acceptable and charming.

India to reduce dependence on Iranian oil

India will increase imports of crude oil from Africa and Latin American countries to reduce dependence on Gulf countries, especially Iran which is facing sanctions from the US and the European countries, a senior government official said on Wednesday.

We have started diversifying crude oil purchases. Earlier, all our crude oil imports were from Gulf, now only 60 percent comes from Gulf countries, said A.R. Ghanshyam, joint secretary (Gulf) in the external affairs ministry.

He said crude oil imports from Africa and Latin American countries especially from Venezuela have increased sharply in the recent years.

Saudi Arabia is the biggest supplier of crude oil to India followed by Iran.

Although imports from Saudi Arabia has remained steady at around 27 million metric tonne per year, oil purchases from Iran have gone down in the last couple of years. Imports from Iran fell to 18.5 million metric tonnes in 2010-11 as compared to 21.19 million metric tonnes in the previous year. They are likely to drop further in the current financial year.

Asked whether India would cut oil imports from Iran in view of the sanctions, Ghanshyam said: Our policy is to diversify the sources. We dont consider the relationship with one country at the expense of other country.

Addressing an energy conference organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) here, Ghanshyam, however, admitted that despite the diversification Gulf countries would remain the most important source of energy for India in the coming years.

Gulf region is very important for us. Our 60 percent of oil import is from the Gulf region. Out of the $620 billion foreign trade registered in 2010-11, $135 billion was with the Gulf region, he said adding that over six million Indian diaspora contribute over 50 percent of Indias foreign remittances.

Most importantly the Gulf region has trillions of dollars of investible surplus and is looking at India as a promising investment destination, he said.

In his address, Girijesh Pant, of the Centre for West Asian Studies in Jawaharlal Nehru University here, said: Gulf countries have higher expectations as far as co-operation with India is concerned and energy as well as oil and gas is only one dimension of this cooperation.

However, India needs to factor in the political tension within Iraq and other issues like the impact of Arab Spring on India when developing its policy for the region, he added.

Atul Chandra, an advisor at Reliance Industries Limited, said India needed to further diversify sources to ensure long-term energy security.

While some effort has been made to ensure energy security, more needs to be done, said Chandra, who is also the former chairman and managing director of the state-run Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC).

Natural resources are curse for Chhattisgarh

The rich natural resource of Chhattisgarh has become curse for its people as corporate sectors and the government have being trying hard to acquire those resources by forcing tribals to move out from the area. Had Dr Binayak Sens campaign not been launched, tribal would have been uprooted by now. Senior Supreme Court advocate, Prashant Bhushan observed while releasing the Tamil version of the most-talked about book, A Doctor to Defend - The Binayak Sen Story, at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi on January 20 at about 6 PM.

He reminded the gathering that though things have improved in Chhattisgarh since the Dr Sens campaign three years ago, a lot needs to be done yet. Even today it is the state where there is no authority and law. Dr Sen is a heroic man, he said.

Also, he pointed out that despite all claims about independent media in India, the local media is not free to report the excesses of police. The Judiciary too doesnt virtually exist in the state like a black hole. In such circumstance, the only hope is participation from more and more people, he added.

Presiding over the function Professor K Nachimuthu, Chairperson, Centre of Indian Languages-JNU, praised the work done by Dr Sen in Chhattisgarh which have attracted international attention. He praised him for exposing the atrocities of Salwa Judum and Green Hunt operation in which hundreds of tribal got uprooted and lost their lives in the battle against. The professor highlighted Dr Sen and his wife Dr. Illina Sens link with JNU.

The book translated by a former JNU research scholar, K.Thirunavukkarasu and published by Kalachuvadu publications, was termed a job well done by the English author of the book Minnie Vaid. Talking about her journey while writing the book, she said, Doing research on the book was easy as Dr Sen was popular and I didnt have any difficulties in getting feedback from the locals.

It is not a biography of Dr Sen as it deals with other important issues in Chhattisgarh, she claimed. Dr Sen too was caught up in the low-intensity conflict in Chhattisgarh and the district court had convicted him of life sentence on alleged sedition and conspiracy charges. He was released after international community and social activists intervened into the matter. Since then he has been in the headlines for highlighting the plights of the tribal.

Professor Nandini Sundar of Delhi School of Economics, who has played an important role in exposing the excesses of Salwa Judum and fighting a case against it, also talked about the police over-indulgence and illegal detention of tribal youth in the state. She said things have improved a bit as most newspapers have their reporters within the state. The mass killing has stopped that used to happen between 2005 and 2009. And now people who have fled the state out of fear have now started returning back. But a huge amount of works need to be done in the state, she asserted.

Talking about Dr Sen, she said his great contributions have been that many people joined him in the campaign to fight for their rights.

About the Book:

A Doctor to Defend: The Binayak Sen Story
English author: Minnie Vaid
Translator: K. Thirunavukkarasu
Publisher: Kalachuvadu
Pages: 287
Price: Rs 225 Paper pack

Poverty is a serious concern in Bihar

Bihar has been changing and developing fast but its poverty is not declining, warned Planning Commission member Abhijit Sen here.

It is a matter of serious concern that there is no decline in poverty in Bihar despite a high growth rate and development, says Abhijit Sen, who is here to attend a three-day global meet on changing Bihar

Sen, a well-known economist, said that while Bihar had been maintaining good growth rates between 2004 and 2009, it had failed to reduce the rate of poverty. Bihar has impressed many with its high growth rate. That is good. But at the same time, the state has not seen a decline in the rate of poverty. It is still at the bottom of the pile and has a lot of catching up to do, he said.

Sen said that this was clearly reflected in the National Sample Survey Organisation report.

He agreed that outside the state, people do have a sense that something good is happening in Bihar and development is taking place. Bihar will have to maintain its growth rate for the next five years with good governance, Sen said.

Sen said that the state government should work hard to ensure law and order, maintain fiscal responsibility, good governance and energy.

Energy deficit is the major hurdle or roadblock for Bihar in moving forward. The government should focus on energy, Sen said.

Sen, who has a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Cambridge, also teaches at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi.

Earlier, Aditya Birla Group chairman Kumarmanglam Birla said at the meet that investments for heavy industries in Bihar would be impossible until the power situation in the state improves substantially. He urged the state government to first take steps to improve its power situation and then expect investments.

Chinese checkers

Last year, Chinas ambassador in Delhi, Zhang Yan, had asked an Indian reporter to shut up after he got into a verbal spat with the scribe over a distorted territorial map of India.

More recently, a diabetic Indian diplomat collapsed in a court in a Chinese town near Shanghai when he was denied food and medicine for six hours. The Indian official was in the court for negotiations to free two Indian traders.

And now, China has denied a visa to an Air Force officer from Arunachal Pradesh, a part of India that Beijing regards as a disputed area.

The confrontational posturing by China in matters relating to India has worsened the already troubled relations between the two countries. Observers in India wonder what could be prompting Chinas new-found assertiveness.

No easy answers are possible. The relationship between India and China is extremely complex and multilayered. It sways between fierce competition and an undeniable need for mutual cooperation.

Ambassador Zhang Yan has since called for an end to the adversarial relationship between India and China and stressed the need for greater all-round cooperation.

China has indeed been blowing hot and cold in recent times even as matters have definitely changed for the better.

Indias discomfiture with China stems in no mean measure from projections of the western media. We lose sight of the fact that a vocabulary that includes words like encirclement, counterbalance, alliance and competition has not been a part our traditional thinking.

Alka Acharya, Associate Professor in Chinese Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, believes, The complexities of India-China relations are not understood properly and the western media has its own way of reporting it. In India, it is picked up without corroboration whereas the positive side hardly ever gets reported.

Admiral Arun Prakash views the Indian reaction to the developments around it as lackadaisical. He says, Countries in our neighbourhood keep asking for our help� but our reactions are so slow that the Chinese get there first. Sri Lanka offered Hambantota port to India first but ultimately the Chinese agreed to build it. Myanmar had offered Stilwell Road to India to build but then we kept waiting until the Chinese came and started building.

He feels that instead of blaming China for our shortcomings we should first see what we have done. Our policies need to be far more proactive, he adds. There was a time when a bitterly disputed border was the entire sum and substance of all official talks between India and China. However, in recent years, there has been a noticeably broadening and deepening multi-level engagement between the two countries.

But the overarching paradox still remains: there has been remarkable increase in trade on the one hand and continued low levels of mutual trust and confidence on the other.

What China has not been able to appreciate is the consistency of the Indian stand on Tibet and Taiwan. Anti-China political activities are strictly forbidden on Indian soil. Also, there are no country-specific restrictions on Chinese investment in India and vice versa.

Particularly noteworthy are the bilateral mechanisms of Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED) and the Annual Defence Dialogue (ADD). Both India and China showed maturity when they allowed the ADD to go ahead even after an initial hitch due to a speech delivered by the Dalai Lama at the International Buddhist Conference held in Delhi.

The same maturity has allowed a visit of a pared-down Indian defence delegation to go ahead despite an Air force officer, Group Captain M. Panging, being denied a visa.

Significantly, India is the only country other than the US with which China has an SED mechanism.

However, matters are aggravated by Chinese bellicose actions, real as well as perceived, in Tibet and in Indias neighbourhood (especially in Pakistan).
India is concerned about Chinas move to develop naval bases in the Indian Ocean region, which India perceives as its sphere of influence. But could this not be just a means to secure the sea lanes of communications for Chinese trade?�

Experts emphasise that the China-India border issue is mired in the politics of competing perceptions, myth-making and obfuscations.

Under these circumstances, Indias best strategy would be to endeavour to resolve the tension points in its neighbourhood and improve its relations with its neighbours, especially China.

A senior Defence officer says, Whatever infrastructure China is developing, it is doing on its own territory. Has anyone stopped us from doing the same on our side of the border?

He, however, adds that we surely need to be conscious about the developments.

The officer alludes to the six airfields and an all-weather road network that have been developed in Tibet. A series of incidents in Tibet and Xinjiang have necessitated force deployment. The development of infrastructure can be seen as preparations by the Chinese government to deal with any future eventuality, he explains.

However, one cannot deny that the same infrastructure could be put to other uses. The officer asks: Why has such a huge infrastructure been developed for such small population in Tibet and Xinjiang?

While China has constantly questioned the legality of the McMahon Line, they have regularly shifted their claims on territories. While India has been consistent on Tibet, Delhi can view the denial of a visa to Group Captain M. Panging as wrong and questions can be raised. Has India ever tried telling Beijing: dont send PLA officers posted in the Tibet Autonomous Region on the military delegations touring India since our guests, Tibetan refugees, find it offensive?

The nuclear explosions of May 1998 shaped and moulded the strategic dimensions of the relationship. Indias nuclear deal with the US, too, has raised concerns among the policy makers in China.

China sees the US as its primary strategic challenge and that it seeks to keep China contained within the region by its military presence around China and by its alliances with Chinas neighbours is of concern to Beijing.

The phenomenon of the rise of China, has to be dealt with pro-actively in an era of economic globalisation and integration. Bilateral trade is being recognised as the most reliable instrument of China-India rapprochement. By 2015, it is expected to be worth more than $100 billion.

But the long-term potential as trade partners is yet to be fully explored and exploited and it will only happen after the political equations break out of the problematic legacies.

Of late, India and China have demonstrated that they are capable of dealing maturely even as there exist differences on several issues. We have to keep in perspective the China-Pakistan equation and the India-US partnership while suspicion over movement and activity in the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean remain.

The once mammoth industry in the state is dying

End of the Bengal tea party The relationship between Bengal governor Gopal Krishna Gandhi and the states Left Front government is edgy, at best. In the last two years, the governor has managed to ruffle a lot of Left feathers with his positions on land acquisition in Nandigram and Singur. Now a fresh chapter of attrition could be opened.

While visiting the Ramjhora tea estate on March 2, 2007, Gandhi went straight to the labour lines and noted 36 deaths in the past 15 months. To make the atmosphere amiable, the district administration offered him lunch at the circuit house which the governor refused.

Instead, he asked the administration to provide minimum relief to plantation workers. It is shocking to find people dying of starvation in a progressive country like India. I read about it from newspapers and saw it after my visit to this garden. It has left me disheartened. True to his legacy, Gandhi offered a days fast in solidarity with the dying and the depressed. The Ramjhora tea estate, which once employed more than 7,000, has reported more than 100 starvation deaths. A recent study by some scholars from the Jawaharlal Nehru University `Miseries of tea garden workers of Darjeeling tea region, has delved deeply in the privations and misery of more than three million people of Darjeeling, Jalpaiguri and Cooch Behar who are directly and indirectly affected by a slackening tea industry. Leader of the JNU team, Amita Singh, has claimed that over 1,400 people have perished due to closure-inflicted starvation and other related diseases in this region since 2000. With land becoming scarce since 2001, tea gardens in Darjeeling and Jalpaiguri districts have plunged into deep economic crisis.

Says Dean of the School of Management and Labour Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, Sharit K. Bhowmik: Terai and Dooars regions produce 17 per cent of Indian Tea and employ around 250,000 labourers. This area is the worst affected.

According to Bhowmik, by 2006-07, 16 tea gardens in the Dooars region, employing over 10,000 workers were closed, affecting nearly 50,000 people. The tea estates have since then been converted into housing and commercial complexes.

Now even key Left constituents are worried. Says Ashok Ghosh, general secretary of RSP-backed trade union, the largest in Terai and Dooars: Official data admits 571 starvation deaths in 15 months, between 1-1-2006 and 31-3-2007. Of these, 402 were less than 60 years of age, 317 are male and 254 are female, 62 are children less than 10 years of age. 465 people out of 571 have died in their dilapidated homes, which mean no medical attention in hospitals was available in the case of 80 percent of these deaths. A sordid picture in a state ruled by `pro-people politicians.

In June 2007, Sabyasachi Sen, then commerce secretary of the West Bengal, admitted poverty is the cause for a high number of deaths in tea gardens and highest number of deaths was reported from Kalchini Gardens.

The Tea Board, the apex government body which oversees industry, said 12 gardens in West Bengal and five in Kerala are under closure. A Tea Board official said that ``problems cant be solved until the gardens are reopened. That could be a tall order.

China honours Indian with highest literary award

China has conferred its highest literary award on B.R. Deepak for his book, which is a translation of 88 classical Chinese poems into Hindi.

Prof. Deepak, who is from Centre of Chinese and Southeast Asian Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, was the first Indian to receive the Special Book Award for his contribution to Chinese studies, translation, publication of Chinese books and cultural exchange.

The award was presented by the State Counsellor, Liu Yandong, at an investiture held in National Theatre of Performing Arts and the awards were given away by the State Counselor Liu Yandong.

The book is first-of-its-kind translation of 88 classical poems from 11th to 14th Century BC into Hindi that have been selected from various periods of Chinese history starting from Shijing of pre Qin to Xixiangji of the Yuan dynasty, Prof Deepak, currently visiting professor of Chinese and Dean of the School of Languages, Doon University, Dehradun, Uttrakhand told PTI on Friday.

The book provides a kaleidoscopic view of the poetic tradition and genres such as Chu Ci, Han Yuefu, Tang Shi and Song Ci to the readers, along with the original Chinese text that has also been provided.

The collection also incorporates the poetry of great patriot poet Qu Yuan, folk songs from northern and southern dynasties, and some lyrics from Yuan dramas.

It is perhaps for the first time that Indian readers, especially the vast majority of the Hindi speaking population, have been exposed to the glorious poetic tradition and culture of ancient China.

Prof. Deepak has also authored India and China 1904-2004: A Century of Peace and Conflict (2005), India—China Relations in first half of the Twentieth Century (2001), History of Chinese Literature with selected Texts (2001), Chinese—Hindi Dictionary (2003), China: Agriculture, Countryside and Peasants (2011), and My Life With Kotnis (2006), a translation of Wo yu Ke Dihua narrated by Kotnis wife Guo Qinglan and compiled by Xu Baohong.

Watering the desert

Watering the desert There must be some weird pleasure in sleeping with the enemy that makes Israel do it again and again. If earlier it was Yasser Arafat, propped up to counter the Hamas, now it is President Mahmoud Abbas who Israel is strengthening to tackle the more extremist faction in Palestine. Th e new development is that Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has coaxed the Bush administration to shell out $100m from the frozen Palestinian Authority funds to give Abbas. Olmert also convinced Egypt to provide the Fatah faction with a large consignment of arms including 200 AK-47 rifl es, 20,000 magazines and two million bullets worth around $12m. In addition, millions of dollars have been released to help Abbas defeat the Hamas.

Th e strategy is simple: engage the Palestinians in an internal battle and let them kill each other rather than bombing innocent Israelis. A sound strategy, especially when the world is condemning Israel for gross violation of human rights. It makes sense for Olmert to shift the focus of Hamas away from Israeli territory to people within their own community. Israel would achieve its goal of not only creating a wider wedge in the enemy camp, but would also be able to annihilate the socalled extremists without using its own soldiers, Dr Girijesh Pant, Chairperson, Centre for West Asian and African Studies in Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Th is appears cool. Except that weapons have a nasty way of popping up. What Israel is supplying today to hurt Palestinians could well be used to target Israelis later. Its odd: the more Israel fi ghts, the less it seems to win. Long drawn battles cannot be solved by creating a Frankensteins monster.

Th e problem is that Palestinians are too willing to kill each other. Th ey forget that progress is in construction, not in destruction. Th e way to do it is talk. Talk till something gives. Th e Hamas and Fatah should see the good in each other and join hands for peace. Lest they should have no people or no land to fi ght for.

Fight for a just cause

Fight for a just cause Its been close to 24 hours since Tyler William sat on hunger-strike at the administrative building of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU). Tyler, an American-born, is a student of Hindi Literature. Nevertheless, when needed, he doubles up as the Vice-President of Student Union. Many of his comrades, who are either facing suspension or are expelled, are on hunger-strike since 25th of June. They are under constant medical-surveillance. Strikes like these, ostensibly to put pressure on the authority, are common in this so called laboratory of communism. This time around, the struggle has been waged about the minimum wages of construction labourers working in the campus. The union claims that these workers are ill-paid and they were merely demanding right wage. But the issue is not as simple as it looks. There must be a reason why the administration went for punitive measures. Actually, it all started on 19th February when some of these students gheraoed registrar Awais Ahmed forcing him to sit inside his car for more than six hours. Enraged by the incident, the varsity administration slapped suspension orders on eight students and fined another three. One of them named Venesa Chisti has been declared persona non grata in the campus.

Vice-Chancellor B.B. Bhattacharya told that the students have become so indisciplined that they create hindrance to each and every developmental work in the campus. Positive talks are the only way out and not such reactionary actions. We had to take some action.

However, his claims are refuted by Dhananjaya, who heads the JNUSU. He said: In the past, we had approached the administration for talks but they kept on turning down our request on the pretext that the issue had nothing to do with students. He is supported by another student leader Rajiv Ranjan. We are only trying to put in practice all those theories of struggle that we mug-up from the text-books, Ranjan said. Fight for a just cause On the other hand, the administration maintains that they are not accountable for the workers as they are employed on a contract basis by CPWD. They also claim that the issues have already been addressed by the concerned authorities.

There is yet another angle to this incident as well. The administration had earlier revoked the suspension orders when students had apologised for their actions. Students claim that it was a calculated move as the administration did not want any disruption during the up-coming examinations. But ironocially, as soon as the summer vacation started the suspension orders were reinvoked once again. Tyler adds: The intensions of the V-C were malafide. He waited for the vacations to take his revenge. The struggle will only intensify once classes commence. Meanwhile, the administration maintains that all this drama is politically motivated. The V-C adds: When these reactionary groups did not have anything to protest they raised the issue of labourers. Many of these students have confided in me that I have dispensed my duties well and there are political compulsions behind their protests.

Both the administration as well as the student body justify their cause. However, the question arises: why did the administration take punitive actions in spite of written apology from the students? While the union is fighting for its survival, the administration has decided to teach them a lesson. In this tussle the name of a reputed institute is getting sullied.

World economy is slowing down, says UNCTAD

Soon after a rapid post-crisis recovery, the world economy is slowing down from about 4 per cent GDP growth in 2010 to around 3 per cent in 2011.

According to United Nations Conference on Trade and Development - UNCTADs - latest report, growth performance is strong in developing economies, which have resumed their pre-crisis growth trend and are expanding at above 6 per cent this year. In contrast, developed economies will only grow between 1.5 and 2 per cent in 2011. Transition economies continue to recover from the steep fall in 2009 with growth rates at around 4 per cent.

The focus of UNCTADs Trade and Development Report 2011 is Post-crisis policy challenges in the world economy. The Report will be released in Delhi by economist Jayati Ghosh, (Professor of Economics, Jawaharlal Nehru University) on September 6, 2011.

The Report argues that a shift from fiscal stimulus towards fiscal tightening is self-defeating, especially in the most developed economies which were severely hit by the financial crisis. In such a situation, a restrictive fiscal policy may reduce GDP growth and fiscal revenues, and is therefore counterproductive in terms of fiscal consolidation.

No need for more studies on black money, says JNU Prof Kumar

Delays in action against black money by way of committees and studies will give time to corrupt politicians, businessmen and bureaucrats to divert their ill-gotten funds into shell companies, an eminent JNU professor has said.

More studies or committees or new special investigating wing and treaties with foreign governments are only to stall action, said Arun Kumar, the head of the Centre for Economic Studies and Planning in Jawaharlal Nehru University.

Kumar, who has authored The Black Economy in India, said the governments move to institute studies and form committees on black money will only give time to triad -- politicians, businessmen and bureaucrats -- to invest their funds in shell companies abroad.

He gave the example of a politician from Jharkhand who is alleged to have invested unaccounted funds in African mines.

All India Students Association sweeps JNU polls

Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) was painted red again with the ultra-Left All India Students Association on Saturday sweeping the students union polls winning all the top four posts and majority of councillors seats.

AISAs Sucheta De, a PhD Geography student, trumped SFI-AISF combines Ziko Dasgupta by a margin of 1,251 votes for the post of president. De won a whopping 2,102 votes while Gupta managed to garner only 751 votes.

Abhishek Yadav was elected as the Vice President defeating his nearest rival by a margin of 620 while Ravi Prasad won the General Secretary post by a margin of 919 votes.

Mohd Firoz is the new Joint Secretary. He defeated his nearest rival by 579 votes.

As many as 123 candidates were in fray for the 30 seats, including the four top posts for the polls conducted after a gap of four years.

Majority of the councillors seat was also won by the AISA.

The varsity has traditionally been a bastion of Leftist groups. Notably, the last student union, that was elected in 2007, was also dominated by AISA.

The candidates this time had focused on struggle to restore the democratic process, the Lyngdoh committee recommendations and the need to reject them and a whole host of pent up issues of students.

No direction from SC in OBC quota admission

The Supreme Court on Friday declined to give any immediate direction on discrepancies in implementation of the reservation policy relating to OBC quota in central universities and posted the matter for hearing on July 4.

A vacation bench of justices P Sathasivam and A K Patnaik directed that the matter be listed on Monday before the regular bench where the matter was already pending.

A bench headed by Justice R V Raveendran had been seized of the petition which pointed out the confusion prevailing in several universities, including Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) and Delhi University (DU) where admission process was in full swing.

The regular bench will decide whether the cut-off marks for the OBC candidates should be 10 per cent less than the marks fixed for the general category candidates or should it be 10 per cent relaxation in the minimum eligibility criteria.

The petitioner P V Indersan, a former professor of IIT Madras, had sought implementation of an earlier apex court verdict by which the constitutional validity of 27 per cent quota for OBCs in the Central Universities was upheld by it on April 10, 2008.

The vacation bench was informed that the three judges in a majority verdict had held that the cut-off marks for OBCs should not be less than five per cent or 10 per cent as against the general category candidates.

Frame of freedom, canvas of intolerance

If democracy is a shared value among many of the worlds states today, they still differ substantially in the tolerance of civil freedoms often granted to the citizens by their respective Constitutions. Let me pick up three out of numerous instances.

In the late 1970s, M.F. Husain paints the Hindu goddess Saraswati in the nude. Nothing unusual. Twenty years on, some members of the Sangh Parivar get to hear of it, though they have never seen the painting. Some 20-odd lumpen boys vandalise the painters house, destroy several of his paintings and threaten to disrupt any exhibition depicting any of his paintings even in a group show. The mighty Indian state crumbles and cannot assure security for such exhibitions. Encouraged, the Sangh Parivar raises the stridency of threats to the legendary artist, extending to his very life.

In 2006, the Union home minister, Mr Shivraj Patil, sends out an advisory to the police commissioners of Delhi and Mumbai cautioning against possible communal tension created by the presence of Husain. Husain, at the end of his tether, goes into exile, never to come back to his beloved country and for ever sad for it. Though, like a true gentleman, he shared the sadness only with a few close friends.

In 2009, some six Muslim men float an outfit and under its banner hold a protest against controversial Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen in Kolkata. The countrys most secular (Left Front) government throws the writer out of the country even as she fervently pleads to be allowed to stay on in what she had begun to consider her home. She has not come back either, even as she hopes to, with the change of government.

Some three decades ago, Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran had sentenced Salman Rushdie to death for writing Satanic Verses. Rushdie found shelter in England where the state spent millions to give him protection even as he remained a vocal critic of the various governments there.

Both India and the UK are democracies — yet they couldnt be further apart in their respect for civil liberties. Ironically, while Indias Constitution announces it as a secular state, the UK is formally an Anglican Christian state.

The crux of the difference is that India, especially its polity, equates its secularism with multi-communalisms in which the equilibrium keeps altering with the stridency of the assertion of self-assumed representation of one or the other community, even if all it takes is to mobilise some half a dozen to two dozen individuals on any occasion to lay such claim, with the media glare inflating their presence manifold.

Our secularism is indeed very fragile and our civil rights most vulnerable. Husains instance is particularly tragic for several reasons. His calibre as an artist would have made him a prized citizen for any country. He redefined all the basic features of his craft: the grandeur of vision of his themes, the drawing of lines, the colours and the very deep roots in Indian, especially Hindu, culture and mythology. In some ways, he was the ideal candidate for what the Sangh Parivar envisages as a perfect Indian Muslim — committed to his own religious rituals like the namaz, almost all his paintings draw inspiration from Hindu mythology. He drew numerous pictures of Ganesha, Gandhari, birth of Lord Buddha, Saraswati and of course, the quintessential Indian womanhood.

The Sangh Parivars charges about nude pictures of goddesses etc. — which drove Husain into exile — demonstrates how little it knows or cares about Hindu mythology and art. Implicit in the charge is the assumption that nudity is sinful and reprehensible because of its association with sexuality. The association of nudity (and sex) with sin and of sin with Eve is Christian in origin, which led to the fall of Adam from the Garden of Eden; there is not even a hint of such association in Hinduism.

Indeed, there is a constant celebration of nudity and sexuality as an act of piety in mythological stories, temples, literature and painting. In an 18th-century Kangra painting of Radha and Krishna, a completely nude Radha is depicted on top of a totally nude Krishna, in copulation. Clearly, the meaning of nudity and sex here is unadulterated purity and ecstasy, even religious ecstasy. And dharma, artha, kama, moksha are the four requisites of life fulfilled.

It is to this tradition that Husain belonged. The sadness is not only that the Sangh Parivar could not understand and tolerate him, it is that the state yielded ever so easily to this intolerance. The suggestion that Husain should have drawn nude female figures from Islamic mythology to balance it out is pathetic, for it looks at artistic creativity as a sort of Cabinet formation in which various communities, castes, regions, genders etc should find adequate representation. This is characteristic of small minds adjudicating grand phenomena.

* Harbans Mukhia is a former professor of history at the Jawaharlal Nehru University

SC defers hearing on ambiguity in OBC quota admission

The Supreme Court today declined to give any immediate direction on discrepancies in implementation of the reservation policy relating to OBC quota in central universities and posted the matter for hearing on July 4.

A vacation bench of justices P. Sathasivam and A.K. Patnaik directed that the matter be listed on Monday before the regular bench where the matter was already pending.

A bench headed by Justice R.V. Raveendran had been seized of the petition which pointed out the confusion prevailing in several universities, including Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) and Delhi University (DU) where admission process was in full swing.

The regular bench will decide whether the cut-off marks for the OBC candidates should be 10 per cent less than the marks fixed for the general category candidates or should it be 10 per cent relaxation in the minimum eligibility criteria.

The petitioner P.V. Indersan, a former professor of IIT Madras, had sought implementation of an earlier apex court verdict by which the constitutional validity of 27 per cent quota for OBC s in the Central Universities was upheld by it on April 10, 2008.

The vacation bench was informed that the three judges in a majority verdict had held that the cut-off marks for OBCs should not be less than five per cent or 10 per cent as against the general category candidates.

Senior advocate Indu Malhotra, appearing for the petitioner had submitted that Delhi University is following a different yardstick by which the gap in cut-off for OBC students and general category students should not be more than 10 per cent where as in JNU, the practice of 10 per cent relaxation in minimum eligibility criteria is being followed.

The petitioner also requested the apex court to stay the orders of the Delhi High Court which had on September 7, 2010, said the minimum eligibility criteria for admission under OBC category would be at a maximum 10 per cent below the minimum eligibility criteria fixed for the General category.

Requesting the apex court for an urgent hearing, the petitioner said results of the entrance examination of JNU for the current session have already been declared and interviews are scheduled from July 4 onwards.

The court, however, decided not to give an urgent hearing to the matter and posted it for Monday.

19 years after Babri demolition, Ram temple on backburner?

Almost two decades after the Babri mosque in Ayodhya was demolished by right-wing activists in the presence of senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leaders, the politics of Hindutva appear to have lost steam and the demand for the Ram temple less strident.

The 16th century mosque was razed on December 6, 1992 by Hindu mobs, who claimed it stood on the birthplace of Lord Ram and wanted a grand Ram temple constructed there.

While the Congress and the Left parties allege that the BJP had exploited the sentiments of the Hindus for political gains, the BJP maintains it has not given up the Ram temple issue but is giving primacy to other matters too.

The BJP had never been serious about the Ram temple, but exploited the sentiments of the Hindu community for political gains, Congress general secretary Rashid Alvi told IANS.

Their (BJPs) political graph has come down because of their divisive politics over the Ram mandir (temple), he said.

Now they do not talk much about the issue, claimed Alvi.

Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) politburo member S. Ramachandran Pillai told IANS that the Babri demolition had seriously harmed the democratic polity and secular fabric of the country.

But the passions have subsided and they are losing support, Pillai said about the BJP-supported Ram temple movement.

BJP chief Nitin Gadkari however told reporters recently that the party has not given up the Ram temple issue, but was giving more stress on economic issues.

I am from a new generation and it is natural that economic issues will receive emphasis, as also GDP, politics of development, progress, besides nationalism and good governance, he said.

Unfortunately the BJP has been given a tag of being communal which we are trying to remove, he added.

But, Mridula Mukherjee, professor in New Delhis Jawaharlal Nehru University, said it was an illusion if anyone believed that the BJP will shed its communal and Hindutva agenda, which according to political observers, played a major role in its steep rise - from two Lok Sabha seats in 1984 to 85 in 1989 and to 119 in 1991.

According to Mukherjee, there are pushes and pulls in the BJP which will bring the Ram temple issue to the fore and backburner occasionally.

But the core of the party remains to be the RSS (Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh) and the hardliners, she added.

The BJP will though find it hard to raise the issue much while it heads the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) with even its key ally, the Janata Dal-United (JD-U) terming the demolition a sad incident in our political history.

JD-U general secretary Javed Raza told IANS that the Babri demolition was a sad incident and a solution should be attempted through dialogue or judicial process.

On the ground, the day is unlikely to be tension-filled as it was in the 1990s. However, the union home ministry has asked the Uttar Pradesh government to step up security measures in Ayodhya and other communally sensitive places in the state on the anniversary.

It may have seemed the issue had achieved closure when in September last year, the Allahabad High Court ordered the division of the site of the razed mosque into three parts - two to Hindu institutions and one to the Sunni Waqf board.

However, both Hindu and Muslim groups appealed the verdict and the Supreme Court stayed the order in May 2011 saying the high court verdict was strange and surprising.

19 years after Babri demolition, Ram temple on backburner?

Almost two decades after the Babri mosque in Ayodhya was demolished by right-wing activists in the presence of senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leaders, the politics of Hindutva appear to have lost steam and the demand for the Ram temple less strident.

The 16th century mosque was razed on December 6, 1992 by Hindu mobs, who claimed it stood on the birthplace of Lord Ram and wanted a grand Ram temple constructed there.

While the Congress and the Left parties allege that the BJP had exploited the sentiments of the Hindus for political gains, the BJP maintains it has not given up the Ram temple issue but is giving primacy to other matters too.

The BJP had never been serious about the Ram temple, but exploited the sentiments of the Hindu community for political gains, Congress general secretary Rashid Alvi told IANS.

Their (BJPs) political graph has come down because of their divisive politics over the Ram mandir (temple), he said.

Now they do not talk much about the issue, claimed Alvi.

Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) politburo member S. Ramachandran Pillai told IANS that the Babri demolition had seriously harmed the democratic polity and secular fabric of the country.

But the passions have subsided and they are losing support, Pillai said about the BJP-supported Ram temple movement.

BJP chief Nitin Gadkari however told reporters recently that the party has not given up the Ram temple issue, but was giving more stress on economic issues.

I am from a new generation and it is natural that economic issues will receive emphasis, as also GDP, politics of development, progress, besides nationalism and good governance, he said.

Unfortunately the BJP has been given a tag of being communal which we are trying to remove, he added.

But, Mridula Mukherjee, professor in New Delhis Jawaharlal Nehru University, said it was an illusion if anyone believed that the BJP will shed its communal and Hindutva agenda, which according to political observers, played a major role in its steep rise - from two Lok Sabha seats in 1984 to 85 in 1989 and to 119 in 1991.

According to Mukherjee, there are pushes and pulls in the BJP which will bring the Ram temple issue to the fore and backburner occasionally.

But the core of the party remains to be the RSS (Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh) and the hardliners, she added.

The BJP will though find it hard to raise the issue much while it heads the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) with even its key ally, the Janata Dal-United (JD-U) terming the demolition a sad incident in our political history.

JD-U general secretary Javed Raza told IANS that the Babri demolition was a sad incident and a solution should be attempted through dialogue or judicial process.

On the ground, the day is unlikely to be tension-filled as it was in the 1990s. However, the union home ministry has asked the Uttar Pradesh government to step up security measures in Ayodhya and other communally sensitive places in the state on the anniversary.

It may have seemed the issue had achieved closure when in September last year, the Allahabad High Court ordered the division of the site of the razed mosque into three parts - two to Hindu institutions and one to the Sunni Waqf board.

However, both Hindu and Muslim groups appealed the verdict and the Supreme Court stayed the order in May 2011 saying the high court verdict was strange and surprising.

Sonam to play JNU girl opposite Dhanush in new film

Actress Sonam Kapoor has landed the role of a Varanasi girl, who studies in the capitals Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), in Raanjhanaa,-I>. She is cast opposite southern star Dhanush.

The decision was taken after intense discussions between director Aanand L.Rai of Tanu Weds Manu and Sonam.

As per the script, Dhanush plays a local Varanasi boy, and Sonam essays a Varanasi girl educated in Delhi.

Sonam will now spend time on the JNU campus to grasp the conduct and ideology of students there.

The culture of education at the JNU is radically different from other universities in Delhi and across the country. At JNU students, both male and female, are very politically aware, said a source from team of Raanjhanaa.

They talk intelligently on national issues. They dress sensibly, hang out at specific cafes in Delhi, attend seminars and protest actively on national issues. The director Aanand Kumar wanted Sonam to imbibe all of these traits. And they also speak fluent Hindi, the source added.


When it comes to her spoken Hindi, Sonam, according to the source, needs to work as hard as Dhanush.

Dhanush is in Mumbai working on the dubbing of the Hindi version of his wifes film 3. He has been working with a Hindi coach, trying to get the language right.

For Sonam too, its been decided that her accented Hindi and the haute-couture look just wont do for the film.

However, Sonam does not really play the quintessential Varanasi girl. Her character is that of a local girl who has been to college in Delhi for three years, and returned to her home town as quite the sophisticated small-towner with an acquired metropolitan air, says a source close to the project.

At first the director was not sure if Sonam could carry off the role. But after meeting her, he was convinced.

I am bowled over by her commitment to get the nuances of the role right. Ive found my lady, said Rai.

IITs among the worlds best

The Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs)
figure among recently-released subject-wise rankings of the worlds top 100 universities.

Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) recently unveiled the subject-wise rankings, following the release of the 2010 World University Rankings last September. The subjects have been broadly classified into arts and humanities, engineering and technology, social sciences and management, natural sciences, and life sciences and medicine.

The first series of the four-part release of the rankings will be engineering and information technology disciplines, revealing the worlds best universities for computer science, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering and civil engineering. QS is going to reveal rankings for biomedicine and life sciences, natural sciences, arts and humanities and social sciences disciplines separate groups throughout 2011.

The engineering and technology rankings place IIT Bombay at the 46th position and IIT Delhi at 52nd. IIT Kanpur follows at 63rd and IIT Madras at 68th.

The arts and humanities rankings have Delhis Jawaharlal Nehru University and University of Delhi listed at 128 and 133, respectively. The University of Mumbai, the University of Calcutta and the University of Pune are also found in the list.

Talking about the need for subject based rankings, Ben Sowter, head of research, said, Students around the world are interested not only in identifying the universities that match their aspirations but also in a comparative tool at the disciplinary level. There is a clear demand for ways to compare the effectiveness of higher education institutions in narrower subject disciplines. After all, the majority of prospective international students know what they want to study before asking themselves where they want to study.

In compiling these rankings, QS is taking into account views of academicians, opinion of the employers and citations per paper as a measure of a key aspect of the research activity. QS World University Rankings by Subject and details of the methodology are available at www.topuniversities.com.

Dog menace hounds JNU students

Dog menace is back to hound students at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), and this time, visually-impaired students are at the receiving end. Members of the JNU Vision Forum and other students, working for the rights of the visually-impaired, held a protest outside the administrative office of the university demanding that the rights of the affected students be protected.

Holding placards reading Animal rights are not above human rights, students also submitted a memorandum to the vice chancellor asking for a permanent solution to the problem. Dogs are everywhere on the campus, in hostels, cafeteria, dhabas, and also washrooms. For students like me, who are visually-impaired, it has become a serious issue. Sometimes we step on them unknowingly and they bite us, said Sonu Yadav, convener, JNU Vision Forum. Yadav was bitten by a dog a month ago. Attendants at the JNU health centre said they received around 15 cases of dog bites every month. The number of patients that come to us for anti-rabies vaccine is high, said an attendant. The protesting students said the authorities had made efforts to address the problem but no solution had been found.

The vice chancellor has assured us that a solution will be found, said Sidhartha, a student at the Centre for Political Studies. Earlier, the Supreme Court had asked the authorities to set aside specific feeding sites for dogs. But not many adhere to these guidelines.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/NewDelhi/JNU-approves-quotas-till-professor-level/Article1-770646.aspx

The executive council (EC) of Jawaharlal Nehru University — the highest decision making body of the institution — has approved the principle of reservation in faculty positions at the higher levels, viz professor and associate professor.

The EC ratified the decision to extend reservation
to all levels in its meeting on Monday, a JNU EC member told.

This is in conformity with the UGC guidelines issued in 2006 extending quotas to all levels rather than just the entry level.
Though the DU EC approved these guidelines in 2008, no advertisements have been brought out yet.
I raised the issue in the last academic council meet in October, but the university continues to dither, remaining the only prominent exception among central universities not to implement the guidelines, DU AC member Sanjay Kumar said.
Sources say the JNU and DU were the only prominent institutions that had not approved quotas at all levels till now. JNUs approval is likely to put additional pressure on DU to implement the guidelines.
However, the JNU decision comes after a wide division within the university on the matter, with key academics like Bipan Chandra, YK Alagh, Yogendra Singh, CP Bhambri and Asis Dutta writing to the EC chairman a year back that quotas at higher levels would lead to a decline of the institution, a centre of excellence that the disadvantaged could access inexpensively as students.
However, those supporting quotas cite them as flowing from the Constitution and the 2006 UGC guidelines.
JNU brought out an advertisement in 2009 reserving posts at all levels, but it lapsed amid divisions on the issue. The anti-quota group complained that 84 of 149 faculty positions announced in the ad were reserved. The JNU academic council also sought the responses of various centres and sources say seven centres ruled against quotas, four said yes and seven others suggested legal opinion.

JNU fire ignites hopes for Jamia students

While there seems to be a glimmer of hope for Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) in terms of the students union elections, at Jamia Millia Islamia, the elections still remain a big question mark.

The students union at Jamia was dissolved on March 31, 2006, and since then,
the university has not had fresh elections.
The university is charging a student union fee but has had no union since 2006. Even though the Academic Council — the highest decision-making body of the university — in 2005 had clearly stated that elections should be held, this has not been taken into account, said Afroz Alam Sahil, member, Forum for Student Democracy.
The university administration had maintained that elections will be held when the environment is conducive for student elections.
The Vice-Chancellor, Najeeb Jung, had earlier stated that a committee was looking into the matter and that a decision will be taken only after the committee comes out with the report. No report has been released so far.
Meanwhile, the students have a varying opinion on the election issue. In principle, every university should have a body that represents the students. In fact, every department should also have a body that looks into the welfare of the students. Five years is a long time and I hope that the verdict on JNU elections is going to have a positive effect on our administration, said Anant Verma, a second year BTech student at Jamia.
However, according to some students, the union is unnecessary. I dont think the students union work for the welfare of the students, so there is no point of having a union. In principle, it makes sense but in reality it is irrelevant. The Delhi University Students Union is a good example of this, said Kavita Narayan, a BA student.

International Socrates Award for JNU V-C

BB Bhattacharya, the Vice Chancellor of Jawaharlal Nehru University will be honoured the prestigious International Socrates Award for his contribution in the field of Economics.

Eminent people from all over the world will be awarded at the Oxford Summit for Leaders to be held at the
Oxford Town Hall in the United Kingdom on September 24. Others leaders in the field of Business, Science and Culture will also be awarded at the event.

An economist, researcher and now administrator, Bhattacharya is one of the very few Indians to be given this honour.

Prior to the ceremony, Bhattacharya will address the Summer University of European Parliament in Versova in France.

I feel happy that even Europeans have started taking note of Indian talent and potential. We Indian academicians work under humble conditions all our life. I feel honoured that our lifelong pursuit of knowledge is being recognised, said an elated Bhattacharya.

Earlier Indian academicians were rarely recognised. With the opening up of economies and greater interaction, the scene is different, where more scientists, economists, professors are slowly getting their dues.

JNU students against grading system

The percentage system for grading performance of students at Jawahar Lal Nehru University (JNU), generated a controversy with angry students launching a signature campaign on Thursday.

Later the authorities said that they would consider the matter at an academic council meeting.
Rajinder Prasad, Director of JNU said, We assured the students that we would consider their demands and have asked them to give us a written representation of their proposed solutions to this problem.
The JNU administration had proposed a new formula for converting grades scored by students into percentage. However, the JNU students seeking admissions and employment outside began facing problems because of this system as their scope for appearing in any other exam or research work was limited, said a students union member.
Earlier, a student getting B grade or Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 5 on a scale of 9, was eligible for National Eligibility Test (NET) which has to be qualified to be a lecturer. However, as per the new formula, anyone getting a Grade B or scoring 5 would get 52.5 per cent, which is less than the minimum criteria to appear for the NET examination.

In certain cases like the university itself, the minimum criteria for admission in some courses is 55 per cent. For a student who gets a score of 8.5 and the percentage is 80 per cent, but for someone who gets a score of 9, the percentage is 100 per cent.

This implies that there is an increase of 20 per cent for an improvement of only 0.5 grade points. On the other hand, if the student has 4.5 then he scores 50 per cent, but if he has a score of 5.5, then he scores 55 per cent.

When backward is forward

Mark Twain famously said that there are lies, damn lies and statistics. Substitute statistics for psephology and the adage still rings true. But strictly speaking psephologists are not liars but in error. They believe what they say and are always shocked when they get it wrong. The error is not in the stars but in the way psephologists look at Indian society. For them village India is racked by caste wars and each caste is battling against another in a constant struggle for supremacy. So statistics pour out of the psephologists machine that announce, for example, that 21 per cent Lodhs voted for the Samajwadi Party and 50 per cent Brahmins for BJP, and so on. In doing so psephologists make three cardinal mistakes, perhaps in the belief that if two wrongs dont make a right, lets try for the third.
The first error is that psephologists either dont realise that there are far too many castes even in an assembly constituency than there are candidates. So even a die-hard casteist voter will, in all likelihood, have to opt for someone who does not belong to the same jati. There are roughly 20-25 such castes in each constituency and not an equal number of serious contenders for power. So rural voters have to eventually decide on a candidate on matters other than the caste to which he-she belongs. There is just no other option. It is hardly as if there is one candidate for every caste in every constituency.

Psephologists make their second error when they say that each caste issues a kind of whip commandeering its members to vote for one party or the other. According to them, the rural Indian cannot think independently and responds slavishly to the call of caste. This is a ridiculous idea. Anyone who is familiar with village India will know that not only is the bush telegraph more fiction than fact, but so is the idea of a bumbling rural idiot. The everyday village voter is not hopelessly tied to cultural genes. He considers other variables before approaching the ballot box.

As this point is missed out by psephologists, they see no problem in churning out figures like 21 per cent Lodhs voted for the Samajwadi Party and 50 per cent Brahmins for BJP. Even if one accepts these spurious facts, the psephologists should have logically gone on to inquire into whose arms have the remaining 79 per cent Lodhs and 50 per cent Brahmins fled? Why did they vote differently? Surely, these are good follow-up questions, but psephologists never ask them.
As a consequence of the first two errors, the psephologist commits the further mistake in believing that on account of the purity-pollution hierarchy, OBCs like Gujjars and Jats, or forwards like Brahmins and Baniyas, or Scheduled Castes, Harijans and Valmikis spontaneously strike a political accord. So if there is a caste correlation that appears to fit this mould even partially, no further explanation is required.

The truth again is very different. Gujjars are not the natural allies of Jats just because both are clubbed as OBCs rather generously by Mandalites. Jats hate Gujjars and this sentiment is reciprocated. There are Gujjar tales of Jat opportunism and Jats have popular fables of alleged Gujjar cowardice. Similar discords exist between Baniyas, Brahmins and Rajputs as between members of different Scheduled Castes. If there is a single feature that characterises caste relations across the board it is one of mutual repulsion.

Now we are ready to appreciate why the recent poll predictions were almost entirely in error. None of the psephologists predicted that the BSP would get an absolute majority simply because they fractionated voters minutely by caste. These pollsters would have done better if they had asked on what grounds members of different castes coalesce politically. As the UP election has shown, jati loyalty is not the key. The emergence of a degree of caste correlation with electoral outcome is because economic, social and structural considerations bring otherwise hostile jatis together in caste blocks or clusters.

Mayawati knows only too well that caste battles are fought on shifting sands. It is much better to seek partners who have common enemies and common aspirations, and hang prior enmities. As both upper castes and scheduled castes see the OBC threatening their lives and livelihood, it makes good political sense to get these traditional polar opposites together. This is a truth that Mayawati grasped easily but it escaped the psephologist who is burdened by elitist textbook readings of caste.

As Indian society is just coming out of the natural economy of a stagnant village, there is still the hangover of the past in terms of occupations and secular opportunities. Scheduled castes who were not allowed to own land or train themselves in socially valuable skills are even today at the bottom of the heap. Their aspirations are, therefore, quite different from those of the Jats, Gujjars, Kurmis and Koeris.

These so-called backwards still call the shots in rural India because they are educationally and economically better-off than the scheduled castes and, hence, better networked with state agencies and functionaries. As they have greater control over state resources, they corner a larger chunk of its largesse as well. Not surprisingly, they are also the primary sponsors of the pro-Mandal movement. It is widely known that some of the worst thugs in Uttar Pradesh come from the fold of the backwards, but what should be equally appreciated is that the village-based scheduled castes face the brunt of their violence.

Brahmins and Baniyas matter little to the poor rural Dalits. These so-called forwards are physically scarce and politically insignificant in rural India. Land reforms and sub-division of holdings drove the traditional upper castes away from the village. They left behind a vacuum that was energetically filled by the backwards. It is, therefore, easier for the so-called forwards to link with scheduled castes, and vice-versa, today because they have no secular interests that pit them against each other. If each of these three major caste categories, the forwards, backwards and scheduled castes, are politically significant, as in this election, it is because powerful secular interests bind them together. It is caste blocks such as these that function as political actors and not fractionated entities like Lodhs, Kurmis, Brahmins, Baniyas, etc.

In the not too distant future, these large unities might get internally differentiated. This would then prompt leaders like Mayawati to reinvent themselves and find new friends and enemies, with secular arithmetic and caste chemistry as their guides.But psephologists need to reinvent themselves in a hurry. By insisting on the pre-eminence of caste round the clock during election time they are not only wrong, but also dangerous. Incorrect though they are on every count, they succeed, however, in a somewhat devious way. They are successfully able to pander to popular prejudice by continuously harping on individual caste identities. It is in this sense that they play a negative social role that borders on the subversive.Dipankar Gupta is Professor of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

JNU vice-chancellor may get to serve second time

Jawaharlal Nehru Universitys Vice-Chancellor BB Bhattacharya may well be headed for a second term. Sources said the issue will be raised in the Executive Council (EC) meeting on Tuesday. The EC, which consists of 15 members including 3 elected, 4 from outside the university, 5 deans, the V-C and registrar, will discuss an amendment in the JNU Act.
The present provision in the act says that the V-C will serve for years or till the age of 70, whichever is earlier, and will not be eligible for re-appointment.

The proposed change in the act states that the V-C will now be eligible for a second term. The students and teachers have alleged that the administration is trying to tamper with the very ethos that define JNU with such an amendment.
The V-C has violated all the progressive laws like implementation of reservations for faculty posts for the SC-ST and OBC reservation of students. He is hardly in the university to sort our issues. I wonder on what grounds is he seeking an extension and amendment of the act? said Sucheta De, a member of All India Students Association.

On Monday, Jawaharlal Nehru University Teachers Association also opposed the move to change the JNU Act. Meanwhile, the students of the varsity observed a strike against what they term as the JNU administrations repeated moves to scuttle SC-ST reservations for faculty posts and OBC reservations for students.

The students also demonstrated at the University Grants Commission and a delegation of representatives submitted a memorandum to the UGC Chairperson, asking him to urgently intervene and ensure that the constitutional and legal provisions of social justice be upheld in JNU.

Move to extend JNU VCs term; students, teachers not amused

The attempt to extend the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) Vice Chancellors tenure by another term has now found its strongest opposition in shape of an approaching referendum on April 20. The varsity has been trying to amend its Act in order to make the VC eligible for a second term. The issue was raised during the Executive Council (EC) meeting held on April 6. The EC, however, could not reach a consensus on the issue.The present provision in the JNU Act mentions that the vice chancellor will serve a period of 5 years or till the age of 70 whichever is earlier and will be ineligible for re-appointment.

Current VC B.B. Bhattacharyas tenure ends in June.The proposal for term extension has ruffled feathers, especially among students. To express their disapproval, the students will hold a direct vote to reject the proposal entirely. A referendum of this nature will be a first in the varsitys history.Student groups on campus — All India Students Association, National Students Union of India, Democratic Students Union and Students Federation of India, among others — have issued a common appeal to unite against the attempt and vote on April 20.Such a move will set a fundamentally dangerous precedent for our university and must be unequivocally rejected. We also condemn the fact that such a decision was being sought to be pushed through in the EC without consultation with any section of the university community, said the joint statement issued by the student groups.

Teachers have already expressed their disapproval through a memorandum submitted to the VC just a day before the EC meeting. They had asked him to remove the issue from the agenda of the EC.

JNUs special sammelan

Holi celebrations at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) begin tonight with the famous Chaat Sammelan. Students at the universitys Jhelum Hostel organise the popular event annually on the eve of chhoti holi. The whole concept involves choosing the most boring person through competitions and that person is declared the Chaat Samrat.

Dhananjay Tripathi, former president of the JNU Students Union, says, A baraat is taken out from Tapti hostel to Jhelum after the Chaat Samrat has been chosen. The winner is made to sit on the donkey and people dance to the beats of the dhol and music in this procession.

Participants in the competition are judged on their ability to bore people. They may sing or tell boring jokes. Students start looking for a donkey days in advance. Judges include JNU alumni and Shahzad Ibrahim, also known as Mamu, who runs a dhaba on campus.

Ibrahim and his friends started the Chaat Sammelan in 1993. It would initially take place at Jhelum Hostel but now, it takes places in the lawns of Jhelum as students across JNU participate in it.

I was one of the first participants of the sammelan, says Mamu. Till the time I was there, nobody could win this competition. Finally, they asked me to let others win.Mamu dresses for the occasion according to a different theme every year. Last year, I dressed in white bandages and put red ointment. I said that lots of people owed me money and when I asked them to settle the account, they beat me up. This is a short speech I give every year, he says.

In the past, the winner was garlanded with a necklace of shoes and sandals. Now, he or she gets boxes of gujiya — prepared at Mamus dhaba, of course.

We want people from all across India to apply for Fulbright fellowships, says USIEF Rahat Bano, Hindustan Times

The Fulbright scholarships arent just for people from Jawaharlal Nehru University and the University of Delhi, says Sarina Paranjape, Indian Programme Officer, United States-India Educational Foundation (USIEF).

We want people from all across to apply. Its open competition … The emphasis is on quality but there have been small groups of people in the cohort from those (small town) institutions.

Scholars include some people for whom its just another fellowship as well as others for whom it is really a stepping stone.

The spectrum is visible at a pre-departure orientation USIEF held for the first batch of Fulbright-Nehru fellows, renamed thus after India became a full funding partner in the fellowship agreement in July 2008.

Under the amended agreement, USIEF has given 75 Fulbright-Nehru scholarships for 2009-10. In all, its giving 126 Fulbright-Nehru, other Fulbright and non-Fulbright grants for 2009-10.

In different sessions, officials as well as current and former Fulbrighters dispensed with advice on readying for the American experience. There are queries on Indias caste system, poverty, secularism, dynasty, gender issues (female infanticide, dowry) and finally Bollywood, says Kavita Sharma, Director, India International Centre, New Delhi and 2007 Fulbright New Century Scholar.

Nathan N Tabor, a 2008 US Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Scholar, says, Someone into his third divorce might ask you how could you have an arranged marriage. Also, you might be quizzed on your culture. Not Indian culture. Indian culture is a non-entity, says Tabor.

Michael P Macy, Counsellor for Cultural Affairs, US Embassy, suggests these tips to the US-bound scholars:

Go there with few expectations. People come here and expect to see elephants and tigers on the streets. The same way, the myths about America are not true.

Allow yourself to be shocked, but not appalled.

Youve got to ask questions. What drives the academic process in the US is questions.

Go open-minded and open-hearted.

Americans dont care who you are, who your parents and grandparents were or what titles they had. They want to know what you can do and what you do.

You might run into people who are small-minded like in any part of the world. But youll enjoy being there.
The first batch of Fulbright-Nehru scholars at the orientation ceremony. Seen here seated at the centre of the front row are Adam Grotsky, Director, USIEF; Larry Schwartz, Minister Counselor for Public affairs, US Embassy; and Virender Gupta, Director, Indian Council for Cultural Relations
Two fellows talk about how they made it
Deepti Adlakha, 24, architect, Fulbright-Nehru Masters Fellow, going to pursue Masters in urban design at Washington University in St Louis:

The interview was very pleasant. They look at how enthusiastic you are, how much passion you have. They asked me about the environment in India and how our Indian design teachings have been sidelined while we are aping the West. They look at your academic record. How serious you have been. They ask questions about your dissertation (which was part of my BArch programme), any research youve done. They ask where youve worked, the objectives of doing a Masters, how youd contribute to your society.
Ambarien Alqadar, 29, Assistant Professor, Video and Television Department, Jamia Millia Islamia Fulbright-Nehru Masters Fellow, going to study communication studies (film-cinema) at Temple University:

You require a portfolio through which you can demonstrate your skills. Writing my proposal took a long time - about one month. The proposal involves spelling out what you have to do, where you stand now, what you plan to do. The interview is fairly much about what youve written. You should be able to explain what you wrote. The questions included those like what does leadership mean to you? I was also told You should be very aware of what you are stepping into.

JNU rusticates nine students for ragging

Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) on Wednesday rusticated nine students for two years after they were found guilty of ragging their juniors. The university also expelled another 10 students from the hostel for a year for abetting the act. JNU had reported its first case ever on August 12 after the anti-ragging squad caught four MCA students red-handed in a room of Sabatrmati Hostel.

The incident tainted the varsitys 40-year-old record of not having any such cases.
Desperate to salvage its clean image, JNU also put the blame on the engineering background of the MCA students for ragging on campus.

Technical institutes have a history of ragging. Since most of the MCA students come from engineering colleges, they think its not a big deal, said H.C. Bohidar, chief proctor, who also headed the inquiry.
The inquiry committee interrogated 40 MCA students. Three out of the 19 students indicted are girls.
The proctorial committee submitted the inquiry report to the vice-chancellor on Wednesday. It found nine students guilty of ragging and 10 guilty of abetment, said Ramadhikari Kumar, rector, Students Affair.
The incident came to light last week after an MCA fresher, Balbir Chand, tipped off the anti-ragging squad.
The proctor said Chand has chosen not to live in the campus for the time being.
Rusticated students cannot enter the campus for two years, which essentially means four semesters.
It also means the varsity would decide if the students could be readmitted in the future.

JNU freshers write to V-C, say they werent ragged

In a new twist to the alleged ragging incident reported from Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) last week, a group of senior students and freshers have come out in the open challenging the charges. JNU authorities rusticated nine students and expelled another 10 from the hostel soon after the news of ragging reached them.
Fourteen students from the Computer Science department have addressed individual letters to Vice-Chanchellor BB Bhattacharya, the Anti Ragging Committee and the Chief Proctor refuting the ragging charges.
Interestingly, one of the signatories in the letter campaign is Balbir Chand, the fresher who had lodged a complaint in the first place. Chand was unavailable for comment on why he filed the initial complaint.
Sneh Srivastava, a first semester MCA student said, I was one of the four juniors in the room at the time. We had gone to the seniors room to discuss an upcoming seminar. The anti-ragging squad just swooped in and without even listening to us concluded that we have been ragged.
She added, I have written three letters describing the sequence of event but the authorities were adamant on punishing the seniors.

Rajesh Kumar, a recent pass out from the computer science department, said: It is shocking that the authorities have paid no heed to the lives of the seniors involved before rusticating them. The evidence is as baseless as the charge and a clear divisive policy is evident, he said.

The students fighting against the judgment claim that they took time to come out with the facts because they lack a proper union. Students from other departments feel, however, that this is a last ditch attempt to save the image of the department.

Says Neeraj Jha, a PhD student at School of International Studies (SIS), It is difficult to ascertain the degree of ragging if it happened at all. Although I feel the punishment was harsh, the recent protest is just a way of saving face.

SAARC varsity to start from JNU campus

The proposed SAARC university will start functioning from a temporary campus in Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) this year with 50 students in two Masters courses. JNU on Wednesday agreed to provide the School of Physical Sciences building as a makeshift campus of the SAARC university which will offer Masters in Development Economics and Masters in Computer Application where students from all the eight member countries can apply.

JNU Vice-Chancellor Prof B.B. Bhattacharya in a letter sent to SAARC University CEO Prof G.K. Chadha, said the building can be used for a year for running classes and administrative purposes.JNU has been extremely kind to grant us the space for the university. This will be a good beginning for the university, said Chaddha.The campus of the university will be set up later, for which land is being acquired in Mehrauli in South Delhi. Each course will have 25 students each. While 50 per cent of the seats will go to the host country, India, smaller countries will get minimum four per cent of seats.
Admission for the programmes will be carried out in July and classes are expected to start in August this year.

JNU forms panel to hunt for new V-C

The search for the next head of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) is set to begin soon as the varsity has finally constituted a committee for this purpose. The search committee comprises three members. Two of them are the JNU-nominees. JNU has shortlisted Professor P. Balaram, director, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and Nitin Desai, distinguished visiting fellow at The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) as its nominees. Balaram, who was awarded the Padma Shri in 2002, is a professor of Molecular Biophysics and is the author of over 400 research papers.

Desai, on the other hand, has had a long association with the government as he has worked in the Planning Commission from 1973 to 1987 and also been the chief economic adviser in the department of economic affairs. He retired from the United Nations in 2003 as the under-secretary general for economic and social affairs. JNU will forward their names to the Ministry of Human Resource and Development in the next few days. The third nominee, who will also head the search committee, will be chosen by the Visitor of JNU — the President of India in this case.

The constitution of the search committee comes after the Executive Council (the highest decision making body) of JNU shot down the proposal of extending the current Vice-Chancellor B.B. Bhattacharyas term in its meeting held on April 27. Bhattacharya steps down as V-C on June 29.

JNU still far from student union polls

The stalemate over Jawarharlal Lal Nehru University students union election continues with the Supreme Court on Monday refusing to relax the recommendations of Lyngdoh committee guidelines on student elections in colleges. A bench headed by Chief Justice K.G. Balakrishnan initially agreed to deviate from the guidelines and had permitted elections to take place in JNU by relaxing the upper age limit of 28 years and doing away with the restriction on the number of chance for candidates to contest the polls.

But when JNUSU counsel Sanjay Parikh objected to elections taking place in accordance with the remaining guidelines of the Lyngdoh committee, the bench declined to pass the order and adjourned the case to July.
Parikh argued that JNUSU would conduct elections as per the university rules and regulations, which also form the basis of the Lyngdoh committee report.

Solicitor General Gopal Subramanium, assisting the court in the matter, however, favoured adherence to the Lyngdoh Committees recommendation in toto.Parikh opposed Subramaniums contention and said if the recommendations were accepted in full, the very edifice on which the elections are held would be lost.
He said, The model adopted by JNU for its students union election has been praised by the Lyngdoh committee also, as it is free from money and muscle power.We will not pass any order now and hear the matter in July, the court said, when the contesting parties failed to reach a consensus for holding elections in the university.
The elections to JNUs students union was stayed by the apex court in October 2008 after Subramanium had moved an application in 2007 stating that two conditions — upper age limit of 28 years and one chance for contesting the elections — recommended by the Lyngdoh Committee were violated in JNU.

JNU VC selection panel to hear teachers, students

Students and teachers of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) will get to share what they expect from their Vice Chancellor (VC) with the human resource development ministrys selection panel, tasked with picking a new VC for the varsity.

In a break from normal, practice, the selection panel headed by former Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman K Kasturirangan has asked the human resource development ministry (HRD) to organise meetings with Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) students and teachers before it shortlists candidates.

The idea is aimed at ensuring that the concerns of teachers and students and their expectations from their VC are taken into account, while making the selection, said a member of the panel, that also includes economist Nitin Desai and Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, director P Balaram.The panel is likely to meet representatives of students and teachers over the coming fortnight.

Outgoing VC BB Bhattacharyas tenure is over but he is handling administrative matters till his successor takes over.
The selection panel, under Kasturirangan, held its first meeting today.Though this is not the first time that a selection panel will be meeting teachers and students, before picking its nominees for the post of VC of a university, it is extremely rare, sources said.

Selection panels normally invite applications from eligible candidates, scrutinise applications and then call shortlisted candidates for interviews before finalising its selected candidates. The entire process is usually conducted behind closed doors and away from public scrutiny.

JNU, however, has an extremely politicised student and teacher fraternity and the selection panel is keen to get their views on board, before picking a VC, panel sources said. This may help prevent later tensions between the university community and their new VC, sources said.

Genetic engineer set to be new JNU VC

Eminent genetic engineer Sudhir Kumar Sopory has emerged as a frontrunner for the post of the new vice chancellor of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), ending months of hectic lobbying for one of the most coveted posts in Indian academics. The President of India - who is Visitor to all

central higher educational institutions, including JNU - is expected to soon appoint Sopory from a panel of four names submitted by the human resource development (HRD) ministry. Sources in the Presidents Secretariat told that the short-listed names, with Sopory as the recommended candidate, reached them on Thursday evening. But other government sources advised caution in suggesting Sopory as the Visitors automatic choice.

The panel of four short-listed names does not include Hyderabad University vice chancellor Sayed Ehtasham Hasnain, who was considered by some to be a frontrunner for the post. JNU professors Zoya Hasan and Jayati Ghosh were also understood to have been in the race for the post. The new VC will replace economist BB Bhattacharya, the outgoing VC, whose term ended in June this year.

Sopory, a recipient of the Bhatnagar Award, is an elected fellow of each of Indias three science academies - the Indian National Science Academy, the Indian Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. If picked by the President for the post, Sopory will not need to shift far from his current office. He is a senior scientist in plant molecular biology at the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB).
Sopory completed his masters in Jammu and Kashmir before moving to Delhi University for his PhD.

JNU split over quota for faculty

The issue of reservation for senior faculty positions has split Delhis Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) right in the middle, triggering a politics of identity. The University Grants Commission (UGC), a regulatory body, had in 2006 issued guidelines extending quota to the ranks of professor and associate professor. Earlier, reservation was provided at entry-level — assistant professor. Those favouring quota say very few from the weaker sections have made to the senior ranks, those against say it will compromise merit.

JNU is debating the matter months after it called applications for senior positions in compliance with the guidelines.
While Delhi University has ignored the UGC norms, JNU, too, seems to be dithering. After a heated discussion at the executive council meet on Tuesday, impasse remains.

Both camps have claimed victory. Vice-Chancellor B.B. Bhattacharya has chosen silence and the UGC is not pleased. If any university takes a view contrary to the 2006 guidelines, itll be against government policy, UGC Secretary RK Chauhan told. Any university getting public money must follow public policy. All central universities, but DU, had accepted the norms, he said.

Ten per cent of DUs non-plan grant has been withheld. This new step, which is not legally binding on JNU, has been taken without wide consultation with the faculty, those anti the guidelines wrote to Bhattacharya. Four former JNU V-Cs, including Asis Dutta and Y.K. Alagh, are among them. They argue that not all guidelines are mandatory, and many have been ignored earlier.

The pro-quota groups argument: till 2006, only 11 of 1,430 professors in 20 central universities were Dalits, and only 17 from the Scheduled Tribes (STs). While 29 of 2,592 associate professors were Dalits, only 31 were STs. The anti-quota camps grouse: 20 of 38 professor positions, and 31 of 53 associate professor positions advertised in 2009 are reserved.

At JNU food fest, a mouthful of politics

Eating Yakitori, Shapta Tingmo and Falafel might not be something many associate with the Republic Day but for students at Jawaharlal Nehru University, it is nothing short of a tradition. Every January 26, an international food festival is held at JNU. Visitors can gorge on cuisines from various countries at this 15-year-old festival.

The cooks in the hostels at JNU do not work on Republic Day and all the hostellers come here to eat, said Yoshito Takakura, 31, a JNU student from Japan who was serving Yakitori (Japanese Grilled chicken) at the stall.
But the festival is not about just food. For me, its an opportunity to assert my political identity, said Hassan 25, from Palestine, who was serving falafel. We, too, have a Republic Day in Palestine but our celebrations are a very low-key. We want to project our country as an independent nation and this gives us an opportunity to do so. Plus, its a lot of fun, he said.

Students at the Tibetan stall have a similar reason. We want to spread awareness about the Tibetan struggle for statehood and we use any opportunity we get. Also, everyone appreciates the food and the stall does good business, said Sonam Tobgyal, 23, a Delhi University student.

The fest was organised by Students for Harmony and Foreign Students Association.
For Ye Xing, 24, the fest was an opportunity to show people what authentic Chinese food tastes like. The Chinese food you get here is different from the real thing. This festival has given us the perfect opportunity to let people experience what real Chinese food tastes like, Xing said.

Students union to boycott classes at JNU

The struggle to have student elections as soon as possible at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) has intensified. After declaring an indefinite hunger strike on Thursday evening, members of student parties - Students Federation of India (SFI) and All India Students Association (AISA) - have called for a indefinite boycott of classes.

The indefinite hunger strike is demanding the constitution of the Grievance Redressal Committee as per the Supreme Court (SC) order so that the JNU students union Election Committee can announce the dates for the elections. Till now, the administration has not given any commitment on the formation of the Grievance Redressal Committee. If there is no decision soon, we will call for boycott of classes and a complete strike, said Zico Dasgupta, vice-president, SFI.
The University General Body Meeting, the highest decision-making body of JNU students, had passed a resolution for holding JNUSU elections after the SC gave elections in the university a go ahead with a few riders. The resolution had also said that the elections should be held before February 9.

The JNU administration has written to the students on Friday, pledging their commitment over holding elections.
The notice said that the university had sought clarification from the SC after an objection on conducting elections in the current semester had been raised, citing the clause in Lyngdoh recommendations which say that the elections can be held only within six to eight weeks of opening of the new academic session.

Holding elections as per SC guidelines in this semester as a one-time arrangement would not invite contempt from the SC in any conceivable manner. By waiting for further clarification, the administration is being insensitive to the overwhelming opinion within the student community for conducting JNUSU Elections immediately, said Roshan Kishore, member, SFI.

Striking JNU students demand election in Feb 1st week

The indefinite hunger strike by students of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) entered its fifth day on Monday with many classes also being disrupted.

The strike was started on Thursday by members of the Students Federation of India (SFI) and All India Students Association (AISA) in response to the lackadaisical attitude of the JNU administration in deciding upon an election date and setting up a grievance redressal committee.

Our call for a complete university strike was successful. Mondays successful strike and massive protest demo is a clear warning to the administration that the student community will further intensify the struggle until the Grievance Redressal Committee is constituted and elections are held within the first week of February as per the mandate of the University General Body Meeting, said Zico Dasgupta, vice-president, SFI, JNU.

The JNU administration, meanwhile, stated that it is waiting for the legal counsel regarding the election date as the Lyngdoh Committee Report states that elections have to be held within six to eight weeks of the new academic session.

Trio convicted for murder of JNU student leader in 1997

A CBI court on Tuesday convicted three persons for the murder of Jawaharlal Nehru University students union former president Chandrashekhar 15 years ago. The quantum of punishment would be pronounced on March 22.
Special CBI court judge Dhirendra Kumar Pandey convicted Dhruv Kumar Jaiswal, Sheikh Munna Khan and Iliyas Bari under Sections 302, 307, 120B-34 of the IPC, and Section 27 of the Arms Act.

Chandrashekhar was shot dead, and several others injured, at a CPI(M-L) Liberation rally in Siwan on March 31, 1997.
Two of the injured — Shyamnarayan Yadav and Bhutti Mian — died later.

CPI(M-L) Liberation leader Rameshchandra Kushwaha lodged an FIR against the three persons, charging them with the murder of Chandrashekhar. The state government subsequently handed over the probe to the CBI. c1

Hunger strike at JNU for sanitation workers rights

From the past two days, Sheetal Jha (name changed) is on leave from her office. However, she is not on a vacation. Jha is sitting on an indefinite hunger strike to protest the inhuman treatment meted out to the sanitation workers at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU).

Residents of the Yamuna working womens hostel in JNU have raised their voice against the authoritarian nature of their former warden and the non-payment of dues to the sanitation workers. The wages of the workers were being deducted illegally. They were being physically and verbally abused. While an inquiry conducted by the administration revealed that wages were indeed deducted, no probe has been initiated into the matter, said Jha, who did not reveal her real name.
The residents of the hostel, many of whom are students at JNU and are simultaneously working as well, are now demanding that the sanitation workers be paid the dues and that a new warden be appointed immediately.

Even though the warden has been removed from her post after the inquiry, she is occupying the official residence in the hostel. Till the time she vacates it, we will not get a new warden. Moreover, she has been threatening to evict us from the hostel, Jha added.

The students have written a letter to the vice-chancellor and have also appealed to the newly elected JNU students union to intervene and ensure justice to the workers.The university administration, meanwhile, has said that a new warden will be appointed soon. We undertook an inquiry against the former warden. The process of appointing a new warden will also be completed soon, said a university official.

2 BTech students arrested for theft at JNU Campus

Two B.Tech students, who entered the world of crime after losing a lot of money in cricket betting, have been arrested by the Delhi Police for allegedly committing a theft at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) in south Delhi. The accused have been identified as Bhagat Singh and Shashwat Biswal, sons of employees of IIT-Delhi. They are pursuing second year B.Tech from a private college, the police said.

On March 14, Singh and Biswal had allegedly stolen three credit cards, PAN card, identity card and purse from the office of Vyjayanti Raghavan, an Associate Professor in JNUs School of Language, Literature and Culture Study, where she teaches Korean, the police said.

They were found in suspicious circumstances near a teachers room and were spotted by Raghavan, who identified them and raised an alarm, said a police officer, adding that Raghavans belongings were stolen from her office when she had gone out for five minutes.

11% seats in JNU went unfilled: CAG

NEW DELHI: Despite a severe shortage of seats in universities, 11% seats in Jawaharlal Nehru University ( JNU) went unfilled and 31% grant for development of infrastructure remained unutilized.

A recent performance audit by the CAG tabled in Lok Sabha on Tuesday found that the university did not utilize its resources economically and efficiently as 11% of the available seats in various courses remained unfilled due to the defective admission policy.

The report also pointed out that 31% of the grants received for development of infrastructure remained unutilized. The university could generate a maximum of 5.91% of its annual recurring expenditure which was much below the target of 25% recommended by the Punnayya Committee in 1992-93. It did not invest its surplus funds in short term deposits which resulted in loss of interest of Rs 1.39 crore, the report said.

The CAG also pointed out that Assam University could not utilize its resources to the extent of Rs 14.30 crore efficiently as 17-39% of available seats in 28 post-graduate courses and 26-59% in four under-graduate courses remained vacant during the period of report.

In contrast, the report said, excess students were admitted in three five-year integrated courses almost in all years of report.

Out of the total 46 research projects undertaken by different departments of the university, only 12 projects could be completed as of June 2010. No mechanism for monitoring the research projects existed. The plan fund ranging 39- 73% remained unutilized in all the years during 2005-10, the report said.

JNU students hold protest demanding basic rights for Myanmar refugees

Jawaharlal Nehru University Students Union on Thursday took to the streets demanding that the government as well as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) take immediate steps to address the pathetic and abysmal condition of Myanmar refugees in Delhi.

The JNUSU presented a memorandum to the High Commissioner who they said has promised to negotiate with the government to grant refugee status to the Burmese.

The refugee camp was earlier located behind the UNHCR office in Vasant Vihar. It has now been shifted to the premises of a mosque in Sultangarhi in the Vasant Kunj-Mahipalpur area.

The refugees who had got onto a bus to reach the protest venue, were stopped from leaving the camp premises by police. Only a few members were able to reach the protest venue. In Vasant Vihar, students were not allowed to reach the UNHCR office.

We could not allow them to protest because Section 144 is imposed in the area, said a senior police officer.

The refugees said they used whatever little space they had in the camp for cooking and sanitary purposes. As a result, diseases like diarrhoea and malaria were spreading, apart from several cases of dehydration. Women and children were the worst affected.

JNUSU President Sucheta De said, It is indeed shocking that neither the UNHCR nor the government is showing even the minimum humanitarian concerns to address the basic needs of these refugees. JNUSU has been visiting the refugee camp and trying to organise some relief by collecting funds from the JNU community. But it is an enormous task and public bodies have to be pressurised to address the urgent needs of these refugees..

The issue of refugees languishing on the streets of Delhi for more than a month in the summer heat has to be addressed immediately. As of now, the refugees only have an asylum status. The government and the UNHCR must grant official a refugee status to them so that they can avail their basic rights with a sense of dignity, De said.

Over 600 Rohingya Muslim families had fled from Western Myanmar to India about two years ago after facing considerable repression under the military regime in Myanmar. They arrived in Delhi on April 9, seeking refugee status instead of asylum status that has been granted to them by the UNHCR.

JNUites take a walk down memory lane

KOCHI: Everyone remembers their college days as the best days of their life. In an informal alumni meet of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, held on Saturday morning, the former students re-lived those best days, as they exchanged pleasantries and discussed politics.

K N Panikkar, a noted historian and former professor of JNU, presided over the gathering. This forum of students from JNU should carry out the trademark of our university - discuss, debate and create dialogue. You should be a think-tank organization, said Panikkar, the present chairman of the Kerala Council for Historical Research.

More than 50 students, both former and present, came from across the country to be part of the first JNU students meet in Kerala. Among them were teacher couple Sunita and Rehman, college sweethearts of the 80s batch, Gopakumar, a Thiruvananthapuram-based history professor and P K V Kaimal, the senior-most in the group. Kaimal, a Kochiite and former member of the Indian Council of Historical Research, belongs to the first batch of JNU in 1971. He recalled how the varsity was instrumental in giving its students a sense of intellectual liberty. Swapna Patronis, a former JNU Students Union leader and at present a political analyst, was the brain behind this JNU Meet.

We started off as a Facebook event page from May 5. Yet at such short notice, we had an enthusiastic bunch of people coming in. We are planning to meet more often, said Swapna.The meet concluded with an interaction session with families, and with a definite plan to formulate a think-tank organization for the state.

Everyone remembers their college days as the best days of their life. In an informal meet of the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) students, the seniors and juniors from the university did just that on Saturday morning, exchanging pleasantries and discussing politics.

KN Panikkar, noted historian and a former professor of JNU, presided over the gathering. This forum of students from JNU should carry out the trademark of our university- discuss, debate and create dialogue. You should be a think-tank organization, said Panikkar, the current chairman of the Kerala Council for Historical Research (KCHR).

More than 50 students, both former and present, came across the country to be part of the first JNU students meet in Kerala. Among them were teacher couple Sunita and Rehman, college sweethearts of the 80s batch, Gopakumar, Thiruvananthapuram-based history professor and P K V Kaimal, the senior-most of the group.

Kaimal, a Kochiite and former member of the Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR), belongs to the first batch of JNU in1971, recalled how the university was instrumental in giving its students a sense of intellectual liberty

Swapna Patronis, a former JNU Students Union leader and currently a political analyst, was the brain behind this JNU Meet (JM). We started off as a Facebook event page from May 5. Yet at such a short notice, we had an enthusiastic bunch of people coming in. And we are planning to meet more often, said Swapna.

The meet concluded with an interaction session with families, and with a definite plan to formulate a think-tank organization for the state.

JNU hikes allowance for disabled students

Jawaharlal Nehru University has decided to increase the escort allowance for the differentlyabled students. Soon after its election, the newly elected JNU students union had gone on a hunger strike, listing this as one of its demand.

Escort allowance is given to physically and visually challenged students who have to pay writers during the exams or while writing their research thesis.

Initially, the escort allowance was Rs 1,000 per month for undergraduates and Rs1,500 for postgraduate students. With effect from April 1 this year, both UG and PG students will get Rs 2,000 per month as their escort allowance, said Sarfaraz Ahmed, a JNUSU member.

The varsity in the beginning of the year got Rs 8.51 crore in the first phase from the Union ministry of social justice and empowerment to make a barrier-free campus, to make it easier for the disabled.

According to JNU Disabled Associations president, the planning to give shape to this initiative has already started. Some initiatives like making ramps have been taken before. The process of making the campus barrier free is underway. Two committees have also been constituted for the purpose, said G N Karna, research officer, School of International Studies.

A proposal to start a Disability Studies program has also been submitted in University Grants Commission (UGC). This program will be a part of the Centre for Human Rights Studies. We expect that the UGC will take around four months to clear the proposal. Then the academic and executive councils of the varsity have to pass it, he said.

Another proposal to give scholarships and fellowships to all the differentlyabled students in the campus has also been submitted. We have submitted the proposal at Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited, Karna added. A meeting to discuss ways to start work on a barrier-free campus will be held on May 29.

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