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Shillong College, Shillong, Meghalaya



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Shillong College, Shillong, Meghalaya
Address:Boyce Road, Laitumkhrah
Shillong (District East Khasi Hills)
Meghalaya, India
Pin Code : 793003


Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya is a recognised institute / college. Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya was established on / in 1956.


Principal of Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya is Dr Smti MPR Lyngdoh.

Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya is situated in Shillong of Meghalaya state (Province) in India. This data has been provided by www.punjabcolleges.com. Fax # of Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya is 0364 2502143.

Mobile No(s) of concerned persons at Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya are 9436104812.

email ID(s) is Shillong College Shillong Meghalaya

Website of Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya is http://www.shillongcollege.ac.in/.


Contact Details of Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya are : Telephone: +91-364 2224903, 2502143


Courses

B.A, B.Sc, B.Com, B.Sc(CS), B.Sc(Microbiology), B.B.A, B.C.A


Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya runs course(s) in Arts, Biotechnology, Commerce, Computer Applications, Information Technology, Business Management, Science stream(s).

Shillong College is affiliated with North Eastern Hill University (NEHU), Shillong (Meghalaya)


Profile of Shillong College

Shillong College was inaugurated on 15th of August, 1956, and began with few students at Jail Road Boys High School. Shri Sudhindra Chandra Datta, a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics in St. Anthonys College, became the founder Principal. Before the establishment of North Eastern Hill University in 1972, Shillong College was affiliated to Gauhati University. The birth, growth and development of the Shillong College is a cumulative result of the immense sacrifice, dedication, hard work and perseverance of a good number of well meaning selfless individuals as well as some prominent organizations of Shillong and also the region as a whole.

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Media coverage of Shillong College, Shillong Meghalaya, Meghalaya

NAAC report of Shillong College

Section 1: Preface
The Shillong College was established in the year 1956 in order to cater to the needs of the children of migrant population, who settled in the then composite state of Assam (now Meghalaya) after the partition of the country. The college can well be described as a living monument to the spirit of dedication and missionary zeal of a band of young men, mainly local teachers in the then existing colleges. During its initial years, the College survived on public donations, collected sometimes from door to door, and on voluntary services rendered by certain public-spirited persons. Since then the College has maintained steady progress. Starting with a mere 35 students in a borrowed premises, the College has now a reasonably good building of its own, spread over an area of 4210 sq. meters and has nearly 2500 students and 19 teaching departments offering both General and Honours courses in Arts, Commerce, and Science. Though founded primarily to cater to the migrant Bengali children, the College has, in course of time, acquired a cosmopolitan character, and its composition represents all the ethnic groups in the state of Meghalaya. Many of the students come from nearby villages and most of them belong to the ST category and are first generation learners. The College is running both undergraduate and Higher Secondary Classes, but the observations in the report are confined to undergraduate teaching only.

The College, keen to have itself assessed in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses, sought assessment and accreditation by the NAAC and submitted its Self-study Report. The NAAC appointed the Peer Team for the assessment of the college, comprising Professor R. K. Misra, former Vice-Chancellor of the Gorakhpur University, as the Chairman of the team; Dr. Sutanu Bhattacharya, Department of Economics, Kalyani University and Dr. Anadi Kumar Kundu, Principal, Barasat Govt. College, as the members of the team. Dr. M.S. Shyamasundar, Deputy Adviser effectively functioned as the coordinating Officer from NAAC. The Peer Team visited the College during August 5 - 7, 2003.

The peer team carefully perused and analysed the Self Study Report submitted by the institution. During the institutional visit, the team went through all the relevant documents, visited the departments and the facilities and interacted with various constituents of the institution. The academic, co-curricular, extra-curricular, sports and extension facilities of the institution were visited. The peer team also interacted at length with the Head of the institution, faculty, administrative and technical staff, members of the management, students, parents and alumni/alumnae of the institution. Based on the above exercise, and keeping in mind the criteria identified by NAAC, the peer team has taken a value judgment. The assessment of the institution under various criteria, the commendable features of the institution as well as the issues of concern are given in the following pages.

Section 2: Criterion -Wise Analysis:
Criterion 1: Curricular Aspects
The College is affiliated to North Eastern Hill University for the undergraduate courses of study in Arts, Science and Commerce. There are three faculties - Arts, Science, and Commerce, and 19 teaching departments under these faculties, which offer undergraduate degree programmes in General and Honours courses of B.A., B. Sc., and B. Com. The students get a number of elective options. For the B.Sc. (General) course, the students can choose three elective subjects from among Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Zoology, and Botany, offered in two elective groups. The B.Sc. (Honours) course is offered in all the five science subjects. At the B.A (General) level, the students have the option of choosing three elective subjects from a group of eight subjects. The B.A. (Honours) course is offered in seven subjects. Similar options are also available under the B.Com programme. It is noticeable that Environmental Awareness has been made a compulsory subject in all the courses, and that several modern Indian languages relevant for the North Eastern region are also offered as subjects in the course programmes. At present the College do not have any postgraduate and research programmes or self-financing courses. It may be noted that most of the departments were established in the 1950s and 1960s and no new subjects has been introduced in the college after 1970 except the department of Garo language in 1999.

The teaching programmes are primarily focussed on the traditional subjects. Introducing local need based academic programmes and career orientations in the courses are yet to be achieved by the College. However, there is limited scope for the College to introduce these elements in the standardised curricula prescribed by the affiliating university. Moreover, introduction of new courses and programmes by the College needs approval of the affiliating university and the State Government for creation of the required teaching posts. But initiative for these desired developments in curricular aspects must come from the college. The College is planning for introducing a course on BCA an d B.Sc. Computer Science and has developed recently a well-equipped Centralised Computer Laboratory for this purpose. The College may plan for strengthening its teaching and research by establishing a few more departments, particularly in Social Sciences and Management. Moreover, the College may also consider starting a few vocational courses on self-financing basis, keeping in view the existing vocations in the region.

Criterion II: Teaching - Learning and Evaluation
Proper selection of students for admission into various courses, fair recruitment of scholarly and dedicated teachers, and effective teaching-learning process with regular and fair evaluation ensuring transparency are the building blocks of the success of an educational institution. The admission to the college is on the basis of merit in the qualifying examination.

The temporal plan of the teaching programmes is annual system and the College used to follow the traditional system of terminal examinations and promotion tests. Class tests have been introduced recently, with a minimum number of two class tests in each subject/paper. The College may consider introducing regular tutorial classes, special coaching classes, and weekly tests, followed by monthly reports to parents, and regular review of poor performing students. Remedial courses are particularly important for the students from the socially and economically disadvantaged sections of the society. It is appreciable that the College offers remedial courses in Mathematics, Economics, Physics, and Chemistry to the poor performing students and student from the socially backward communities.

The organization of the teaching in the College is quite efficient. Last session the teaching was held for 178 days. Teachers seldom take leave, and whenever a teacher is not able to take his classes, alternative arrangement is made for engaging his class. The attendance of the students is also maintained regularly and a student who is continuously absent from the classes is asked to explain his absence. Suggestion Boxes have been installed in the College where the students can give suggestions, even anonymously. The syllabus laid down by the NEHU has unitized every paper and earmarked teaching hours for each one of the topics. After a paper is assigned to a particular teacher, he is expected to follow this plan. The head of the departments with the help of an Academic Committee monitors the progress of teaching. The academic session may be divided into three terms and teaching plans are prepared accordingly for each of the terms. There are a few part-time teacher engaged by the College. The College may further supplement its classroom teaching by holding regular seminars, symposia, and incorporate more of project work, industrial visits, and fieldwork as a part of the curricula. The College may also consider improving the effectiveness of teaching through the use of modern audio-visual teaching aids.

The quality of the teachers and their academic attainments is a crucial factor determining the standard of the College. Out of a total of 73 teachers, there are 66 permanent teachers, 3 temporary teachers working full-time, and 6 part-time teachers. Of the total 66 permanent teachers only 17 have Ph.D. and 10 have M. Phil degrees. Another two teachers have already submitted their thesis for Ph.D. The College may find some ways to motivate the teachers to improve their academic qualifications with the help of various faculty improvement programmes.

The workload of the teachers is on the higher side specially because the teachers take both higher secondary and undergraduate classes. The State Government is not forthcoming with sanction of new teaching posts. At least six teaching departments have sanctioned strength of one teacher each. This naturally affects the teaching of these subjects. Some of the departments, especially the Indian language department, except Khasi having only 1 teacher each, are severely understaffed. These departments need to be strengthened. The recruitment of teachers is strictly according to norms laid down by the State Government, U.G.C. and the NEHU. In addition, the College can make appointments on unsanctioned posts out of the funds generated by 40% of tuition fee, which is earmarked for development. This amount is hardly adequate for the purpose.

The teachers are expected to regularly attend seminars, conferences, refresher courses, and orientation courses. Many of the teachers have attended refresher courses and orientation courses and have participated in seminars, conferences, other training programmes and entrepreneurship, NSS orientation etc. In course of last two years, 53 teachers participated in such seminars and 6 acted as resource persons. Besides, four teachers took advantage of the Faculty Development Programme.

The teachers may also be trained in the use of modern technology like computer, Internet, multimedia and application of audio-visual teaching aids. The College has organised regularly national level conferences and made praiseworthy publications of the proceedings of the conferences. The College also may plan to organise short-term training programmes for the teachers on the use of the modern technology in teaching and research.

For continuous improvement in the quality of education, the performance of the teachers needs to be assessed regularly. The College follows the self-appraisal method to evaluate the performance of the teachers. The appraisals may be done annually, and for more effective assessment a committee may be constituted with the Principal, Vice- Principal and senior teachers of the College. However, there is no formal mechanism for obtaining the students' feedback on classroom teaching and the effectiveness of the programmes as such. The College may consider evolving a suitable mechanism for this purpose.

The College attracts a few students from neighbouring countries like Bangladesh and Bhutan. At present the College has three students from Bhutan on its rolls.

Criterion III: Research, Consultancy and Extension
Being an affiliated undergraduate college situated with a backdrop of tribal and hilly area, Shillong College has limited scope for institutional research and consultancy. Moreover in view of the facts that there is no Post-Graduate teaching and there is heavy burden of teaching the research activity in many departments could not flourish. Despite this, some teachers are active in research. At present four small research projects are going in the college. Four teachers are registered for part-time Ph.D. The Departments of Zoology, Political Science, Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Economics, Education, Philosophy and Commerce have made some publications. This includes six research papers by the Departments of Chemistry and Zoology. The College may encourage more teachers to take up the minor research projects of the UGC.

For an undergraduate college in the tribal and hilly area, extension activities are of significant importance. Through such activities the College interfaces itself with the society and also establishes itself as a social entity. The College has made some commendable efforts in the extension activity front. The extension activities of the College are undertaken primarily through the NSS. The activities conducted include Health and hygiene awareness, AIDS awareness, Medical Camp, Environment awareness and other social work. The teachers and staff of the College have formed a non-government organisation, the Shillong College Academic Society (SCAS), which takes up various extension activities, and organises seminars and national level conferences.

The NSS volunteers and NCC Cadets of the College have won a good number of prizes in various competitions at local and national levels. The College has also organised regional level conferences. Keeping in view its tribal and hilly area context, compulsory participation in extension work for about 2-4 weeks by the students may be made a part of the curricula and examination requirement. The College may also plan to take up more programmes jointly with various NGO and GO working in the locality. Active participation of the students and teachers at large needs to be further encouraged. A cell may be established with a designated person for planning and organising extension activities on a regular basis.

Criterion IV: Infrastructure and Learning Resources
Situated in the heart of the capital city of Meghalaya in a campus area of about 2.5 acres in a serene surrounding and well-maintained campus, Shillong College has a simple but well planned building. There are two building blocks, a temporary car-parking shed, and canteen and common room blocks, built in the typical architectural structure used in the hills. The classrooms, laboratories and the library room are quite spacious and provide adequate space. However, there is a dire need for more classrooms for expanding its teaching activities. The College has been quite efficient in utilising in time the assistance of the U.G.C. for building construction provided in the 8th and the 9th Plan, and has already submitted its plan for the 10th Plan to overcome the space shortage. The College does not have any hostel unit and health centre. The College has acquired another plot of land for extending its campus area where it has planned to build a botanical garden. Providing a bigger canteen room with ample supply of drinking water and clean toilet facilities, as well and recreational facilities in the common rooms for the students need to be looked into. The Campus Beautification Committee looks after the maintenance of the campus. The College ensures optimal use of its building by running the classes in two shifts. Besides, the building is also let out for the examinations for All India Services, N.T.S., Banks and other organizations.

The laboratories are well equipped with the major equipment and well maintained. All the science departments have computers and interconnected with intercom facility. The Central Computer facility has been recently built in a well-planned manner, with the assistance of the NEC, which has 30 computers and a Server for the Local Area Networking. The reprographic facility is kept at the office, which is also used for the library purposes. The Internet facility is now available only at the office of the Principal.

The College has a well-organised Central Library and there is an Advisory Committee for the library. The library is open for 6 days a week and for 6 hours in a day. The working hours of the library may be extended further, at least to 8 hours a day. The old inventory of the library is already computerised and the recent acquisitions are being computerised now. The major handicap from which the library suffers is that there is only one person, viz., the Librarian, who is running the library with two Class IV employees.

The library needs to be strengthened with support staff, computerised search facility, reprographic facility, and CDs and Journals. With more than 16000 volumes, the library is reasonably good and catering to the needs of the students. Annual addition of books during the last two years is also satisfactory. More emphasis is required for the purchase of journals.

The College may plan to improve upon the use of computer and teaching aids. The College has also indoor and outdoor sports facility for the men and women students. The College does not have a playground at present, as it is unlikely for the colleges located in hills to have a big playground. However, the College has planned to develop the basketball and volleyball courts within the campus and has already arranged sizeable assistance for this purpose. The College may also plan to build an auditorium and set up multi-gym facilities. Since many of the students commute from the nearby villages, the need for hostel facility for the students may be looked into.

Criterion V: Student Support and Progression
The performance of the students of the College appearing in the university examinations is satisfactory, and there is negligible dropout, except a few exceptions, which is commendable. The College may consider evolving a system of obtaining the student's feedback regularly. In respect of progression to employment, it is noticed that most of the students go for traditional employment.

The alumni of the College hold important positions in different walk of life. Some of them are teachers in the NEHU and other colleges, some are government officials, some are in executive positions in banks, Ministers in the State Government, and few are Industrialists. The Alumni Association has been formed recently. The detail data in respect of the current positions of the alumni of the College are not yet available. Major decision taken by the Alumni Association was to make to more effective and raise funds for the development of the College on the eve of its Golden Jubilee due in 2005 - 06.

The College brings out updated prospectus every year and it gives all necessary information needed by the students. A multilingual College Magazine is also published regularly, where both the students and the teachers contribute. There is also a students' union elected by the students.

Financial assistance in the form of stipends from the Central and the State Government is made available to the students. A large number of students have been benefited by such scholarships and stipends. The College has a student welfare fund raised out of a levy of Rs. 50 per year on the student. This fund is utilised to help the students in distress. The College has a praiseworthy record of its games, sports, and cultural activities. Several students have represented at the national and state level teams. However, the regular leisure-time activities of the students may be strengthened through various students clubs, like Nature Club, Debate Club, Photographic Club, etc. The College has an employment and career-counselling cell, which now being looked after by the teachers taking it up as an additional charge. There is also constant interaction between the students and the teachers, who provide academic and personal counselling to the students. More attention may be given to the importance of employment and career counselling to guide the students in right directions of their future career, and also to help them explore the avenues of self-employment.
Criterion VI: Organisation and Management
Shillong College, Shillong, was established in 1956 through public initiative as a society, and it now being managed as an aided college of the State Government by the Governing Body of the College. There The College may consider evolving a system of obtaining the student's feedback regularly. are elected representatives of teachers, nominees of the affiliating university and the State Government in the Governing Body, besides the ex-officio posts, and the Principal, who acts as the Secretary. The G.B. takes keen interest in the development of the College and has recently given green signal for the first phase of construction under the Master Plan. The administration of the College is run by the Principal who is assisted by the Vice-Principal and a number of committees of teachers, e.g., Academic Committee, Discipline Committee, Admission Committee, Campus Beautification Committee, Library Advisory Committee, Examination Committee, Construction Committee and Purchase Committee. Thus, all the teachers are involved in the management of the College, and an element of participatory management in the organisation is ensured. For coordination and monitoring of academic aspects, the Heads of the Departments are entrusted. However, the College may consider having a special committee for preparing and monitoring the academic calendar of the College. The College may consider giving some room for students' involvement in decision-making. There is a grievance redressal cell. The cell may be made more effective and a mechanism may be evolved to make it in-built in the organisation and management systems.

The College needs to take up computerisation of the administrative works. So far admission records and part of accounts have been computerized. Professional development of the staff, particularly in respect of computer training, may therefore be required. Effective steps may also be taken to achieve a fully computerised system of accounts and administration. The structure of tuition fees and other fees may also be examined from time to time in relation to breakeven the cost of education. The College has a system of exercising budgetary control through annual budget. Out of the total budget of the College the expenditure incurred on salary is alarmingly high. Steps may be taken to ensure generation of funds for substantive developmental activities. The College may try to start some career-oriented and need-based self-financing courses for generating resources to fund its developmental activities.

There is no provision for pension for teachers and non-teaching employees in non-government colleges in Meghalaya. They are entitled to the C.P.F. In addition the College has instituted a scheme of its own for the benefit of the teaching and the non-teaching employees. The management gave an initial grant of 11 lacs in 1995 and thereafter all the teaching and non-teaching employees make regular contribution to it at varying rates. The lumpsum amount all with the interest is paid to employees at the time of retirement or death.

The College has a cooperative society in which nearly all the teaching and non-teaching employees are shareholders. In addition the employees make a monthly contribution of thrift fund. The member - employees can obtain loans from the cooperative society for specified purposes.

Criterion VII: Healthy Practices
The Shillong College has in course of its development evolved a number of healthy traditions and practices. The Peer Team was impressed with the fact that there is such a cordial relationship between the teachers and students and there are no symptoms of unrest in any constituent of the academic community. A discernible sense of discipline is noted in the overall climate. Some points worth mentioning are given below:

Healthy and harmonious student life and vibrant cultural and physical activities;

Nearly 40% of the students and similarly about 40 % of the teachers are female;

Different ethnic groups pursue their studies in complete harmony and no group harbours a feeling of being discriminated;

Quality education is being imparted at a lower cost;

Imparting value based education through social awareness programmes, lectures by eminent persons invited from time to time and Principals address on important occasions;

Involvement of majority of teachers in the administration of the college;

Internal quality checks performed by various academic monitoring committees.

A novel experiment made by the college has been the establishment of a NGO named Shillong College Academic Society as a registered body in 1997. Amongst its objectives are to promote national integration, to uphold national ideals and to defend fundamental human values; to popularise science amongst people of Meghalaya and to help them develop scientific outlook. The record of working of this society during its six years of existence has been impressive. They have organised a number of National level Conferences, Seminars, Workshops on subjects of special relevance to the state. These activities were organised in collaboration with different Government. Agencies and NGOs. The proceedings of the major conferences and seminars have been published in well brought out volumes. The working of the Shillong College Academic Society provides an example of how an educational institution can seek collaboration with others, raise funds and serve the College and the society.

Section 3: Overall Analysis:
The Peer Team considers that there are a number of features of the College's approach to the assurance of the quality and standards, which the Peer Team wish to commend:-

Shillong College, founded in 1956 by a team of social activists, and has made big strides since inception, and worked hard to acquire social perception as one of the best institutions of the state.

Established in order to provide higher education to the children of migrant population, the College has gradually acquired a cosmopolitan character imparting education to all sections of the society without discriminations. Different ethnic groups coexist in complete harmony.

Dedication and commitment of the teaching and non-teaching staff is one of the greatest assets of the College.

The teachers are easily accessible to the students and are helpful. The teacher-student relationship is praiseworthy and there is no student unrest.

Effective leaderships and good human relationships exist in the College.

In its backdrop of tribal and hilly area, the College caters to the need of the weaker sections of the society.

There are significant and praiseworthy achievements of the students of the College in games, sports, NCC and NSS activities.

The Shillong College Academic Society formed by the teachers of the College is a novel effort in the right direction. Its record of work is admirable and it has immense potential.

Keeping in view the future plans and potentials of the College the Peer Team would suggest the following to the College to consider:-

Introducing local need based academic programmes and career orientations in the courses may be given priority.

The College may plan for strengthening its teaching and research by establishing a few more departments, particularly in Social Sciences and Management. Moreover, the College may also consider starting a few vocational courses on self-financing basis, keeping in view the existing vocations in the region.

In spite of several constraints, the research activities and participation of teachers in faculty improvement need to be geared up. The teachers may be motivated to take up more minor and major research projects and attend seminars and conferences in other parts of the country also.

Supplementing the classroom teaching by holding more regular seminars, symposia, incorporating project work, industrial visits, and fieldwork as a part of the curricula may be considered to improve the teaching learning process. The College may also consider improving the effectiveness of teaching through the use of modern audio-visual teaching aids.

Some of the departments are understaffed in terms of the number of teachers. These departments need to be strengthened.

For professional development, the College may plan to organise short-term training programmes for the teachers on the use of the modern technology in teaching and research.

The College may consider evolving a suitable mechanism for obtaining the students' feedback on the effectiveness of classroom teaching.

Keeping in view its tribal and hilly area context, participation in extension work by the students may be further encouraged.

Providing a bigger canteen room with ample supply of drinking water and clean toilet facilities, as well and recreational facilities in the common rooms for the students need to be looked into.

The library needs to be strengthened with support staff, computerised search facility, reprographic facility, and CDs and Journals.

The College may plan to improve upon the use of computer and teaching aids. The College may also try to improve the indoor and outdoor sports facility for the men and women students, and may also consider building an auditorium and setting up multi-gym facilities.

Since many of the students commute from the nearby villages, the need for hostel facility for the students may be looked into.

More attention may be given to the importance of employment and career counselling to guide the students in right directions of their future career, and also to help them explore the avenues of self-employment.

The grievance redressal cell may be made more effective and a mechanism may be evolved to make it in-built in the organisation and management systems.

The College may start some a few self-financing courses and explore avenues for generating resources to fund its developmental activities.

Khasi is the only department having six teachers but its output is not something to be proud about. If Khasi does not receive the importance in Shillong where else will it develop? Creative writing and research in this department has to be encouraged on a priority basis.

The games and sports activities in the College are far from adequate despite the achievement of the students in different games. At least full time person be appointed to look after these activities.

The Peer team is impressed by the well coordinated and all around efforts by the teachers, staff, and students of the College under the able guidance of the Principal and Vice-Principal of the College. The Peer team is confident that the College will achieve a fast and progressive transformation in course of a few years and would be able to face the challenges of higher education in the changing scenario.

The Peer team desires to record its appreciation for the cooperation extended to them by the College during their stay on the campus. Dr.M.S.Shyamasundar, Deputy Advisor, NAAC, has coordinated the entire assessment work most effectively. But for his valuable help it would not have been possible to complete this formidable task.

Prof. R. K. Mishra (Chairman)

Dr. Sutanu Bhattacharya (Member)

Dr. Anadi Kumar Kundu (Member)

Name of the Head of the Institution
Dr. (Mrs.) M. P. R. Lyngdoh

Date: August 07, 2003



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